Feb 28, 2020  
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin 
    
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Catalog


Graduate courses at Appalachian are numbered 5000 and above. 5000 is master’s level; 6000 is specialist level; 7000 is doctoral level. Courses numbered below 5000 may not count toward the minimum hours required for a graduate degree or certificate program of study.

Courses for Continued Enrollment

Courses numbered 5989/7989 courses are intended for continued enrollment purposes only and do not count toward the minimum hours required for a graduate degree or certificate program of study. All other courses described in this bulletin (except courses numbered 5989 and 7989) are courses that count as a required or elective course on a program of study for at least one graduate degree.

Cross-listed Courses

Several courses are shared across two or more disciplines or departments, and as such are cross listed under multiple prefixes. Students may only count one version of such a course on a program of study. These cross-listed courses are indicated with a notation in (parentheses) at the end of the course description.

Dual-listed Courses

Selected courses at the 5000 level are dual listed with senior undergraduate (4000-level) courses, meaning that the two courses may be offered in the same room at the same time. Graduate students in these 5000-level courses will have additional requirements specified on the syllabus to ensure a more in-depth study of the course topics. These dual-listed courses are indicated with a notation in [brackets] at the end of the course description. Graduate students may include up to 12 semester hours of dual-listed 5000-level courses on a program of study.

NOTE: When a prerequisite is at the undergraduate level (below the 5000 level), students should consult with the department regarding whether they have the relevant background to succeed in the graduate course.

 

Physics

  
  •  

    PHY 5845 - Nanoscience and Technology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A survey of the current state of nanoscience and nanotechnology from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. Topics include, but are not limited to, nano-fabrication, tools (e.g. SEM, STEM, FIB, STM, AFM, etc.), nanomechanics, nanomaterials, Buckyballs and nanotubes, thin films, nano self-assembly, nano-scale heat transfer, thermoelectric devices, and nano-optics. Where applicable, content will be enhanced through direct experience with the available instrumentation.
    [Dual-listed with PHY 4845.]
  
  •  

    PHY 5850 - Advanced Materials Science Laboratory (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides an understanding of the relationship between structure and properties for materials via advanced laboratories. This course broadly covers material systems including: metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, semiconductors, and nanomaterials. Laboratories include the characterization of material properties and structure with advanced microscopies, tensile testing of metals, and synthesis of polymers,
    metal nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes, among others.
    Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the engineering physics graduate program or with permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    PHY 5860 - Physical Principles of Electron Microscopy (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides an overview of the fundamental principles,instrumentation, and methods of scanning electron microscopy, including all electron optical components (electron sources and guns, electron lenses, deflectors, and stigmators) and complete electron optical system physics. This overview is complemented by a thorough investigation of the electron beam-solid interaction physics and the resulting measurable signals. Image formation physics and a wide range of applications including qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques are fully developed in this course.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with PHY 4860.]
  
  •  

    PHY 5900 - Internship (1-12)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Supervised work in applied physics in an industrial or other laboratory setting. Students must obtain approval of the departmental internship coordinator prior to enrolling.
  
  •  

    PHY 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  
  •  

    PHY 5999 - Thesis (3-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Course may be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours.

Political Science

  
  •  

    P S 5001 - Scope and Methods (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to introduce students to both qualitative and quantitative research design and methods in political science. Topics will include approaches to political science, constructing research questions, literature reviews, critical reviews, hypothesis development and testing, survey design, experiments, case studies, and some introductory statistics. The course will also introduce students to the various fields in political science.
  
  •  

    P S 5002 - Research Methods and Statistics (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to introduce students to the nature, language, and statistical methods used by social scientists to conduct research in the field of political science. The course will stress both theory and application, and it will examine not only how data is gathered and analyzed by political scientists to explain human behavior, but also each step of the research process. Students will be exposed to sampling, survey research and a variety of other methods of obtaining and analyzing data. In the lab component of this course, students will have the opportunity to learn how to use computer software (mainly SPSS for Windows) to organize and analyze data and how to interpret and present the results of statistical analysis.
  
  •  

    P S 5010 - Seminar in Political Philosophy (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The seminar will provide an overview and critique of the literature in the field of political philosophy from the Enlightenment to the present.
  
  •  

    P S 5020 - Pro-Seminar in International Relations (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    The seminar will provide an overview and critique of the literature in the field on international relations.
  
  •  

    P S 5030 - Seminar in American Government and Politics (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Special investigation of selected topics in American government and politics. Topics will vary from year to year. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total of six credit hours.
  
  •  

    P S 5040 - Pro-Seminar in Comparative Politics (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    The seminar will provide an overview and critique of the literature in the field of comparative politics.
  
  •  

    P S 5050 - Seminar in Public Law and Judicial Behavior (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An examination of the multiple roles of law and the judicial system in the formulation and execution of public policy, to include the role of the judiciary in politics and government with emphasis on variables affecting judicial decision making.
    (Same as CJ 5050.)
  
  •  

    P S 5070 - Seminar in Media and Politics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of the large role played by the media in American and international politics. An examination of the large role played by the media in elections, state and local government, the judicial branch, Congress, the presidency, international affairs, and the individual political socialization process.
  
  •  

    P S 5100 - Seminar in Congressional Politics (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    Designed as an introduction to the major research on the U.S. Congress, students will critically examine theories of representation, congressional decision-making, the role of various institutional structures, and inter-branch relations. Topics will vary from year to year. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total of six credit hours.
  
  •  

    P S 5110 - Campaigns and Elections (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An examination of the theoretical approaches used to study American campaigns and elections. The course will examine research on public opinion, voting behavior, campaign strategies, turnout, and electoral outcomes at the local, state and national levels of government.
  
  •  

    P S 5120 - Readings and Research in International Relations (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course explores the problems and issues confronting international politics, new theoretical perspectives, and trends in the field of international relations. Topics may vary from semester to semester.
  
  •  

    P S 5125 - Readings and Research in Comparative Politics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course explores the problems and issues in various political systems, new theoretical perspectives of studying politics, and trends in the field of comparative politics. Topics may vary from semester to semester.
  
  •  

    P S 5130 - Appalachian Political Perspectives (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate odd-numbered years
    An examination of the political process in the Appalachian region. The fundamental political problems, the interrelationships of Appalachia and its people with the larger American political system, political culture, and economy.
  
  •  

    P S 5135 - Readings and Research in American Politics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines research and contemporary issues regarding the American electoral process and the key institutions of American National Government. Topics will vary from year to year. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total of six credit hours.
  
  •  

    P S 5145 - American Political Parties and Interest Groups (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An examination of the history, formation, and maintenance of American political parties and interest groups. Existing literature and the theoretical importance of these intermediaries in the political process will be evaluated. The roles of parties and interest groups as organizations, the roles they play in electoral politics, how they mobilize voters, and their roles in government will be examined.
  
  •  

    P S 5150 - Seminar in Public Policy (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Alternate Years
    An examination of the theories associated with the policy process including problem identification, agenda setting, decision-making, formulation, legitimation, implementation, and evaluation. The course will focus on policy change and it will also focus on substantive policy areas such as environmental and social policy.
  
  •  

    P S 5155 - Seminar in Political Behavior (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will examine numerous topics in political behavior, such as individual and mass participation, belief systems, public opinion, civic engagement, party identification, political psychology, tolerance, political socialization, and voting and elections. The course will also assess the means by which scholars have evaluated questions on the nature of political behavior and the conclusions they have drawn.
  
  •  

    P S 5170 - Advanced Political Psychology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will explore how cognitive and social psychology can be applied to the behavior of individuals and groups in American politics. To this end, it will cover theories of attitude change, information processing, ideology, emotions, intergroup relations, authoritarianism, and identity. The goal of the course is to encourage students to think critically about the material and gain an appreciation for interdisciplinary research.
  
  •  

    P S 5330 - Problems in State and Local Government (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Research on selected topics in American state and local government. The topics may vary from year to year.
  
  •  

    P S 5400 - Washington at Work (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to combine an academic perspective of the actors and institutions in our nation’s capitol with a hands-on exploration of Washington, D.C. and it will include both classroom teaching and a week in Washington, D.C. Requirements for the course will include classroom instruction, required readings, quizzes, and a research paper
  
  •  

    P S 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    P S 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    P S 5640 - Studies in Regional Political Patterns (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of selected regions of the world which have common historical and cultural patterns influencing their political styles and capabilities. Topics may vary from semester to semester.
    [Dual-listed with P S 4640.]
  
  •  

    P S 5661 - Court Administration (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to familiarize students with the need for, and approaches to, more effective management of federal and state courts. Topics include court reform, court unification, caseload management, alternative dispute resolution, personnel management and training, and audio-visual applications in the courts, among others.
    (Same as C J 5661 .) [Dual-listed with P S 4661.]
  
  •  

    P S 5670 - Advanced Environmental Politics (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course examines the role that politics and government play in dealing with environmental issues. Its focus is primarily on the U.S. approach to environmental protection, but some attention will be devoted to international environmental relationships such as the Kyoto Protocol. The course will cover the history of environmental policy, the legal and institutional arrangements for environmental protection, major environmental controversies and global environmental concerns.
  
  •  

    P S 5675 - Readings and Research in Environmental Policy (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines research and contemporary issues within environmental policy. Special topics include, but are not limited to: international environmental policy, environment and development, environmental justice, climate politics, resource governance, and others. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total of six credit hours.
  
  •  

    P S 5680 - Organized Crime (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    This course will provide an examination and analysis of views on the phenomena of organized crime and efforts to control it. Attention will be paid to criminal organizations in the United States, their beginnings in other cultural and ethnic backgrounds and their relations with criminal organizations around the world. In today’s world, criminal organizations in other countries and their activities have a major impact on crime in the United States. Therefore, a comparative approach to the subject must be used.
    (Same as C J 5680 ). [Dual-listed with PS 4680.]
  
  •  

    P S 5710 - American Political Thought (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A survey of the diverse political ideas represented in the American state from the colonial period to the present. Special emphasis is given to the political problems that emerge with the process of industrialization and the movement into a postindustrial economy.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4710.]
  
  •  

    P S 5721 - Human Rights (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course surveys the major literature in the field of international human rights. It investigates the questions of ethics, morality and the practice of human rights globally and attempts to address why the issue of international human rights has come to the fore in international politics.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4721.]
  
  •  

    P S 5722 - U.S. Foreign Policy (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    Investigates U.S. foreign policy from differing perspectives, focusing in on the historical record and contemporary issues.
  
  •  

    P S 5723 - International Political Economy (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of the relationship between political and economic activity, the way actors use one to manipulate the other, and the normative choices involved in doing so.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4723.]
  
  •  

    P S 5741 - European Governments and Politics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides an overview of the political development of Europe since World War II. We will compare the enduring features of West European politics, such as parliamentary democracy and the welfare state, with the dramatic changes in Eastern Europe, from the Communist seizure of power to the collapse of Communism. We will also explore the common challenges facing Europe today, such as regional integration and the rise of nationalism.
    [Dual-listed with P S 4741.]
  
  •  

    P S 5742 - Politics of Developing Nations (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    Focuses on the efforts of a majority of the world’s governments to meet the twin challenges of participatory politics and of the Global market economy.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4742.]
  
  •  

    P S 5743 - The European Union (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The emergence of the European Union is one of the major events in European history. The course explores the genesis and evolution of the idea of European integration and chronicles its organizational development in the post WWII era. Emphasis is placed on the politics of integration and the emergence of the Union as a major participant in world events.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4743.]
  
  •  

    P S 5744 - Middle East Politics (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An examination of the political, cultural, economic and social patterns of the Middle East.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4744.]
  
  •  

    P S 5745 - African Politics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course begins with the historical context of African politics. Then, it explores the problems of governance following independence and discusses the contemporary debate between two contending schools of thought in African politics and development: Afro-optimism and Afro-pessimism. It examines Africa’s relations with developing and developed countries as well.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4745.]
  
  •  

    P S 5748 - Latin American Politics (3)


    When Offered: Spring, Alternate years
    Examines Latin American politics in detail covering historical context, political actors, and current issues in Latin America.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4748.]
  
  •  

    P S 5800 - Directed Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Directed research on a topic selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Student is expected to write a major research paper on this topic. May not be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite: P S 5002  or C J 5000 .
  
  •  

    P S 5900 - Internship in Public Affairs (3-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Field work in government, community, professional offices and agencies and involvement in problem solving in these offices and agencies.
  
  •  

    P S 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  
  •  

    P S 5998 - Thesis Preparation (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    The purpose of this course is to offer the student who chooses to write a thesis the opportunity to initiate a literature search, review research strategies, develop hypotheses for testing, and prepare a thesis proposal for review by the thesis committee. Graded on an S/U basis. (P S 5998 is a prerequisite to P S 5999 .)
  
  •  

    P S 5999 - Thesis (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.
    Prerequisite: P S 5998 .

Production Operations Management

  
  •  

    POM 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    POM 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring

Psychology

  
  •  

    PSY 5011 - Teaching of Psychology (1)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A course required of all graduate teaching assistants responsible for teaching one or more sections of PSY 1200 (General Psychology). Students will be introduced to alternative teaching approaches, guided in constructing tests, and provided information about teaching resources. Students’ success in teaching will be evaluated.
  
  •  

    PSY 5015 - Research Seminar (1)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A seminar on selected topics in research that allows students to gain experience related to all phases of empirical research, including review of relevant empirical literature, examination of appropriate research methods, and the dissemination process, including peer review, presentation, and publication. Course may be repeated up to four hours for credit.
  
  •  

    PSY 5020 - Research Methods in Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An examination of the procedures and principles involved with experimental, quasi-experimental, and other non-experimental research, including problem formulation, literature review, measurement issues, sampling, research design, data analysis, and report writing using APA format.
    Prerequisite: an undergraduate statistics course.
  
  •  

    PSY 5030 - Quantitative Methods in Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course continues the content of PSY 5020  and examines research/quantitative methods used in psychology. Students learn how to plan, structure, conduct and interpret statistical analyses. A written project is required.
    Prerequisite: PSY 5020 .
  
  •  

    PSY 5040 - Applied Psychological Research and Evaluation (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides students with the opportunity to acquire skills necessary to perform independent research and evaluation in field settings. It continues the content of PSY 5020  for those students who will be employed in applied settings (e.g., schools, hospitals, and governmental agencies).
    Prerequisite: PSY 5020 .
  
  •  

    PSY 5045 - Introduction to Human Resources and Professional Issues (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides an overview of the various human resource management functions in organizations, examines current issues that face human resource professionals, and helps to develop students’ teamwork, interpersonal, presentation and professional skills. Students will get an opportunity to employ the science-practitioner model and develop solutions to current issues facing human resource professionals.
    (Same as MGT 5045 )
  
  •  

    PSY 5055 - Leadership, Groups, and Teams (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to provide a broad perspective on leadership and teams in the fields of I-O psychology and human resource management. The course will be divided into two sections. The first section, on leadership, will examine both historical and contemporary views of leadership in organizations. The second section of the course, on work teams, will examine the dynamics that occur when individuals must work closely together toward a common goal. Students will examine the theory and research on teamwork and group dynamics, as well as the ways that teams are currently used and managed in today’s organization.
    (Same as MGT 5055 )
  
  •  

    PSY 5065 - Organizational Development (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the processes by which behavioral science knowledge and practices are used to help organizations achieve greater effectiveness. Emphasis on the nature, history, assumptions, strategies and models, intervention techniques, and ramifications of organizing development.
    (Same as MGT 5065 .)
  
  •  

    PSY 5070 - Organizational Behavior Management (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This seminar course will review current topics in the field of Organizational Behavior Management-Performance Management (OBM-PM). Readings and class discussion in Part 1 of the seminar will cover the application of the three-term contingency (ABC Analysis) and behavior analysis assessment issues. Part 2 of the seminar will focus on intervention strategies that have empirical evidence of their effectiveness in changing behavior in organizational settings. These include training, prompting, stimulus control, reinforcement, differential reinforcement, punishment, goal setting and feedback, and modeling. Part 3 of the seminar will allow the class to investigate recent topics in OBM (i.e., response generalization, establishing operations, resistance to change, rumors and gossip). Additionally, students will engage in an OBM related research project that will be developed into a Scholarly Product.
  
  •  

    PSY 5207 - Evolutionary Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course examines how human thinking, motivation, behavior, and social relationships can be understood from the perspective that many aspects of human behavior involve sets of processes designed by natural selection to solve adaptive problems faced by our evolutionary ancestors. Key topics may include: problems of survival, long-term mating, sexuality, parenting, kinship, cooperation, aggression and warfare, conflict between the sexes, status, prestige, social dominance, and how evolutionary theory can provide a unified approach to understanding the different branches of psychology.
    [Dual-listed with PSY 4207.]
  
  •  

    PSY 5208 - Forensic Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course will provide an in-depth study of the ways in which psychology and the law interact. It will include a study of the way in which researchers and mental health professionals contribute to legal issues as well as the ways in which research and mental health practice are governed by the law.
    [Dual-listed with PSY 4208.]
  
  •  

    PSY 5300 - Learning (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A comprehensive survey of the methods, findings, and theories of classical and operant conditioning in human and non-human learning. Skills necessary to evaluate, integrate, and summarize significant empirical literature will be developed.
  
  •  

    PSY 5310 - Cognitive Processes (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the primary research topics in cognitive psychology. Specifically, students should acquire detailed knowledge of the human information processing system and the memory systems that support it.
  
  •  

    PSY 5320 - Biological Bases of Behavior (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course concerns biological processes related to behavior emphasizing relationships between brain and behavior. The fundamentals of neuroanatomical, neurophysiological and neurochemical correlates of behavior and mental processes are explored. Basic aspects of neuroscience as related to some mental illnesses and neurological disorders are discussed.
  
  •  

    PSY 5330 - Developmental Seminar (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The purpose of this course is to expose graduate students to the major western theories of developmental psychology, to current research methodology, and to relevant developmental concepts. Students will gain a biographical and historical understanding of each theorist. A major goal of this course is for students to be familiar with recent research and modifications relating to the traditional developmental theories. In addition, graduate students in this course will have the ability to hone critical thinking skills and to engage in intellectual discourse through discussions.
  
  •  

    PSY 5340 - Seminar in Social Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The course will include an historical account of social psychology, as well as a critical evaluation of current issues and research in the area.
  
  •  

    PSY 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    PSY 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A special topic may be offered depending upon student and faculty interest. Permission of the instructor required.
  
  •  

    PSY 5552 - Diagnosis and Psychopathology (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Consideration of diagnostic practices of common psychological disorders, including symptom criteria, epidemiological data, with an emphasis on the acquisition of applied diagnostic skills. Content will often include a study of the origin, development, and manifestations of psychological and causal models with empirical support.
    Prerequisite: PSY 2212 (Abnormal Psychology) or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    PSY 5555 - Advanced Educational Psychology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides an advanced examination of research-based psychological concepts, principles, and theories that are relevant to teaching and learning, with particular emphasis on biological, cognitive, and psychosocial development; cognitive and behavioral learning theories; and individual and group differences.
  
  •  

    PSY 5562 - Psychology of Adulthood and Aging (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Overview of the Psychology of Aging, with coverage of sensory, cognitive, and socio-emotional changes relevant to applied professions. Emphasis will be on applications of existing theory and research, and on encouraging an understanding of how to understand and interact with adults of all ages. Graduate students will be expected to become involved in an area of research.
    [Dual-listed with PSY 4562.]
  
  •  

    PSY 5565 - Adolescent Psychology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of the physical, intellectual, and emotional changes that occur during adolescence. Relationships among physical development, mental growth, adolescent interests, personality, and social consciousness, will be explored.
  
  •  

    PSY 5583 - Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course offers a broad overview of health psychology and behavioral medicine to clinical health psychology graduate students or graduate students in an allied health field. This course represents a bio-psycho-social-spiritual approach to integrating evidence-based psychological services to treat medical patients in integrative health care settings (behavioral medicine) as well as interventions to individuals or communities to prevent the development or progression of medical diseases (health psychology). Students will gain an overview of psychologists’ roles in the U.S. health care system and how to modify behavior in clinical or public health settings to prevent/treat the leading causes of morbidity/mortality for U.S. citizens (e.g., heart disease, diabetes, chronic pain, obesity, etc.). This course will entail didactic learning through seminar-style discussion of select readings, clinical skills training necessary for psychologists in integrative health care settings, and intensive research of a health psychology topic embedded within a bio-psycho-social-spiritual model via individual/small group study.
  
  •  

    PSY 5584 - Community Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides an overview of the methodology, theory and application of the community psychology perspective to community mental health practice. The course focuses on both theoretical and methodological foundations of community psychology practice with an emphasis on rural environments. We will also consider the moral, legal, and ethical ramifications of community-level interventions.
  
  •  

    PSY 5593 - Biofeedback (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will review the historical background of biofeedback, stressing biofeedback as an aid in stress management, in the treatment of psychosomatic disorders and muscle relaxation, and in the physiological basis of self regulation. Students will have the opportunity to become familiar with the application of the EMC, ST trainer and other biofeedback instrumentation through demonstration and practice. Ethical issues are explored.
  
  •  

    PSY 5610 - Advanced Experimental Psychology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A critical study of the major experimental findings and of research methodology in contemporary psychology. Emphasis will be placed upon problems in human learning and cognition.
  
  •  

    PSY 5655 - Contemporary Issues in Psychology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An investigation and discussion of psychological phenomena using scientific methodology and empirical research to evaluate causal claims, evaluate research, assess validity and engage in critical thinking. A focus of the class will be the use of empirical research literature, as well as oral and written assignments to improve reasoning skills in order for students to become more critical consumers of information from both academic and popular sources. Topics will span multiple areas of psychology.
    Prerequisite: PSY 3100 (Research Methods in Psychology) or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    PSY 5660 - Staffing (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of techniques used in employee selection and placement. Emphasis is on job and task analysis and the application of psychology in recruitment, biographical data, interviewing, work samples, assessment centers, rating scales, and testing.
    (Same as MGT 5660 .)
  
  •  

    PSY 5661 - Performance Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The study of methods used to describe and measure work behavior. Specific attention is given to developing competencies in job analysis and performance management in order to facilitate the evaluation of employee contributions to organizational success.
    (Same as MGT 5661 .)
  
  •  

    PSY 5671 - Training and Development (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the roles, functions, and skills of human resource development professionals. Consideration given to such topics as the philosophy and psychology of HRD, the design and implementation of training and development programs, and the major program areas and organizational settings for HRD.
    (Same as MGT 5671 .)
  
  •  

    PSY 5672 - Advanced Organizational Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An examination of theory and research focused on individual and social processes in organizations. Topics include organizational research methods, job attitudes, mood, work stress, motivation, leadership, work groups and teams, prosocial behaviors, organizational culture and climate, and organizational theory and structure.
    (Same as MGT 5672 .)
  
  •  

    PSY 5700 - Cognitive Assessment (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A practice-based study of the development, standardization, and interpretation of a variety of cognitive and developmental measures including the Wechsler Scales and selected other individually administered psychometric instruments. Supervised practice in administration, scoring, and interpretation is provided.
  
  •  

    PSY 5701 - Personality Assessment (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A survey of the underlying theory, reliability, validity, and utility of several individually-administered personality assessment devices. Practice in administration, scoring, interpretation and report writing is included.
    Prerequisites: PSY 5700  and PSY 2212 (Abnormal Psychology) or equivalents.
  
  •  

    PSY 5702 - Psychoeducational Assessment for Intervention I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    As the first in a two-course sequence, this course introduces students to the foundations of psychoeducational assessment, including psychometrics and measurement; legal, ethical, historical, family, and diversity issues; and various methods and models for assessing students within the school context. Students will demonstrate competency in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of results of the most commonly used tests of academic achievement and learn to integrate results into comprehensive written reports with associated recommendations for interventions. Emphasis will be placed on the application of assessment data to address academic needs. Practice laboratory sessions are required.
    Prerequisite: admission to the School Psychology graduate program.
  
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    PSY 5703 - Psychoeducational Assessment for Intervention II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    As the second in a two-course sequence, this course extends students’ knowledge and skills in school-based assessment for intervention. Students will have the opportunity to learn historical and theoretical foundations of intelligence as well as characteristics of and methods of assessing various educational disabilities. Students will demonstrate competency in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of results of the most commonly used measures of cognitive abilities, perceptual-motor integration, and adaptive behaviors and learn to integrate assessment data from multiple measures into comprehensive written reports with associated recommendations for interventions. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of assessment skills and methods attained during PSY 5702 - Psychoeducational Assessment for Intervention I (3) , as well as the application of assessment data to address instructional problems. Practice laboratory sessions are required.
    Prerequisites: PSY 5702  
  
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    PSY 5704 - Emotional/Behavioral Assessment for Intervention (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course examines current models and methods of school-based assessment of the emotional, behavioral and social functioning of children and adolescents, as well as pertinent legal, ethical, historical, family, and diversity issues and relevant federal and state regulations. Supervised practice with a school-based case will be provided, and students will learn to integrate emotional-behavioral assessment results into a comprehensive written report with associated recommendations for interventions.
    Corequisite: PSY 5902 - Practicum II: School Psychology (3) .
  
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    PSY 5705 - Psychotherapy: Foundations and Ethics (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course involves learning fundamental clinical skills including interviewing and basic clinical interventions. Legal and ethical principles in the practice of psychology are considered.
  
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    PSY 5713 - Child Psychopathology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A critical evaluation of the development of common psychological disorders in children and adolescents. The emphasis will be on developing skills in differential diagnosis and understanding current research on etiology.
  
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    PSY 5714 - Psychotherapy Interventions I (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A critical evaluation of the current major approaches to and research concerning psychotherapeutic behavior change with adults. A systematic review of empirically verified treatments for the most prevalent disorders will be provided.
  
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    PSY 5715 - Psychotherapy Interventions II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A critical evaluation of the current treatments for bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, trauma-based disorders, personality disorders, and sexual dysfunctions. The empirical literature will be reviewed, and students will have the opportunity to learn to apply empirically verified treatment techniques for these disorders.
  
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    PSY 5716 - Interventions for Children and Adolescents (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The main emphasis in the class will be on developing the necessary knowledge to effectively implement empirically supported interventions for children and adolescents in clinical and school settings. An in-depth review of the treatments for the most common childhood disorders will be provided.
  
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    PSY 5717 - Assessment and Intervention Planning for Special Populations (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Advanced study of effective problem-solving, psychoeducational assessment, and intervention planning for such special populations as preschoolers, English language learners, and children with autism. Pertinent legal, ethical, and diversity issues and relevant federal regulations will be examined.
  
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    PSY 5800 - Applied Behavior Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An advanced study of the philosophy, principles and procedures of applied behavior analysis and a review of selected research. Practical, ethical, and legal constraints on behavioral interventions are considered. Research conducted in institutional, educational and home settings is emphasized.
    Prerequisite: PSY 3100 (Research Methods in Psychology) or permission of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with PSY 4700.]
  
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    PSY 5810 - Functions and Ethics of the School Psychologist (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    As an introduction to the profession of school psychology, this course reviews historical foundations, current practices, and emerging models in the field. Students critically consider current roles and functions of school psychologists, relevant state and federal laws and regulations, important ethical and professional issues, and the school psychologist’s relationships with parents, students, other school personnel, and relevant community resources. The course is designed to be a catalyst in the development of the student’s professional identity as a school psychologist.
    Prerequisite: admission to the School Psychology graduate program.
  
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    PSY 5820 - Multi-tiered Prevention and Intervention (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course prepares students to use an evidence-based problem-solving process within a multi-tiered, school-based system of behavioral and academic supports, with a focus on prevention and early intervention. Students learn how to collaborate effectively with others to facilitate organizational change that promotes positive academic, behavioral, and mental health functioning of diverse populations in the schools and are trained in crisis prevention and preparedness using a curriculum developed by the National Association of School Psychologists.
    Prerequisite: admission to the School Psychology graduate program.
  
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    PSY 5901 - Practicum I: School Psychology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is limited to graduate students in school psychology. The student will be placed in a public school setting one full day a week under professional supervision (both on site and in the university classroom). A minimum of 135 supervised clock hours must be completed. Tasks accomplished are commensurate with level of training.
  
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    PSY 5902 - Practicum II: School Psychology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is limited to advanced graduate students in school psychology. The student will be placed in a public school or equivalent setting based on background and needs. Students work under on-site supervision and must attain a minimum of 135 supervised clock hours. Tasks accomplished are commensurate with level of training.
  
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    PSY 5904 - Practicum I: Clinical Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Students will train in a professional mental health or medical setting for the equivalent of one day per week. Supervision is provided on-site by staff psychologists or other professionals. Weekly class meetings supplement the on-site training to provide additional group supervision as well as coverage of professional issues.
  
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    PSY 5905 - Practicum II: Clinical Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Students will train in a professional mental health or medical setting for the equivalent of one day per week. Supervision is provided on-site by staff psychologists or other professionals. Weekly class meetings supplement the on-site training to provide additional group supervision as well as coverage of professional issues.
  
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    PSY 5906 - Practicum III: Clinical Psychology (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Practicum experience is available to students in the MA program in Psychology: Clinical track. Students will train in a professional mental health or medical setting. Supervision is provided on-site by staff psychologists or other professionals. Weekly class meetings supplement the on-site training to provide additional group supervision as well as coverage of professional issues.
    Prerequisite: permission of the program director.
 

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