Oct 23, 2019  
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin 
    
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Catalog


Graduate courses at Appalachian are numbered 5000 and above. 5000 is master’s level; 6000 is specialist level; 7000 is doctoral level. Courses numbered below 5000 may not count toward the minimum hours required for a graduate degree or certificate program of study.

Courses for Continued Enrollment

Courses numbered 5989/7989 courses are intended for continued enrollment purposes only and do not count toward the minimum hours required for a graduate degree or certificate program of study. All other courses described in this bulletin (except courses numbered 5989 and 7989) are courses that count as a required or elective course on a program of study for at least one graduate degree.

Cross-listed Courses

Several courses are shared across two or more disciplines or departments, and as such are cross listed under multiple prefixes. Students may only count one version of such a course on a program of study. These cross-listed courses are indicated with a notation in (parentheses) at the end of the course description.

Dual-listed Courses

Selected courses at the 5000 level are dual listed with senior undergraduate (4000-level) courses, meaning that the two courses may be offered in the same room at the same time. Graduate students in these 5000-level courses will have additional requirements specified on the syllabus to ensure a more in-depth study of the course topics. These dual-listed courses are indicated with a notation in [brackets] at the end of the course description. Graduate students may include up to 12 semester hours of dual-listed 5000-level courses on a program of study.

NOTE: When a prerequisite is at the undergraduate level (below the 5000 level), students should consult with the department regarding whether they have the relevant background to succeed in the graduate course.

 

Psychology

  
  •  

    PSY 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. PSY 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  
  •  

    PSY 5998 - Thesis Proposal (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    PSY 5999 - Thesis (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisite: PSY 5998 .
  
  •  

    PSY 6620 - School-Based Consultation (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    For school psychologists, counselors and other human service personnel in various fields who deal with parents and/or teachers in a consultative and educational capacity. The course will include a review of consultation models and theories of both a group and triadic nature. It will also provide an opportunity for role play which reflects actual consulting situations. Emphasis will be placed on concerns related to academic deficit, behavioral problems in the school and home, and family stress.
    (Same as HPC 6620 .)
  
  •  

    PSY 6621 - Advanced Consultation (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides advanced training that focuses on building fluency in (a) consultation skills, (b) functional assessment that is linked directly to intervention, and (c) evidence-based interventions for social/behavioral concerns.
    Prerequisites: PSY 6620 /HPC 6620  or PSY 5800  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    PSY 6900 - Internship (1-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Internships are required for students in the Clinical Psychology and School Psychology programs and are an option for students in the Industrial- Organizational Psychology and Human Resource Management (I/O-HRM) program. The requirements are listed below. Clinical Psychology: Placement in a mental health setting practicing psychology to include experience administering psychological evaluations, individual or group psychotherapy and behavior change, and consultation with relevant professionals and community agencies, supervised by a psychologist. Students must complete a minimum of 600 hours and many sites require 1,000+ hours. Prerequisite: approval of the internship instructor and the Clinical Health Psychology program director. Graded on an S/U basis. May be repeated for a total credit of six semester hours. School Psychology: Placement in a school setting under appropriate professional supervision for 1,200 hours, on a full-time basis over two consecutive semesters (6 credit hours per semester), or on a half-time basis over four consecutive semesters (3 credit hours per semester); to include experience with psychoeducational problem solving and assessment; individual and group counseling; collaborative consultation with parents, teachers, interdisciplinary teams, and community agencies; behavior change strategies; in-service training; and applied research. Successful completion of the internship is required of all students enrolled in the School Psychology program. Graded on an S/U basis. Industrial/Organizational-Human Resource Management: Placement in an applied setting in which students can gain experience in various aspects of human resource management and development. Students will develop skills in personnel selection and placement, performance, appraisal, attitude measurement, motivation of employees, training and development of change within organizations. Student should enroll in MGT 5900  and are expected to complete a minimum of 400 hours over a period of ten weeks.
    Graded on an S/U basis.

Public Administration

  
  •  

    P A 5000 - Research Methods (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The goal of this course is the development of the analytical abilities that will be needed by the student as a practicing public administrator. The foundations of inquiry, the various approaches to the study of social phenomena, and several analytical techniques are presented, discussed, and practiced.
    Prerequisite: an undergraduate statistics course.
  
  •  

    P A 5010 - Field-Based Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Intensive research is conducted under faculty supervision on a topic related to the student’s current or prospective employment and/or professional experience.
  
  •  

    P A 5060 - Seminar in Public Administration (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    History and development of the field of public administration with focus on the role of the administrator in the political process. Analysis of public agencies in a political context. Consideration of contemporary issues related to the field such as administrative ethics, decision making, and strategic planning.
  
  •  

    P A 5140 - Emergency Management Systems (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    This course covers the roles and responsibilities of local, state and federal government agencies in times of disaster. Four key actions (planning, response, recovery and mitigation) are highlighted in understanding the changing role of government vis-à-vis individuals and businesses in minimizing loss of life and property due to natural, technological and terrorist actions. This course focuses on preparedness planning issues, intergovernmental relations, financial support for affected communities, and the changing requirements for professional development in Emergency Management in the 21st Century.
  
  •  

    P A 5160 - Topics in Public Administration (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An examination of selected problems in public administration with emphasis on analytical case studies.
  
  •  

    P A 5180 - Public Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An examination of the major forces that influence the formation, implementation and administration of public policy and methodological approaches to assess the impact of public policies.
    Prerequisite: P A 5000  
    (Same as C J 5180 .)
  
  •  

    P A 5260 - Organization Theory and Behavior (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An examination of the basic theoretical approaches and issues in organizations and organizational behavior and the dynamics of human interactions within public bureaucracies.
  
  •  

    P A 5270 - Not-for-Profit Organizations (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An overview of the voluntary sector with emphasis on the administration and management of not-for-profit organizations. Areas of study will include theories on the development of not-for-profit organizations, government-nonprofit relationships, and advocacy efforts. Techniques of nonprofit management will include emphasis on ethics, board/volunteer recruitment, and marketing as well as grants and other funding sources.
  
  •  

    P A 5271 - Grants Strategies and Preparation (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    Overview of the grants arena in the U.S., with emphasis on the techniques of proposal preparation. Topics include the history of the grants system, types of grants, sources of funding, application process, and contract administration. Practical exercises in identifying funding opportunities, preparing elements of a grant application, and scoring completed proposals are incorporated.
  
  •  

    P A 5360 - Public Personnel Administration (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Overview of public personnel practices with a focus on methods of employee recruitment selection, evaluation, and related aspects. Analysis of issue areas such as fair employment practices, affirmative action, and comparable worth.
  
  •  

    P A 5460 - Budgeting and Fiscal Administration (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The politics of budgeting, budgetary process, and fiscal administration in public and non-profit agencies.
  
  •  

    P A 5461 - Public Financial Management (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The principles and practices concerning the efficient and prudent management of the funds / finances of the government.
  
  •  

    P A 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    P A 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    P A 5558 - Capstone Research (1)


    When Offered: Spring
    Capstone Research is a course which involves the completion of a significant research paper under the direction of a major professor selected by the student from among the Master of Public Administration faculty.
    Corequisite: P A 5559 .
  
  •  

    P A 5559 - Capstone in Public Administration (2)


    When Offered: Spring
    This seminar integrates the theoretical and practical perspectives of public administration as a discipline. The capstone course involves students in management problem-solving as well as the following activities: development of executive skills; refinement of presentation skills; discussions of likely ethical situations; and securing public sector employment.
    Corequisite: P A 5558 
  
  •  

    P A 5560 - Local Government Administration (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Administrative process, management, personnel, budget and finance, and intergovernmental relations in local government.
    Prerequisite: approval by the instructor
    [Dual-listed with PA 4560.]
  
  •  

    P A 5665 - Public Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the organization and operation of government agencies and their role in policy making and implementation and an examination of the various concepts and theories pertaining to administrative behavior and to the performance of the basic tasks of management.
  
  •  

    P A 5800 - Directed Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Directed research on a topic selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Student is expected to write a major research paper on this topic. May not be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite: P A 5000 .
  
  •  

    P A 5900 - Internship in Public Administration (3-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Field work in government, community, professional offices, and agencies; and involvement in problem solving in these offices and agencies.
  
  •  

    P A 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. PA 5989 does not count toward a degree.

Reading

  
  •  

    R E 5010 - Literacy Instruction and Assessment for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course will address issues, strategies, technologies, materials and methods of successful literacy instruction and assessment of students with autism spectrum disorders. Inclusive and self-contained settings will be addressed through examples and experiences with students on the autism spectrum.
  
  •  

    R E 5040 - Teacher as Researcher (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course provides an opportunity for practitioners to explore, using systematic observations and reflection, an area of interest in their professional practice. Teachers will research and solve specific problems in educational settings. The ultimate goal is that the inquiry conducted by the student should lead to an improvement in practice and to an increased understanding of the issues, both theoretical and practical, that arise in the course of conducting research.
    (Same as C I 5040 /RES 5040 /SPE 5040 .)
  
  •  

    R E 5100 - Teaching Beginning Readers and Writers (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Various approaches to teaching beginning readers and writers are introduced (K-3). There is an emphasis on teaching methods that capitalize on the language competence students bring with them to school. Word recognition, comprehension, and writing instruction are considered within the framework of a meaningful, integrated reading/language arts program.
  
  •  

    R E 5111 - Issues, Trends, and Practices in Reading (2-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Provides students with an in-depth study of significant issues, trends, and practices in reading at all educational levels. The course is designed to deal with questions and problems of the type facing key teachers, supervisors, and administrators. Because the course is concerned with current trends and issues, it is assumed that the course will undergo periodic changes in terms of what is current.
  
  •  

    R E 5120 - Psychological Bases of Reading (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The thrust of this course is toward providing advanced reading majors with a comprehensive over-view of contemporary theories of psychology and instruction as they can be applied to explicating the complex processes underlying reading behavior. Basically, the course deals with the following areas: (1) definitions of reading; (2) reading as verbal behavior; (3) perception and sensation in reading; (4) reading and cognition; (5) learning and reading; (6) growth and development and reading; (7) attention, motivation, and reading; (8) personality and reading; (9) learning from written materials; and, (10) individual differences and reading.
  
  •  

    R E 5130 - Teaching the Language Arts (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the latest research, practices, interpretation, methods, materials and strategies in teaching the language arts.
  
  •  

    R E 5140 - Advanced Study of Children’s Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Provides an opportunity for students to extend their knowledge of children’s books. Emphasis will be placed on an examination of the history of major publishers of children’s literature, multicultural perspectives in reading and writing, and the theories of response to literature. Consideration will be given to how literature contributes to learning and language development.
  
  •  

    R E 5200 - The Politics of Literacy (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines literacy from political, historical and theoretical perspectives. The role of special interest groups and federal and state agencies on literacy instruction will be examined. A strong emphasis throughout the course will be on the development of students as thinkers, researchers, writers, and advocates for effective literacy policy.
  
  •  

    R E 5210 - Educating Students with Reading Disabilities (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines the federal policy and school-level practices that affect the education of students with reading disabilities. Changes in federal policy will be examined across a historical context. Students will be challenged to think critically about these changes and evaluate the degree to which federal policy facilitates the education of students with reading disabilities.
  
  •  

    R E 5220 - Teaching Intermediate Struggling Readers (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course acquaints teachers with issues involved in providing effective reading instruction to struggling readers in grades fourth through eighth. Among these issues are assessment, materials selection, grouping and management concerns, and instruction (including comprehension, word recognition, fluency, and vocabulary). Participating teachers should leave the course with a better conceptual understanding of the specific challenges they face and strategies and tools for meeting these challenges.
  
  •  

    R E 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    R E 5510 - Field Experience in Teaching Reading (1-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Students register only by permission of the advisor.
  
  •  

    R E 5525 - Product of Learning (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Cross-listed: SPE 5525  
  
  •  

    R E 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    R E 5570 - Reading Curriculum: Organization, Supervision and Assessment (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Studies are made of reading curriculum designs, and the implementation, supervision and evaluation of reading programs.
    Prerequisite: 18 hours in reading or permission of the advisor.
  
  •  

    R E 5671 - Research in Current Literature in Reading (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Research and critical analyses are made in current periodicals, journals, and recent books on critical areas of reading.
    Prerequisite: 18 hours in reading or permission of the advisor.
  
  •  

    R E 5710 - Seminar in Reading and Language Arts Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Current theory and research in reading and the language arts are examined. Students select a topic in which to pursue in-depth study and then their newly-acquired knowledge is applied to classroom teaching. Emphasis is placed on assisting teachers to be leaders in school settings. This course should be taken at the end of the Master of Arts program.
  
  •  

    R E 5715 - Reading Assessment and Correction (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An in-depth examination of informal reading assessment practices and remedial teaching techniques. This course includes practicum experiences in administering and interpreting informal word recognition, contextual reading, and spelling instruments.
  
  •  

    R E 5725 - Practicum in the Clinical Teaching of Reading (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Provides students with a closely supervised practicum experience in which they assess and teach children/adults who are experiencing reading difficulties.
    Prerequisite: R E 5715 
    Corequisite: R E 5740 .
  
  •  

    R E 5730 - Reading and Writing Instruction for Intermediate and Advanced Learners (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Strategies for helping students use reading and writing as tools for comprehension of texts and for learning in content-area disciplines are explored. A broad cultural view of literacy forms the context for reviewing the research on strategic teaching and learning. The general focus is on third-grade through adult learners.
  
  •  

    R E 5735 - Practicum in Teaching Severely Disabled Readers (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides a supervised clinical teaching experience with severely disabled readers. Students are guided in the use of systematic multisensory reading instruction. The topic of reading disability will be investigated throughout the semester.
  
  •  

    R E 5740 - Seminar in the Clinical Teaching of Reading (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Provides students with experiences designed to enable application to general education settings of insights gained through assessing and teaching children/adults who are experiencing reading difficulties.
    Prerequisite: R E 5715 .
    Corequistie: R E 5725 .
  
  •  

    R E 5760 - Adult Literacy Instruction (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An in-depth review of assessing and teaching literacy skills in Adult Basic Education programs.
  
  •  

    R E 5900 - Internship (3-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An internship in the area of reading education.
    Prerequisite: permission of the advisor.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  
  •  

    R E 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. RE 5989 does not count toward a degree.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  
  •  

    R E 5999 - Thesis (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.
  
  •  

    R E 6120 - Psychological Processes in Reading (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines current theories of reading processes, supporting research, and implications for teaching reading. The course is approached from a cognitive psychological perspective, where the nature of mature reading is considered first, followed by consideration of developmental issues in reading. Course topics will include research on eye movements, comprehension, phonemic awareness and decoding, beginning reading, and fluency, as well as other current theoretical issues.
  
  •  

    R E 6568 - Language and Linguistics in Reading (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines language acquisition and language structure from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Students will have the opportunity to learn about cognitive, social, and cultural aspects of language. Emphasis will be placed on understanding psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic perspectives; language acquisition; and components of language, including pragmatics, semantics, syntax, morphology, and phonology. Concepts of oral and written language will be explored within the context of community and classroom discourse and literacy practice.
  
  •  

    R E 6575 - Technology and Literacy (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides students an opportunity to critically examine the central issues and theoretical perspectives in research on technology and literacy, with an emphasis on critically examining the educational function of communication technology, assisted technology, digital and multimedia text, and educational software. Students will study the nature of technology and literacy, related classroom implementation issues, and specialized use of technology for students with disabilities.
  
  •  

    R E 6700 - Historical Trends in Reading Theory and Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines significant trends and developments in reading theory and research from the early 1900s up to the present. Emphasis will be placed on three time periods: 1910-1930 which featured behavioral psychology, the development of basal readers and the first university-based reading clinics; 1955-1965 which featured the “Great Debate” between advocates of phonics and whole-word reading methodologies; and 1975-1995 which ushered in cognitive theories of reading and two competing psycholinguistic explanations of the reading process. Throughout the course, connections will be drawn between predominant reading theories and their effects on classroom reading materials and instructional methods.
  
  •  

    R E 6731 - Advanced Issues in Literacy and Learning (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides opportunities for students to investigate current theory and research related to specific literacy topics. The course also engages students in analyzing current literacy programs and practices to identify the theoretical orientation, research base, historical context, and political agendas that inform them. Representative topics include: comprehension, composition, classroom discourse, vocabulary, English language learners, and evolving representations of literacy and text.
  
  •  

    R E 6735 - Severe Reading Disability (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course takes an in-depth look at the topic of severe reading disability as it is currently understood. To this end, relevant research, discussion, and practices are surveyed and studied.
  
  •  

    R E 7570 - Administering Reading/Language Arts Programs: The Research Base (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Provides the theoretical framework administrators need to supervise comprehensive classroom reading and language arts programs. The current research literature will be examined across several areas, including: psychological models of the reading process, reading/writing relationships, academic work, teacher effectiveness, and observation of instruction. This literature will form the basis for examining existing program approaches to teaching reading and language arts in the elementary school and for content area programs in middle and secondary schools. Next, “ideal” program models will be developed, and, finally, methods for implementing, supervising and evaluating programs will be analyzed.
  
  •  

    R E 7710 - Improving Reading/Language Arts Instruction in the Schools: Problem-Solving Seminar for Administrators (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This seminar will focus on real world problems that administrators face in planning, implementing, and evaluating reading/language arts programs in public school settings. Discussion of pre-selected problems (with corresponding reading lists) will form the core of the course. Students will be encouraged to focus on specific reading and writing issues and problems in their own school districts.
    Prerequisite: R E 7570 .
  
  •  

    R E 7989 - Doctoral Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing doctoral research.

Recreation Management

  
  •  

    R M 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    R M 5560 - Leisure and Aging (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course focuses on the leisure needs and characteristics of the senior citizen. Programs and resources designed to service the leisure needs of this population will be examined. Focus will be on program planning and development to meet problems inherent in leisure delivery systems for seniors.
    [Dual-listed with RM 4560.]
  
  •  

    R M 5561 - Field Laboratory in Outdoor/Adventure Programming (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    The primary focus of this course is to prepare students to design and implement a backcountry field experience. The class will be divided into three sections. The first section will be preparation and planning, followed by a five-day field expedition, and ending with an extensive assessment of the experience.
    Prerequisite: HPC 5440  or permission of the instructor.

Religious Studies

  
  •  

    REL 5400 - Religion in Appalachia (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An examination of the origins, history, contemporary practices, and beliefs of the people of the Southern Appalachia region. Attention will be given to religion within the formal structure of the church, within the social structures of mountain life and as a component of individual identity.
  
  •  

    REL 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    REL 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    REL 5649 - Seminar (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An intensive study of special problems, topics, or issues related to the study of religion. The subject matter of this course will vary and barring duplication of subject matter, a student may repeat the course for credit.
    Prerequisite: one course in religious studies or consent of the instructor.
  
  •  

    REL 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.

Research

  
  •  

    RES 5000 - Research Methods (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    The primary purpose of this course is to enable practitioners to read, interpret, and conduct research aimed at improving their practice in their professions. The course includes a study of research methods, encompassing those used in action research, experimental, non-experimental, and qualitative research, evaluation, and policy analysis designs.
  
  •  

    RES 5040 - Teacher as Researcher (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course provides an opportunity for practitioners to explore, using systematic observations and reflection, an area of interest in their professional practice. Teachers will research and solve specific problems in educational settings. The ultimate goal is that the inquiry conducted by the student should lead to an improvement in practice and to an increased understanding of the issues, both theoretical and practical, that arise in the course of conducting research.
    (Same as C I 5040 /R E 5040 /SPE 5040 .)
  
  •  

    RES 5060 - Qualitative Research Traditions (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course reviews the foundations of qualitative design, investigating the history, philosophy and nature of qualitative research. Examples of different types of qualitative research in the social sciences will be discussed. Learners will read and evaluate reports of qualitative research and identify methodological issues. Learners will also be introduced to qualitative methods through informal fieldwork.
  
  •  

    RES 5070 - School-Based Evaluation and School Improvement Planning (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to equip the local school administrator with the tools necessary for designing and carrying-out school-based evaluation and for designing and implementing a school-improvement plan based on evaluation data. Students examine a variety of evaluation models, define school-improvement goals and objectives amenable to empirical data collection, select appropriate evaluation methodologies and data-analytic procedures, and develop an overall evaluation design and school-improvement plan based on real or simulated school- and district-based information.
  
  •  

    RES 5080 - Data-Driven School Leadership (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prospective school executives will have the opportunity to gain skills in using a variety of data sources to inform their decision-making processes. These skills include using Excel and other statistical programs available, freely, on the web to analyze data; analyzing and interpreting a variety of sources of school-related data; interpreting standardized tests, and classroom assessments; constructing useful survey and opinion instruments; and testing empirical hypothesis related to school and teacher effectiveness.
  
  •  

    RES 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Subject matter may vary depending on student interest and need. A student may enroll more than once provided the content does not duplicate that of the previous course.
  
  •  

    RES 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Subject matter may vary from term to term depending on student interest and need. A student may enroll more than once in a selected topics course provided that the content does not duplicate that of the previous course. Limit of six hours credit.
  
  •  

    RES 5560 - Classroom Assessment (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is a survey of key measurement and assessment concepts needed by classroom teachers. It focuses on developing and using classroom assessments, including informal observations, that are linked to instructional objectives and classroom practices, and on the interpretation of state-mandated, formal assessments. Traditional forms of assessment along with newer forms of assessment, including performance and portfolio assessments, are emphasized. Each student will be required to complete an action research project related to classroom assessment practices.
  
  •  

    RES 5600 - Educational Statistics (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A study of descriptive statistics, correlational techniques, and simple regression as applied to practice and research in education and counseling. Instruction in and extensive use of SPSS statistical package included.
    [Dual-listed with RES 4600.]
  
  •  

    RES 6000 - Advanced Research Methods, Design and Application (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course provides advanced guided study in the foundations for and practice of research methods in the social and behavioral sciences. Emphasis will be on students becoming both critical consumers of educational and human services research literature and practitioners capable of conducting research. The course will assist in developing and strengthening students’ capacity for and professional application of research in assessment, accountability and data-informed decision-making. The course also prepares students to design research that may be required for advanced graduate degrees.

Rhetoric & Composition

  
  •  

    R C 5100 - Composition Theory, Practice, and Pedagogy (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An introduction to composition theory and relevant rhetorical, reading, and psycholinguistic theory with an emphasis on the connections among theory, practice, and pedagogy. Required of teaching assistants.
  
  •  

    R C 5120 - Teaching in the Writing Center (1)


    When Offered: Fall
    Required of all graduate students working in the Writing Center.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    R C 5121 - Teaching Basic Writing (1)


    When Offered: Fall
    Theory and practice in teaching Basic Writing. Required of all graduate students teaching Basic Writing.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    R C 5122 - Teaching Expository Writing (1)


    When Offered: Fall
    Theory and practice in teaching Expository Writing. Required of all graduate students teaching Expository Writing.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    R C 5124 - Teaching Writing Across the Curriculum (1)


    When Offered: Spring
    Theory and practice in teaching Introduction to Writing Across the Curriculum. Required of all graduate students teaching introduction to Writing Across the Curriculum.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    R C 5300 - Studies in Rhetoric and Composition (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Alternate years
    A critical study of issues in rhetoric and composition. Content to vary; may be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
    Prerequisite: R C 5100  or R C 3450 (Writing Center Theory and Practice) or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    R C 5400 - Rhetorical Theory (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Even-numbered years.
    This course introduces students to contemporary rhetorical theories and to major trends and figures in the history of the rhetorical tradition.
  
  •  

    R C 5410 - Digital and Visual Rhetorics (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Alternate odd-numbered years.
    This course focuses on rhetorical practice as it is applied in digital environments.
  
  •  

    R C 5510 - Graduate Writing Workshop (1)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An introduction to writing formats in graduate study. May be repeated for additional credit.
  
  •  

    R C 5990 - Capstone in Rhetoric and Composition (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A substantial piece of writing addressing a specific concern in rhetoric and composition.
    Prerequisites: Composition Theory, Practice, and Pedagogy; Studies in Rhetoric and Composition; and permission of the instructor.

Social Work

  
  •  

    S W 5001 - Advanced Standing Transitional Seminar (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    This course is intended for students seeking advanced standing in the Master of Social Work degree and is open only to those with a Bachelor of Social Work degree from a CSWE (Council on Social Work Education) accredited program. Students enrolling in this course will be tested on their mastery of the content of the foundation year (the first 30 semester hours) of the MSW Program. Successful completion of this course, with a minimum grade of “B” or better, is required of all students seeking advanced standing in the Master of Social Work degree programs.
    Prerequisite: Admission to advanced standing in the Master of Social Work Degree.
  
  •  

    S W 5005 - Foundations of Social Work Practice (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is an introduction to MSW-level professional social work. It provides a comprehensive overview of the social, political and economic contexts that led to the emergence of the profession of Social Work, areas of social work practice and service delivery systems, and professional ethics and values. This class examines both personal and professional issues related to social work practice with a focus on sensitivity to, understanding of, and appreciation for diverse cultural backgrounds.
  
  •  

    S W 5010 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This is the first of two courses in the MSW foundation year that provide knowledge for understanding and assessing human behavior and interaction in varied social, cultural, and economic contexts as a necessary foundation for effective social work practice. The course will examine bio-psycho-social development from birth through early adolescence, utilizing ecological systems and life span/life course perspectives.
  
  •  

    S W 5020 - Practice with Individuals and Families (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This first practice course of the MSW foundation year includes development of basic social work skills regarding communication and interviewing, assessment and intervention, evaluation, and termination, with an emphasis on micro systems. There is emphasis on the application of social work theory, values and ethics to practice and adaptation of intervention approaches to meet the needs of vulnerable groups and diverse populations.
  
  •  

    S W 5030 - Foundations of Social Work Research (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Examines processes of theory building and a variety of scientific methods that provide the foundation for research in social work settings. Students will have the opportunity to learn about elements in social work research that include social work ethics, problem formulation, research design, data analysis and reporting, and utilization of research in social work venues.
  
  •  

    S W 5040 - Field Practicum and Seminar I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Supervised placement in a human service agency provides the student the opportunity to apply in a practicum setting material learned in the other MSW foundation courses. The practicum will include micro, mezzo, and macro levels of practice. The seminar will provide the student opportunities to explore field-based practice, policy issues, and theories. Students will complete 240 hours in the practicum.
  
  •  

    S W 5200 - Social Welfare Policy Analysis and Practice (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides an in-depth knowledge of the historical contexts of social welfare systems and social welfare policies, including the exploration of social problems, assessment of policy alternatives, analysis of policy implementation, prioritization of revisions, and introduction to strategies for policy change. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the impact of policies on varied client populations.
    Prerequisites: Successful completion of S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030  and S W 5040  or permission of the MSW Program Director.
  
  •  

    S W 5210 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This is the second of two human behavior courses in the MSW foundation year that provide a basis for effective social work practice. This course examines bio-psycho-social development from late adolescence through the late adulthood, utilizing ecological systems and life span/life course perspectives. The influence of macro systems on human development and behavior will be addressed.
    Prerequisites: successful completion of S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , and S W 5040  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    S W 5220 - Practice with Groups and Communities (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The course uses the knowledge and skills of social work and builds on this foundation to include groups and community practice. Knowledge of theories, models and interventions for group and community practice that are learned in the class are integrated and applied in the concurrent student field internship.
    Prerequisites: successful completion of S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , and S W 5040  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    S W 5230 - Evaluation of Professional Social Work Practice (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to provide students with the fundamental knowledge and skills to conduct planned evaluations of social work practice with varied client populations at the micro- and macro- levels.
    Prerequisites: successful completion of S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , and S W 5040  or permission of the instructor.
 

Page: 1 <- Back 104 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14