Nov 20, 2019  
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin 
    
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Catalog


Graduate courses at Appalachian are numbered 5000 and above. 5000 is master’s level; 6000 is specialist level; 7000 is doctoral level. Courses numbered below 5000 may not count toward the minimum hours required for a graduate degree or certificate program of study.

Courses for Continued Enrollment

Courses numbered 5989/7989 courses are intended for continued enrollment purposes only and do not count toward the minimum hours required for a graduate degree or certificate program of study. All other courses described in this bulletin (except courses numbered 5989 and 7989) are courses that count as a required or elective course on a program of study for at least one graduate degree.

Cross-listed Courses

Several courses are shared across two or more disciplines or departments, and as such are cross listed under multiple prefixes. Students may only count one version of such a course on a program of study. These cross-listed courses are indicated with a notation in (parentheses) at the end of the course description.

Dual-listed Courses

Selected courses at the 5000 level are dual listed with senior undergraduate (4000-level) courses, meaning that the two courses may be offered in the same room at the same time. Graduate students in these 5000-level courses will have additional requirements specified on the syllabus to ensure a more in-depth study of the course topics. These dual-listed courses are indicated with a notation in [brackets] at the end of the course description. Graduate students may include up to 12 semester hours of dual-listed 5000-level courses on a program of study.

NOTE: When a prerequisite is at the undergraduate level (below the 5000 level), students should consult with the department regarding whether they have the relevant background to succeed in the graduate course.

 

Exercise Science

  
  •  

    E S 5200 - Exercise Science Seminar (1)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course will be open to first year graduate students in Exercise Science. Topics to be discussed will fall within the sub-disciplines of the field of exercise science and will vary from semester to semester. Evaluation will be on participation, attendance and presentation quality.
  
  •  

    E S 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    E S 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Courses may include topics such as: adult fitness and cardiac rehabilitation; perceptual motor development; motor development; physical education for the handicapped; motor assessment and interpretation.
  
  •  

    E S 5555 - Advanced Nutritional Aspects of Exercise and Sports (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of nutrition specific to physical activity and sport performance. The course utilizes reading, presentation, and discussion of published research on carbohydrate, protein, and fat consumption, digestion, and metabolism to demonstrate the importance of diet in exercise performance. A special concentration on ergogenic aids is provided.
    (Same as NUT 5555 .)
  
  •  

    E S 5560 - Research Project (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Selected broad research topical area of student’s choice concerned with conceiving and carrying to completion a research project. Each student will have an advisor for the research project and will present the findings to peers in a colloquium.
  
  •  

    E S 5591 - Biomechanical and Physiological Laboratory Assessment (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An introductory graduate course to provide experiences in data acquisition and problem solving through a variety of physiological and biomechanical laboratory techniques; a basic overview of sampling/recording techniques will be presented.
  
  •  

    E S 5592 - Data Analysis in Sport and Exercise Science (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Methods of acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data most often encountered in sport and exercise science will be included. Emphasis will be placed on descriptive methods, statistical methods and computer applications.
  
  •  

    E S 5600 - Analysis of Sports Performance (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is an overview of non-Olympic, Summer and Winter Olympic sports. It focuses on physiological and biomechanical requirements, and other performance characteristics and sport requirements. Typical resistance training programs for each sport will also be discussed.
  
  •  

    E S 5620 - Advanced Cardiorespiratory Physiology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This is an advanced course in cardiovascular exercise physiology designed to address specific principles and concepts of cardiorespiratory physiology as they apply to physical work. Topics such as cardiac function, blood flow, ventilation, oxygen transport and metabolism will be covered, focusing on cardiovascular control during acute and chronic exercise.
  
  •  

    E S 5623 - Exercise Physiology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the effects of exercise and training throughout the life cycle on bioenergetics, respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, neural, muscular, skeletal, and endocrine systems within the context of acute exercise and adaptation to habitual exercise.
  
  •  

    E S 5625 - Exercise Testing for Clinical Populations (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides experience in common clinical exercise testing procedures and interpretation for various chronic disease populations. Students will be required to conduct a variety of clinical exercise tests used in the assessment of common cardiopulmonary and metabolic chronic diseases used in clinical settings and hospitals. Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency through practical evaluations, written examinations, and group presentations. Emphasis will be placed on the student’s ability to independently manage exercise testing in preparation for leadership roles in a variety of clinical settings.
  
  •  

    E S 5645 - Current Trends in Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course details the functions of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems emphasizing pathophysiology and treatment Focus will be on current literature to address recent findings in disease and treatment.
    Prerequisite: E S 5620 .
  
  •  

    E S 5650 - Theoretical and Practical Aspects of Strength and Conditioning (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A comprehensive study of training theory and methods with an emphasis on the development of maximal strength, power, and anaerobic capacity. Also included is a brief review of neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, endocrine, and bioenergetic aspects of exercise and training, as well as hands-on experience in lifts, drills, and testing procedures.
  
  •  

    E S 5660 - Exercise Prescription and Chronic Disease Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A comprehensive overview of the physical, physiological, and metabolic responses of the human body to exercise testing and training in healthy individuals and in those with metabolic, cardiovascular, and/or pulmonary disease. The focus will be on exercise as both treatment and prevention of disease, as well as managing healthy and clinical populations in a safe and professional setting. Current literature will be included to keep students up to date with novel treatments. An overview of environmental and legal considerations in the prescriptive process will also be discussed.
    Prerequisite: E S 5620 .
  
  •  

    E S 5670 - Clinical Exercise Practicum I (1-2)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course will provide practical experience within several community-based clinical exercise settings. Students will be required to complete 50 contact hours within an approved clinical setting for each hour of credit. Potential clinical settings include cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation, cardiac testing, pulmonary testing, cancer rehabilitation and pediatric exercise programming.
    Prerequisite: E S 5625 .
  
  •  

    E S 5680 - Clinical Exercise Practicum II (1-2)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course will provide practical experiences within several community-based clinical exercise settings. Students will be required to complete 50 contact hours within an approved clinical setting for each hour of credit. Potential clinical settings include cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation, cardiac testing, pulmonary testing, cancer rehabilitation and pediatric exercise programming.
    Prerequisites: E S 5625  and E S 5670 .
  
  •  

    E S 5710 - Biomechanics (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This represents an advanced graduate course in the science of human motion with emphasis on theory and application of quantitative analysis techniques. Skills will be developed in both kinetic and kinematic sampling, recording, and interpretation procedures.
  
  •  

    E S 5900 - Internship (1-12)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A guided, practical experience at a qualified program site. Internship credit is determined by the ratio of 50 contact hours for one hour of credit for a maximum of 12 s.h.
  
  •  

    E S 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  
  •  

    E S 5999 - Thesis (2-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring

Family & Child Studies

  
  •  

    FCS 5001 - Orientation to Research in Family and Consumer Sciences (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Orientation to and examination of research methodologies, collection and analyses of data, and preparation of reports.
    Prerequisites: any undergraduate statistics course including ECO 2100 (Business and Economic Statistics I), STT 2810 (Introduction to Statistics) or STT 3820 (Statistical Methods I), or RES 4600/RES 5600 , or equivalent.
  
  •  

    FCS 5002 - Family and Consumer Sciences Perspectives and Integrative Frameworks (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An examination of professional roles and behaviors, issues and trends, professional practice and ethics, and philosophical base of family and consumer sciences.
  
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    FCS 5010 - Evidence-Based Practice in Early Childhood Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    This course will examine the meaning of evidence-based practice as it applies in early childhood education and intervention, with the goal of preparing students to become critical consumers of research. Students will review current literature concerning evidence-based practices for early childhood settings and explore ways to apply research findings in their professional practice across a variety of settings (e.g., school, home, intervention agency).
    (Same as C I 5010 /SPE 5010 .)
  
  •  

    FCS 5020 - Early Intervention (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Odd-numbered years
    This course will acquaint students with federal legislation pertaining to early intervention (EI) and examine multiple ways that early intervention (EI) professionals provide services in a variety of settings (e.g., home, child care facilities, schools, agencies, and community settings such as parks and grocery stores). Characteristics and needs associated with specific disabilities will be addressed as well as strategies to individualize services for children and their families.
    (Same as C I 5020 /SPE 5020 .)
  
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    FCS 5100 - Application and Theories of Child Development (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    Consideration of selected meanings, definitions, and functions of theories of child development as related to practical application of these theories to program planning and implementation for preschool children in home and group settings.
  
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    FCS 5111 - Advanced Developmental Assessment and Program Evaluation for Children (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Odd-numbered years
    This course is designed to provide students with skills and knowledge in assessing the development of children, and the interests, concerns, and priorities of families. Students will collect data for the purpose of monitoring children’s progress, family outcomes, and program effectiveness.
    (Same as CI 5111/SPE 5111.)
  
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    FCS 5112 - Advanced Developmental Curriculum and Instruction for Young Children (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    This course is designed to provide students with advanced skills and knowledge in application of a research base to design, adapt and evaluate curriculum and environments suitable for the integration of infants, toddlers, preschool and kindergarten children of various developmental levels and abilities in inclusive settings.
    (Same as C I 5112 /SPE 5112 .)
  
  •  

    FCS 5113 - Seminar: Issues in Birth through Kindergarten Education (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Even-numbered years
    This seminar is designed to build leadership skills to enable the student to consult and collaborate with other professionals. It will permit the development of depth and breadth in professional growth as well, and provide the foundation for life-long learning for the advancement of knowledge in the field of early childhood education and early intervention.
    (Same as C I 5113 /SPE 5113 .)
  
  •  

    FCS 5140 - Family-Professional Partnerships in Birth Through Kindergarten Education (3)


    When Offered: F.Even-numbered years.
    This course is designed to focus on major issues in the field of family studies and to understand the unique role of professionals who will be working in collaborative partnerships with families to promote positive outcomes for young children and their families. Students will incorporate existing research and current technology to develop a plan to assist families and children to reach their educational goals through family advocacy. Students will use this material to work directly with a family and develop a research-based presentation for class.
  
  •  

    FCS 5305 - Recent Issues in Housing and Interiors (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of recent issues in housing and interiors.
    Prerequisite: FCS 1300 (Housing Environments) or equivalent.
  
  •  

    FCS 5310 - Historic Housing and Renovation (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of historical houses and their renovation for contemporary living.
  
  •  

    FCS 5315 - Housing for the Elderly (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An overview of housing for the elderly including housing needs, available housing, accommodations, housing dissatisfactions, attitudes toward living arrangements, housing standards and design, congregate housing, housing disruption and site/location criteria.
    Prerequisite: FCS 4315 (Habitats and Public Policy)or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours.
  
  •  

    FCS 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graduate students may broaden or intensify their program through individual research and involvement in a given area of family and consumer sciences.
  
  •  

    FCS 5525 - Product of Learning (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
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    FCS 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An opportunity to study a special topic or combination of topics not otherwise provided for the Family and Consumer Sciences curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
  
  •  

    FCS 5551 - Families in Later Life (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    In-depth study of factors influencing interrelationships in family development in the later years.
    Prerequisite: FCS 2103 (Family Development Over the Life Cycle) or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with FCS 4551.]
  
  •  

    FCS 5600 - Families, Economics and Demographic Change (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of the economic pressures on families and how these pressures have helped to produce demographic change in families. This process will involve the identification of major demographic changes, discussion of key elementary economic concepts, and the application of these concepts to the family setting.
    Prerequisite: FCS 2600 (Family Economics) or ECO 2030 (Principles of Economics - Price Theory) or equivalent.
  
  •  

    FCS 5609 - Seminar in Vocational Education (1)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the historical, legislative, and philosophical bases of vocational education; organization of vocational education in North Carolina; and contemporary issues in vocational education.
    Prerequisites: Approval of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with FCS 4609.]
  
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    FCS 5610 - Administration of Early Childhood Programs (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the role of the program administrator in a variety of early childhood settings, both public, private, and non-profit. This study will involve program planning, staff administration, assessment of facility and equipment needs, appropriate program and financial management using computer management software and studying the state regulations that govern programs for young children.
    Prerequisite: : FCS 4556 (Infant/Toddler Curriculum) or FCS 4602 (Preschool Curriculum and Instruction) or FCS 3110 (Enriching Experiences and Programming for School-Age Children) or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with FCS 4610.]
  
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    FCS 5611 - Psychosocial Care of Families and Children in the Hospital (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    This course is designed to prepare students to work in non-medical professions with families and children in a hospital setting. The course includes an understanding of procedures, illnesses, and stress along with theory and practice to better serve families. This course is taught by a Certified Child Life Specialist and meets the requirements for the Child Life Council.
    [Dual-listed with FCS 4611.]
  
  •  

    FCS 5700 - Advanced Curriculum in Family and Consumer Sciences (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Applying curriculum theory for updating and reorganizing secondary and postsecondary family and consumer sciences curriculum including the integration of FHA.
    Prerequisite: licensed family and consumer sciences teacher or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    FCS 5705 - Evaluation in Family and Consumer Sciences (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Evaluation theory, process, and skill in relation to assessing student achievement and program effectiveness. Application of knowledge will be made through the development of test item banks.
    Prerequisite: eligible for teaching license or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    FCS 5710 - Family and Consumer Sciences Communication Strategies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Selection, organization, and use of strategies and materials for presenting family and consumer sciences related concepts.
    Prerequisite: eligible for teaching licensure or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours.
  
  •  

    FCS 5900 - Internship (3-12)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A structured field experience, paid or unpaid, in an area related to the program and supervised by department faculty. A proposal is to be submitted to the graduate committee and be approved for participation the semester previous to beginning the experience. No credit will be given for experience not previously approved.
    Prerequisite: 15 s.h. graduate courses toward degree program and proposal approved.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  
  •  

    FCS 5901 - Research Project (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Implementation of an approved research proposal: collection and analysis of data, preparation of report(s) and presentation of project. FCS 5901 may be repeated for a total credit of three semester hours.
    Prerequisite: FCS 5001  and proficiency in statistics.
  
  •  

    FCS 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. FCS 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  
  •  

    FCS 5999 - Thesis (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.

Finance, Banking & Insurance

  
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    FIN 5020 - Applied Financial Analysis (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The purpose of this course is to instruct the student in the use of electronic spreadsheets for the purpose of financial analysis. Financial models will be built and used for capital budgeting, working capital management as well as financial structure decisions.
    Prerequisites: admission to the MBA Program and MBA 5600 .
  
  •  

    FIN 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring.On Demand
  
  •  

    FIN 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    FIN 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. FIN 5989 does not count toward a degree.

Foundations of Education

  
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    FDN 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
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    FDN 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Subject matter may vary from term to term depending on student interest and need. A student may enroll more than once in a selected topics course provided that the content does not duplicate that of the previous course. Limit of six hours credit.
  
  •  

    FDN 5800 - History of American Education (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the historical development of education in the United States. Special emphasis is given to educational concepts and practices as they relate to political, social, and cultural development in the growth of a system of public education.
  
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    FDN 5801 - Education of the Culturally Diverse (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A general survey of situations encountered by the teacher in a culturally diverse society. An emphasis on the development of the empathetic teacher and the creation of teacher strategies and materials.
    [Dual-listed with FDN 4800.]
  
  •  

    FDN 5810 - Education in Appalachian America (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A course designed to assist the teacher of mountain children in understanding the pupil and school in the Appalachian culture. Various Appalachian cultural descriptors and their effect on schooling will be discussed with attention to the creation of teaching strategies and materials.
    [Dual-listed with FDN 4810.]
  
  •  

    FDN 5840 - Social and Philosophical Foundations of Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An examination of the philosophical assumptions which appear to influence education policy decisions and an examination of social forces which impact on education - particularly the process we call schooling. Inquiry into significant social and philosophical issues in education is a major component.
  
  •  

    FDN 5861 - History of Postsecondary Education in America (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The study of the development of colleges and universities, community, junior, and technical colleges; and the adult and community education movements. The impact of movement in education, internationally on the development of postsecondary education in America are explored. The study of current issues and problems in postsecondary education is included.
  
  •  

    FDN 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. FDN 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  
  •  

    FDN 5999 - Thesis (3-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    For (077) Instructional Technology Specialist only. Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.
  
  •  

    FDN 6500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    FDN 6530-6549. - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    FDN 6600 - Historical Survey of Reading Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Provides student with breadth and depth in the evolution of the field of reading. History of the field will be studied along the following subdivisions: 1) sociology of reading, 2) physiology and psychology of reading, and 3) pedagogy of reading.

French

  
  •  

    FRE 5000 - Research and Critical Theory (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Overview of source materials and advanced research methodologies in languages. Study of the various critical movements and disciplinary approaches to language and literature. Practical application of methods for uncovering, evaluating, organizing, and reporting of source material.
    (Same as SNH 5000 .)
  
  •  

    FRE 5001 - Francophone Children’s and Adolescent Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course will investigate the history and development of children’s and adolescent literature in France and in the francophone world. Study of roles and perceptions of the child and adolescent as these appear in fictional and (auto)biographical writings, and various mass media. Readings may vary.
  
  •  

    FRE 5002 - Masterpieces of Francophone Art and Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of French and Francophone plastic, performance, and verbal art from various historical periods and geographic origins. The course offers a pluridisciplinary exploration of relationships between artistic works and the cultures that produce them. Readings may vary. Barring duplication of content, the course may be repeated for a total credit of six semester hours.
  
  •  

    FRE 5003 - French Women Writers (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An examination of French women writers and their works from the Middle Ages to the present. The survey will consider examples of many genres women have created, used, or adapted. Primary sources chosen for important themes will be complemented by historical and critical readings. Selection of authors and works will vary from semester to semester.
  
  •  

    FRE 5004 - The French Media (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The course explores the historical evolution, vehicles of diffusion, purposes, and importance of French media from traditional print to innovative hypertext, and from rudimentary radio to digital broadcasting of the “information age.” Coursework includes theoretical readings that complement a “hands-on” investigation and manipulation of these various media.
  
  •  

    FRE 5021 - Poetry of French Expression (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Comprehensive overview of poetic form, function, and analysis as these pertain to the French- speaking world and French and Francophone literary history. Commented readings of representative poetic texts as products of culture and as tools for language learning.
  
  •  

    FRE 5023 - Theater and Performance in French (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Study of a variety of aspects pertaining to theatricality and theatrical genres from traditional venues to pop culture icons. Primary texts will be complemented by theoretical works, film adaptations, and other media presentations. Readings may vary.
  
  •  

    FRE 5025 - French Cultural Studies (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of various artifacts, historic events, and cultural practices and theories that have shaped the private and public spheres of social and institutional development in France. Readings may vary.
  
  •  

    FRE 5026 - Francophone Cultures (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course consists of an in-depth study of selected literary texts and other cultural artifacts (such as films, newspapers, magazines) that underline the traditional and contemporary aspects of Francophone culture. Laboratory work will be mandatory.
  
  •  

    FRE 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    FRE 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    FRE 5555 - History of the French Language (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Study of the evolution of French from Latin to its present form; internal developments and external influences. Study of phonology, morphology and syntax of Old French and reading of selected Old French texts.
  
  •  

    FRE 5565 - Advanced French Expression (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Students will have the opportunity to advance their oral and written proficiencies by examining and using different registers of contemporary spoken French as well as analyzing different written genres. Their oral work will be based on reading and discussing current articles from newspapers and periodicals; their written work will be modeled on selected literary and cultural narratives written by experienced French writers.
    Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing and FRE 3080 (Advanced Grammar and Composition), or consent of the instructor.
    [Dual- listed with FRE 4565.]
  
  •  

    FRE 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. FRE 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  
  •  

    FRE 5999 - Thesis (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.

Geography

  
  •  

    GHY 5000 - Research Themes in Geography (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Study of the historical, ongoing, and emerging research themes in geography; the students will examine and practice the processes of organizing research, synthesizing the literature, and presenting research results in written and oral formats.
  
  •  

    GHY 5015 - Climate Change: Physical Science Basis (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Students will acquire the scientific background and develop the skills necessary to understand elements of climate change. The course will include a comprehensive assessment of climate change detection, attribution, and future climate projections at multiple spatiotemporal scales. Major topics will include observations of climate change in the atmosphere, ocean, and the cryosphere, and at the surface; information from paleoclimate archives; tropical cyclones and extreme weather; carbon and other biogeochemical cycles; clouds and aerosols; anthropogenic and natural radiative forcing; and sea level change.
  
  •  

    GHY 5025 - Climate and Society (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This is an applied climate science course with the aim of providing a broad working knowledge of how climate intersects with society across a wide range of sectors, including agriculture, water resources, air quality, energy, and human health. In this project based course, students will apply data and techniques to understand how climate impacts social and environmental systems. This course is designed to help students develop problem-solving strategies, technical skills, and disciplinary knowledge in applied climate science.
  
  •  

    GHY 5100 - Seminar in Physical Geography (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An exploration of special problems related to physical geography with emphasis placed on their impact on the human environment. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat this course for credit.
  
  •  

    GHY 5110 - Seminar in Spatial Analysis (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An exploration of unique problems related to one component of spatial analysis: cartography, remote sensing, quantitative/qualitative research methods, geographic information systems, or regional analysis. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat this course for credit.
  
  •  

    GHY 5130 - Seminar in Human Geography (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An exploration of special problems related to human geography with emphasis placed on spatial patterns and processes. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat this course for credit.
  
  •  

    GHY 5150 - Seminar in GIScience (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides a fundamental understanding of the research field of geographic information science (GIScience) through reading and discussing current and seminal articles and book chapters. Topics include the theoretical foundations for GIScience, the impacts of geospatial technology on society, and methodological and application issues. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat this course for credit.
  
  •  

    GHY 5301 - Regional Geography (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    An in-depth examination of the world from a regional perspective with special attention given to conceptual topics such as world population growth, economic development and environmental problems.
  
  •  

    GHY 5312 - GIS Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The study of management issues, technological and management perspectives, and organizational settings necessary for developing a successful geographic information system - GIS can vary from a single-user workstation with a sole purpose to a complex multi-user, multi-department system, with different hardware and software environments, varied data requirements and standards for a variety of applications. These complexities and the manager’s perspective cover a wide array of GIS related topics.
  
  •  

    GHY 5400 - Planning Theory and Process (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Foundations of community and regional planning, including linkages with planning theory and growth management, comprehensive planning steps, and how practicing planners use various planning aspects and applications to address contemporary urban and regional issues.
    (Same as PLN 5400 .)
  
  •  

    GHY 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    GHY 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    GHY 5620 - Atmospheric Circulation (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Alternate years
    This course focuses on atmospheric circulation at multiple spatial scales. Basic meteorological elements and concepts such as precipitation formation, jet streams, cyclogenesis, and extreme weather are discussed. The course also investigates the major teleconnection patterns of El Niño-Southern Oscillation, Arctic Oscillation, and Madden-Julian Oscillation and their associated regional and global impacts.
    [Dual- listed with GHY 4620.]
  
  •  

    GHY 5800 - Advanced Quantitative Methods in Geography (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course will examine quantitative procedures commonly used in the analysis of geographic and planning research problems, including research in both human and physical geography. The course focus will be on applications of quantitative procedures in research, but conceptual and theoretical aspects of all procedures will be discussed. Students will apply quantitative methods to a geographic topic and will report on the results in a professional quality paper.
    Prerequisite: GHY 3800 (Introduction to Quantitative Methods) or the equivalent.
    Prerequisite: GHY 3800 (Introduction to Quantitative Methods) or the equivalent.
  
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    GHY 5810 - Digital Image Processing (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Course focuses on acquisition of digital images, image processing, image enhancement techniques for interpretation, and applications of remote sensing technology.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. [Dual-listed with GHY 4810.]
  
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    GHY 5812 - Advanced GIS (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    GIS is a wide ranging topic encompassing five distinct functions within a total system context. These functions are: 1) data input, 2) data storage, 3) data management, 4) data manipulation and analysis, and 5) data output. Emphasis will be placed on the applications frequently found in geography and planning. This course is project oriented to give the student maximum experience in each of the functions of a GIS and to allow the student to associate the technical areas of GIS with “real world” scenarios.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. [Dual-listed with GHY 4812.]
  
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    GHY 5814 - Principles of GeoComputation (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    GeoComputation is spatial analysis with or without a geographic information system (GIS). The increasing power of computational environments enables the creation of new methods for analyzing geographic data. This course will include: an introduction to GeoComputational theory, GIS programming, and applications of GIS and environmental models.
    Prerequisite: GHY 3812 (Introduction to GIS) or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. [Dual-listed with GHY 4814.]
  
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    GHY 5820 - Geographical Hydrology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Study of the occurrence and movement of water on the earth, with a focus on applications of surface hydrology. Water movement through the hydrologic cycle, flood analysis, and water use/water policy are emphasized.
    [Dual-listed with GHY 4820.]
  
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    GHY 5858 - Directed Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Directed research on a topic selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. The student will write a research paper and present findings orally on the selected topic. Students may not repeat GHY 5858 for credit.
    Prerequisite: approval of the instructor.
    (Same as PLN 5858 .)
  
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    GHY 5900 - Internship in Geography (3-12)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    The internship emphasizes field work in the areas of locational analysis, environmental assessment and impact, and/or land use planning. For the Master of Arts (teacher licensure program) the internship involves teaching one or more geography courses in an appropriate setting. The type of internship, location of field experience, and sponsoring agency must be satisfactory to the student and to the department. A research paper is required.
  
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    GHY 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. GHY 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  
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    GHY 5998 - Thesis Preparation (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    The student develops the thesis proposal, carries out research for the thesis topic, and meets regularly with the thesis advisor to develop the thesis. First half of a two-semester thesis requirement; the student also must complete GHY 5999 . GHY 5998 may be repeated, but only three semester hours of credit may be applied to a graduate Program of Study.
 

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