Jun 20, 2018  
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin 
    
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

College of Arts and Sciences


Neva Specht, Dean
Dru Henson, Associate Dean
Jennifer Burris, Associate Dean

http://cas.appstate.edu

The College of Arts & Sciences at Appalachian State University is home to 16 academic departments, two academic programs, two centers and one residential college spanning the humanities and the social, mathematical and natural sciences. The college is dedicated to providing instruction and research essential to the University’s mission and seeks to cultivate the habits of inquiry, learning and service among all its constituents.

Department of Anthropology

anthro.appstate.edu

Timothy Smith, Chair

Courses

Anthropology

  •  

    ANT 5120 - Appalachian Culture and Social Organization (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Exploration of dominant cultural principles and values and their relationship to historical, economic, and political themes, and to social organization and social dynamics; analysis of the socio-economic structure of Appalachian communities, and of the meaning of kinship and its relationship to community organization and processes.
  •  

    ANT 5200 - Sustainable Development: Theory, Method and Case (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    A seminar on the social theory and applied methods of project interventions in communities and regions. A survey of relevant economic and ecological theory and assistance in developing a comprehensive research proposal.
  •  

    ANT 5410 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An introduction to the art of ethnographic fieldwork and research design. Topics include ethnographic methods, proposal writing, and research ethics. Students will carry out an original research project during the course using methods such as participant-observation, interviewing, focus group work, and audio and visual documentation.
  •  

    ANT 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    ANT 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An opportunity to study a special topic or combination of topics not otherwise provided for in the anthropology curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
  •  

    ANT 5565 - Agrarian Studies and Rural Development (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Theoretical and descriptive analysis of peasants, small farmers and corporate agribusinesses through political economic and cultural perspectives in the context of globalization. Explores agrarian social movements and prospects for more just and sustainable outcomes from a comparative perspective. A research paper reflecting theory, method and case development is required.
    [Dual-listed with ANT 4565.]
  •  

    ANT 5600 - Medical Anthropology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of health, illness, and the treatment of disease from a cross-cultural perspective. Includes discussion of various theories of illness, types of healers, and the empirical basis for folk medicine and alternative forms of therapy.
  •  

    ANT 5610 - Ethnographic Field School (2-6)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Students will be immersed in a cultural setting and learn to use standard ethnographic techniques to analyze and interpret the culture. There will be instruction in the use of qualitative methods, such as observation, mapping, genealogies and life histories, formal interviewing, and cultural domain analysis. Students will design and carry out an ethnographic research project.
  •  

    ANT 5900 - Field Experience: Internship (3-12)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Supervised placement in a setting which provides an opportunity to observe and practice anthropological skills.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    ANT 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. ANT 5989 does not count toward a degree.
    Graded on an S/U basis.

Center for Appalachian Studies

appstudies.appstate.edu

William Schumann, Center Director
schumannwr@appstate.edu

Dave Wood, Graduate Program Director
wooddh@appstate.edu

The Culture and Music concentration focuses on scholarship and research in the social sciences, humanities, and fine and applied arts, seeking to deepen understanding of the Appalachian socio-cultural and historical experience. The concentration also focuses on scholarly treatment of regional music traditions, including ballads, shape-note songs, traditional string bands, bluegrass, gospel, and country, including the African-American as well as European-American traditions.

The Sustainability in Appalachia concentration is based on applied research and interdisciplinary course work spanning the social and natural sciences as well as the humanities. It provides a foundation for those students who seek to meet the needs of present generations without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. For students interested in Appalachian and other highland and rural peoples, as well as other peoples threatened by the results of unsustainable practices and patterns, this course of study provides the background in the search for sustainable solutions.

Programs

Master of Arts

Graduate Certificate

Graduate Minor

Courses

Appalachian Studies

  •  

    A S 5000 - Bibliography and Research (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Instruction and study in bibliographical problems and types of source materials available in Appalachian topics; methods used in locating and evaluating the sources and in reporting of research. Required in the first semester of beginning graduate students.
  •  

    A S 5005 - Global Appalachia (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Introduces students to comparative mountain studies using the Appalachian Mountains as a focal point. The course places the Appalachian Mountains and Appalachian studies within an international context, considering how mountain cultures, economies, and societies around the world interact with regional, national, and international powers. Students consider how Appalachia compares to and contrasts with other mountain regions.
  •  

    A S 5015 - Old Time Music Traditions (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    A multi-cultural study of old time music and its roots, with interdisciplinary approaches from the humanities and social sciences.
    Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with AS 4015.]
  •  

    A S 5020 - Colloquium in Appalachian Studies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A team-taught interdisciplinary colloquium which will examine contemporary regional, state, and national issues that affect the Appalachian region. The course is designed to help students understand the Appalachian region from a multidisciplinary perspective. The course should be taken by the student during the last semester of residence in the program.
  •  

    A S 5025 - Pedagogy for Appalachian Studies (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A course designed for graduate teaching assistants responsible for teaching Appalachian Studies courses. Students will learn strategies for effective teaching in face-to-face, online, and hybrid college classrooms and will develop skills in constructing a syllabus; writing learning objectives; structuring reading and writing assignments; and assessing student outcomes. Participants will be introduced to educational philosophies for college-level teaching, will learn about current issues in the teaching of Appalachian Studies, and will learn how to access teaching resources.
  •  

    A S 5030 - Bluegrass Traditions (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    The genesis of bluegrass music, through its major redefinition in the mid-1970s, to its diverse interpretations today.
    Lecture three hours.
  •  

    A S 5035 - Local Music Traditions (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    This seminar explores and defines musical styles related to folk and popular musics in Northwestern North Carolina in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
  •  

    A S 5040 - Documentary Field Research Methods (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides students the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of field research in Appalachian Studies. During this course, students will be introduced to the history of documentary as field research and are required to complete a set of writing assignments to demonstrate their understanding of this history. Students will also complete a series of exercises to build their multimedia skills. Students must then use best practices in field research to develop a final project. The expectation is that this final product will connect to thesis research, or become part of a professional presentation or published article. Topics will include oral histories, folklore, and community organizing.
  •  

    A S 5050 - Qualitative Research Methods (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course trains students in social scientific research methods with an emphasis on qualitative ethnographic research and research design. Course readings survey the research strategies of participant observation, questionnaire design, interview techniques, sampling, ethnographic writing, and research applications in Appalachia. Students will develop ethnographic research projects as part of the course.
  •  

    A S 5060 - Community Based Research (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years.
    This course teaches engaged, student-based research with a non-profit and/or local government partner. Students will explore applied research and project management skills in support of the strategic goals of a community-based organization. Course readings and workshops will complement on-site research projects and a public research presentation to project partners and community stakeholders.
  •  

    A S 5065 - Sustainability and the Arts in Appalachia (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course explores theory and practice in the growing field of sustainability and the arts as it applies to the Appalachian region. Students will study global cultural theory in the fields of ethnomusicology, creative placemaking, and the arts. This theoretical approach will be grounded in participatory projects supporting local cultures.
  •  

    A S 5110 - Ethnographic Field Study (1-6)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Variable content. Course involves immersion in a field setting either in the U.S. or through study abroad. Topics, approach, and field sites will be indicated on course syllabi and semester schedules. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
  •  

    A S 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    A S 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    A S 5900 - Internship (1-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    A S 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. A S 5989 does not count toward a degree.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    A S 5998 - Thesis Preparation (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Students complete principal research for a thesis topic, meet regularly with a thesis advisor, and revise and defend the thesis prospectus.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    A S 5999 - Thesis (3-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.

Department of Biology

biology.appstate.edu

Zack Murrell, Interim Chair 
murrellze@appstate.edu

Ece Karatan, Graduate Program Director
karatane@appstate.edu

The graduate program is designed to prepare men and women for competitive careers and continued training in the field of biology. Our students graduate with the scientific skills for careers in environmental, biomedical, and educational fields and with foundational training for further education at the doctoral and professional levels. The program provides students with a comprehensive knowledge of broad fields and disciplines in biology while also allowing specialization in an area of their choice. In recent years, the Graduate Program in Biology has been twice named the Outstanding Graduate Program at Appalachian State University, and our graduate students routinely compete for and are awarded grants or scholarships for their proposed and ongoing research. The quality of thesis research conducted by biology graduate students is regularly recognized by the university, and our students often receive thesis awards from the Cratis D. Williams School of Graduate Studies.

Programs

Master of Science

Courses

Biology

  •  

    BIO 5000 - Bibliography and Research (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of scientific writing and oral presentations using exercises in writing and speaking. Skills in searching the literature, presenting papers in specific formats, and reviewing science writing will be developed. Students are required to attend and critique science seminars and to develop a presentation using modern computer technologies to present before fellow students. Required in the first year of graduate study.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  •  

    BIO 5202 - Organismal Ecology (4)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    The study of the relationships among individual organisms and the biotic and abiotic environments. Structure/function relationships will be emphasized throughout the course. Topics to be covered include: energy budgets; gas exchange by plants and animals; resource acquisition; water relations; and morphological, physiological and behavioral adaptations to environmental selection pressures. Lab will cover techniques of measuring gas exchange in both animals and plants; nutrient uptake; water relations; foraging efficiencies and physiological optima; and techniques in microclimate measurement.
    Prerequisites: BIO 3302 (Ecology) and either BIO 3301 (Human Systems Physiology) or BIO 5555 .
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  •  

    BIO 5212 - Population Ecology (4)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    This course will employ genetic and ecological principles to explore the population dynamics of plants and animals. The role of populations in evolutionary and ecological processes will be emphasized. Topics will include conservation and loss of genetic variation in natural populations; growth and regulation of populations; and factors affecting their demography, distribution and abundance. Labs will include models of growth and regulation along with techniques for analysis of populations in the field.
    Prerequisites: BIO 3302 (Ecology).
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  •  

    BIO 5222 - Communities and Ecosystem Ecology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A holistic consideration of the interactions among populations of different species with their biotic and abiotic environments. Topics to be covered include succession; patterns in species diversity; community productivity; biogeochemical cycling; ecosystem structure and function. Labs will involve studies of net primary production, nutrient cycling, succession, and diversity, and will include both laboratory and field work.
    Prerequisite: BIO 3302 (Ecology).
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  •  

    BIO 5240 - Aquatic Biology (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course will introduce students to the foundations, key concepts and current topics in freshwater, estuarine, marine and groundwater biology, ecology and management. Students will learn about how these ecosystems are tied to all of earth’s life forms and ecosystems as well as humanity’s role in global water cycles. Laboratory sessions will be used to develop computer, bench and field skills key to the study of aquatic ecosystems. Students will learn from and interact with personnel from state and federal resource-management agencies, nongovernment organizations and other stakeholders and develop skills essential to a career as an aquatic scientist.
    Prerequisites: An undergraduate course in ecology or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours. Lab three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4240.]
  •  

    BIO 5250 - Current Topics in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This seminar is designed to encourage students to delve more deeply into the ecological and evolutionary literature, with a focus on current issues. The students will be required to interpret the results of recent literature (published within the last year), and to present those findings to other students and faculty. Students will be asked to do one or two presentations per semester, to critique the other students, and to engage in discussion of all the papers read. Course content changes each offering. May be repeated for a total credit of 12 semester hours.
  •  

    BIO 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    BIO 5502 - Freshwater Ecology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the abiotic and biotic factors that influence the distribution and abundance of species in freshwater communities. Laboratory exercises include field trips to local streams and lakes.
    Prerequisites: BIO 1101 (Biology in Society I) and BIO 1102 (Biology in Society II); BIO 2000 (Intro to Botany), BIO 2001 (Intro to Zoology), BIO 3302 (Ecology) or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  •  

    BIO 5504 - Taxonomy of Vascular Plants (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    A study of the gross structure, reproduction, and development of the spermatophytes. Special emphasis is placed upon the classification and nomenclature of the spermatophytes.
    Lecture two hours, field work two hours.
  •  

    BIO 5505 - Nature Study (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Study of common plants and animals with emphasis on ecology, collecting techniques and identification. Designed for students with limited biology backgrounds. Not open to biology majors for credit.
    [Dual-listed with BIO 4550.]
  •  

    BIO 5506 - Advanced Animal Physiology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A comprehensive study of the physiology of the nervous, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory and endocrine systems with an emphasis on system coordination and integration. Laboratory experiments, readings and reports.
    Prerequisite: a course in general physiology or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  •  

    BIO 5507 - Comparative Invertebrate Physiology (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides a comprehensive study of physiological processes in invertebrate animals, with emphasis on adaptations to differing life history strategies. The principal goal of the course is to contribute significantly to the student’s understanding of basic biological theory. Some prior knowledge of cellular physiology, classification, and morphology of invertebrates will be assumed.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  •  

    BIO 5508 - Biogeography (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The biological, climatological, geographic, and geological factors which affect the distribution of animal and plants. Patterns of distribution will be studied in relation to various sizes of geographical units.
    Lecture three hours.
  •  

    BIO 5512 - Local Flora (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    A study of the common flora and economic plants of North Carolina including collection, identification, and methods of preservation.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory and field work two hours.
  •  

    BIO 5513 - Plant Molecular Biology (4)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    A study of molecular aspects of plant life, examining features that distinguish plants from other organisms on a cellular and molecular level. The laboratory introduces methods and applications of modern plant science and biotechnology. Students should be familiar with the basic concepts of molecular biology and plant genetics and have some experience in molecular laboratory techniques.
    Prerequisites: BIO 3800 (Molecular Biology) or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4513.]
  •  

    BIO 5514 - Plant Anatomy and Morphology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A general survey of the external and internal structure of plants; detailed study of anatomy and morphology of representative plants from all the divisions.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours.
  •  

    BIO 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    BIO 5551 - Ornithology (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    The morphology, physiology, behavior, ecology and identification of birds. Early morning field trips are required. Extended field trips to a variety of habitats will be arranged. Lecture and laboratory will emphasize techniques of observing, recording and analyzing data using a research project format.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4551.]
  •  

    BIO 5552 - Entomology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the insects, including relevant anatomy for identification and physiology for function, with a special emphasis on the ecological roles of insects and their interaction with other organisms. Evolutionary relationships with related arthropods are also covered. Basic taxonomy of the major insect groups is addressed with a required insect collection, which teaches collecting and preservation techniques. Students are involved in basic experimentation that allows for investigating this very diverse animal group.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual listed with BIO 4552.]
  •  

    BIO 5555 - Plant Physiology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the basic principles of plant physiology and fundamental processes such as cell properties, water relations, growth, photosynthesis, respiration, and mineral nutrition.
    Prerequisites: CHE 1101 (Intro to Chemistry I), CHE 1110 (Intro to Chemistry Laboriatory I), CHE 1102 (Intro to Chemistry II), CHE 1120 (Intro to Chemistry Lab II) and CHE 2201 (Organic Chemistry I) is strongly recommended.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4555.]
  •  

    BIO 5556 - Mycology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    An investigation of the fungi with particular reference to the techniques of working with these organisms.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4556.]
  •  

    BIO 5557 - Ichthyology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course focuses on the ecology, evolution and diversity of fishes. Aspects of fish physiology and behavior will also be covered along with important conservation issues. In the laboratory, students will have the opportunity to learn how to identify major groups of fishes with emphasis on freshwater species.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual listed with BIO 4557.]
  •  

    BIO 5558 - Taxonomy of the Fleshy Fungi (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An in-depth study of the fleshy fungi [mushrooms (agarics), chanterelles, hydnums, polypores, and corals] with an emphasis on morphology, systematics, and ecology. Methods of collection, macroscopic and microscopic dissection, identification, and preservation are covered. Fields trips are required.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4558.]
  •  

    BIO 5559 - Mammalogy (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    The natural history, distribution, adaptations, taxonomy and economic importance of mammals. Field trips and visits to zoos will be arranged.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4559.]
  •  

    BIO 5560 - Herpetology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    The history, morphology, systematics, physiology, and distribution of amphibians and reptiles. Methods of collecting, storing, studying and identifying specimens as well as behavioral aspects of species in their natural habitats will be covered. Field trips will be required.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4560.]
  •  

    BIO 5563 - Biology of Aging (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    General study of biological/physiological changes over time in the structure and function of the systems of organisms with emphasis on the human body.
    Prerequisites: BIO 1101 (Biology in Society I) and BIO 1102 (Biology in Society II), or equivalent.
    Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4563.]
  •  

    BIO 5564 - Microscopy (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the principles and techniques of biological microscopy. Lectures include discussions on preparative techniques for various types of bioimaging, the optical theories behind the imaging technologies, and the structure and function of cellular organelles. Laboratories examine practical techniques of tissue preparation for various kinds of microscopy, the effective use of various types of microscopes, and the interpretation of data obtained from various imaging systems.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4564.]
  •  

    BIO 5567 - Lichenology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of the morphology, diversity, evolution, ecology, physiology, and chemistry of lichens as well as their significance as biological indicators. Field trips are required.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4567.]
  •  

    BIO 5568 - Immunology (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the immune system with emphasis on cellular interactions involved in the generation of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Lecture includes discussions on inflammation, antibody diversity, tissue transplantation, and immunopathologies. Laboratories examine lymphoid tissue organization, lymphocyte function, and antibody-antigen reactions with emphasis on clinical application.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4568.]
  •  

    BIO 5569 - Invertebrate Zoology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    Students will be introduced to the 34 extant major and minor invertebrate phyla which make up 99% of the Earth’s named animal species and virtually 100% of those animals yet undiscovered. The intriguing natural history, symmetry and development, mode of locomotion, nutrition, reproduction, and primary environments of the invertebrates will be discussed. Labs will emphasize invertebrate habitats, field collection, phylogenetic relationships as well as ecological and physiological adaptations and examination of major morphological characteristics.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours with required field trips. [Dual-listed with BIO 4569.]
  •  

    BIO 5570 - Parasitology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A survey of protozoan, helminthic and arthropod parasites with emphasis on organisms of medical and veterinary importance.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4570.]
  •  

    BIO 5571 - Plant-Insect Interactions in Terrestrial Ecosystems (4)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    A study of the associations between insects and plants, using lecture, class discussions and laboratory exercises. Lecture topics include constraints imposed by plants on herbivorous insects and the strategies insects use to overcome them, pollination biology and ecology and the interplay between biotic and abiotic factors in determining interactions. Students are expected to lead class discussions of current literature. Laboratory exercises are field-based mini-experiments leading to the development of an individual project with experimentation and paper presentation. As a graduate student, mentoring of undergraduate research projects is required.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4571.]
  •  

    BIO 5572 - Virology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The objective of this course is to introduce students to the principles of virology as related to the structure, biochemistry, replication, pathogenesis and control of viruses. There will be an emphasis on disease processes and the interaction of animal viruses. General topics include the chemical and physical properties of viruses, virus classification, cultivation and assay of viruses, pathogenesis, persistent infections, biotechnology, and viruses as a cause of neoplasia. The students’ analytical and intuitive skills will be challenged by analyzing figures and data from journal articles in class discussions.
    Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4572.]
  •  

    BIO 5575 - Ecotoxicology (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course introduces the various classes of toxicants, their fate within organisms and ecosystems, and the chemical transformations and mechanisms of toxicity. This course will also introduce students to standard lab and field toxicity tests, analysis of toxicity and quantification of toxins, data reduction and analysis, and the power of statistical analyses to identify significant effects. A case study approach will be utilized in lecture and labs to examine the toxic effects of heavy metals, organic compounds, insecticides, and environmental endocrine disrupters. Students will learn about important endpoints and bio-indicators of toxin exposure specific to each class of toxin and how they are used in ecological risk assessment. A service-learning component of the course will require students to design, write a mock grant proposal for, and lead a group toxicology project with a local community partner.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours with some required field trips. [Dual-listed with BIO 4575.]
  •  

    BIO 5601 - Animal Behavior-Ethology (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    Basic principles of animal behavior are approached from an evolutionary perspective. Topics such as instinct, learning, biological clocks, sociobiology, communication and physiological mechanisms of behavior are stressed. Laboratory emphasizes techniques of observing, recording, and analyzing behavior using a research project format.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4601.]
  •  

    BIO 5650 - Bioinformatics (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An introduction to computational molecular and cellular biology. Students will have the opportunity to learn how to mine biological databases for information; retrieve, analyze, and compare biological sequence data; and predict sequence features and relationships using computational tools.
    Prerequisite: BIO 3800 (Molecular Biology) or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours.
  •  

    BIO 5700 - Advanced Cell Biology (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    Prerequisite: a class in cell biology, molecular biology, or biochemistry or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours.
  •  

    BIO 5710 - Genomics (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An exploration of how genomic information is obtained; new insights gained from this information into the workings of life at the molecular, cellular and organismal level; and how this information is being used to understand evolution, symbiosis, pathogenesis, effectiveness of vaccines, cancer diagnosis and treatment, and other current issues.
    Prerequisites: BIO 3800 (Molecular Biology) with a grade of “C” or higher in each, or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours.
  •  

    BIO 5720 - Gene Regulation (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An exploration of the molecular principles underlying the regulation of the expression of a gene in the context of the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology. Topics include: the Central Dogma, DNA structure and packaging, general transcription, and cis and trans regulatory elements and factors.
    Prerequisites: BIO 3800 (Molecular Biology) with a grade of “C” or higher in each, or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours.
  •  

    BIO 5777 - Biostatistics (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    An introduction to biological statistics, both parametric and non-parametric, including descriptive statistics, probability, inference testing, hypothesis development, t-tests, ANOVA, regression, categorical data analysis and basic experimental design. Laboratory is designed to allow students to analyze data using the SAS system.
    Prerequisite: STT 2810 (Introduction to Statistics) or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.
  •  

    BIO 5900 - Internship (1-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Practical biological experiences in federal, state, and local agencies.
    Graded on an S/U basis. [Dual-listed with BIO 4900.]
  •  

    BIO 5980 - Instructional Methods in the Life Sciences (2)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course will provide training on effective pedagogy and communication skills for teaching assistants in the introductory biology program. In addition to the scientific principles of the weekly lab sessions, students in this course will be familiarized with the design of science lab content and the principles of developing effective assessment procedures. BIO 5980 may be repeated for two semester hours each semester; however, it cannot be counted toward the 30 semester hours minimum that are required for the Master of Science degree in Biology. Required of Graduate Teaching Assistants in their first year.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    BIO 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. BIO 5989 does not count toward a degree.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    BIO 5998 - Thesis Preparation (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course enables students to plan their master’s thesis project by examining the pertinent literature, developing the experimental design, and carrying out the proposed research. Extensive collaboration with the student’s thesis chair is expected. BIO 5998 may be repeated for 1-3 hours each semester, however, it cannot be counted toward the 30 semester hours minimum that are required for the Master of Science degree in Biology.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    BIO 5999 - Thesis (4 or 8)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Required in the program of study for the Master of Science degree in Biology.
    Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.
  •  

    BIO 6520 - Teaching Apprenticeship (4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides a teaching experience in undergraduate courses under direct supervision of a graduate faculty member. Specific objectives will be determined in a conference between the student and the graduate faculty member involved.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    BIO 6530-6549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    BIO 6610 - Advanced Seminar in Current Research Topics (2)


    When Offered: Spring
    Lectures, readings, and discussions dealing with biological principles and theories.
  •  

    BIO 6615 - Current Topics in Molecular Biology (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Seminar course exploring recent advances in Cell and Molecular Biology using primary literature published within the last six months. Course content changes each offering. BIO 6615 may be repeated for a total credit of 18 semester hours.
  •  

    BIO 6989 - Independent Research (1-8)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This elective course may be taken in blocks of 1-8 hours. Results of the research must be reported in a scientifically acceptable manner.
    Graded on an S/U basis.

General Science

  •  

    G S 5403 - Teaching Science in Middle and High Schools (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is for the prospective middle/high school science teacher and it focuses on effective instructional strategies for teaching principles associated with major school science disciplines. Emphasis is placed on planning, science process skills, inquiry-based instruction, hands-on/minds-on activities, improvising materials, demonstrations, and assessment techniques. Special emphasis is also placed on the North Carolina Standard Course of Study and the Next Generation Science Education Standards. A minimum of 15 hours of experience in public school classrooms will be required as part of this course.
    [Dual-listed with GS 4403.]
  •  

    G S 5404 - The Meaning and Nature of Science (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The goal of this course is to help students develop a sound understanding of the nature of science, the process of scientific inquiry, and the reciprocal relationship between science and society through a critical examination of the history of science since the Renaissance.
    [Dual-listed with GS 4404.]
  •  

    G S 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    G S 5510 - Environmental Problems (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of environmental problems: their historical and cultural origins, their scientific background, and their possible solutions. Designed for students with limited science backgrounds.
  •  

    G S 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    G S 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research. GS 5989 does not count toward a degree.

Department of Chemistry

chemistry.appstate.edu

Claudia Cartaya-Marin, Chair

Courses

Chemistry

  •  

    CHE 5070 - Advanced Physical Chemistry (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    Rigorous treatment of the laws of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Applications to gases, solutions and other condensed phases, studies of surface effects.
    Lecture four hours.
  •  

    CHE 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    CHE 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An opportunity to study a special topic or combination of topics not otherwise provided for in the chemistry curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
    Prerequisite: graduate status.
  •  

    CHE 5560 - Instrumental Methods of Analysis (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of some of the modern instrumental methods of analysis including electrochemistry, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectrometry, mass spectrometry and gas chromatography.
    Prerequisite: CHE 3301 (Physical Chemistry I).
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  •  

    CHE 5580 - Biochemistry I (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course covers the properties of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids and presents a brief introduction to enzymology. Major emphasis is on the chemistry of biological compounds. An introduction to intermediary metabolism is also presented.
    Prerequisite: BIO 1801 (Biological Concepts I); CHE 2101 (Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry) or CHE 2202 (Organic Chemistry II) with a minimum grade of “C-” (1.7).
    Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with CHE 4580.]
  •  

    CHE 5581 - Biochemistry I Laboratory (1)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Experimental investigations which supplement the study of the topics in biochemistry.
    Prerequisite: CHE 2203 (Organic Chemistry Lab I) (or equivalent);
    co- or prerequisite: CHE 5580  (or equivalent). [Dual-listed with CHE 4581.]
  •  

    CHE 5582 - Biochemistry II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course will cover the intermediary metabolism of amino acids, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. Metabolic pathways and their associated enzymes are emphasized.
    Prerequisite: CHE 4580 (Biochemistry) with a minimum grade of “C-” (1.7).
    Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with CHE 4582.]
  •  

    CHE 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  •  

    CHE 5999 - Thesis (4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring

Department of Computer Science

compsci.appstate.edu

Rahman Tashakkori, Chair
tashakkorir@appstate.edu

James Fenwick, Jr., Graduate Program Director
fenwickjb@appstate.edu

The Computer Science MS program is for students who would like to advance beyond the undergraduate level of professional competence or to prepare for future doctoral study. The curriculum includes a balance between theory and applications and is built upon a set of core courses that cover the breadth of the fundamental areas of computer science. Through an appropriate selection of concentration electives students engage a depth of study in a specialization of the discipline. The program normally can be completed in two years with the appropriate undergraduate education or work experience.

Programs

Master of Science

Courses

Computer Science

  •  

    C S 5100 - Seminar in Computer Science (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Discussion and presentation of current topics in computer science. Each student will make oral and written reports on the results of research conducted on an instructor approved topic. Professional development aspects are also covered, including resume writing and interviewing skills.
    Prerequisite: graduate status in computer science.
  •  

    C S 5110 - Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Algorithmic paradigms, worst-case and average-case analysis, recurrence relations, lower bounds, classes of P and NP, and NP-complete problems. Applications including sorting, searching, dynamic structures, set algorithms, graph algorithms, randomized algorithms, and pattern matching.
    Prerequisite: CS 3460 (Data Structures).
  •  

    C S 5120 - Applications of Graph Theory and Combinatorics (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Odd-numbered years
    Basic concepts of graph theory and combinatorics as they are applied in computer science, including such topics as connectivity, colorability, planarity, distribution of distinct and nondistinct objects, generating functions and recursion, partitions, Latin squares, and block designs.
    Prerequisite: CS 3460 (Data Structures).
  •  

    C S 5240 - Mobile Device Programming (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Odd numbered years
    Hands-on, experiential exposure developing applications for modern mobile devices. Topics include responsive web applications, web app to native app generation tools (e.g., PhoneGap), but primarily native app development for the Android or IOS platform. Native app development topics include basic application framework and process life cycle, user interface components, persistent data mechanisms, settings/preferences, services and notifications, and debugging. Advanced topics include publishing and updating apps to public distribution stores (e.g., AppleStore), and device-specific functions including gestures, accelerometer, GPS. Modern development tools are used including AndroidStudio or Xcode. Students work individually on prepared projects and a final cumulative project.
  •  

    C S 5245 - Data Programming (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Odd numbered years
    This course brings together students from different disciplines who are working (or want to work) in data science. For students without programming experience, a significant part of the course will be devoted to learning computer programming in a high-level programming language such as Python or Matlab. Students who already know how to program will also gain experience using machine learning and visualization packages for those languages. Other topics will be covered based on student interest such as web scraping, web APIs, recommendation engines, image processing, natural language processing, and graphical user interfaces. Novice programmers will be paired with experienced programmers to complete a class project.
  •  

    C S 5310 - Numerical Analysis With Computer Applications (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of methods of solving systems of linear and non-linear equations, differential equations and numerical integrations with emphasis on convergence properties and error analysis.
    Prerequisites: linear algebra, real variables, computer programming.
    Corequisite: MAT 5610 .
  •  

    C S 5435 - High Performance Database Systems (3)


    When Offered: Spring, Odd numbered years
    This database course places emphasis on some of the concepts of modern, high performance database systems that are beyond an introductory level. These concepts include Advanced Data Modeling and Design, NoSQL Database Systems, Distributed Database Systems, Object Oriented Database Systems, Query Optimization, and Database Administration and Security. Students will read relevant research articles and write papers on different topics throughout the semester and complete a final project as the product of learning.
    Prerequisite: C S 3430 or equivalent.
  •  

    C S 5440 - Topics in Artificial Intelligence (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    This course will cover such topics as natural language processing, automated theorem-provers, expert system shells, and machine learning. Student projects will involve advanced logic programming techniques.
    Prerequisite: CS 4440 (Artificial Intelligence).
  •  

    C S 5450 - Computer Networking (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Even-numbered years
    Computer network architectures. The Internet protocol suite including TCP, UDP, ICMP, and IP. Routing and congestion control. Network monitoring and management. Specification, design, and implementation of network protocols. Creation of a socket-based client/server distributed application.
    Prerequisite: CS 4450 (Data Communications and Networking).
  •  

    C S 5465 - Advanced Computer Graphics (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    Review of 2D coordinate systems, primitives and transformations. Anti-aliasing. Theory of light. Color models. Homogeneous coordinates and perspective transformations. Curve and surface representation. Solid modeling. Reflection and refraction. Image rendering. Visualization and 4D computer graphics. Parallel computer graphics hardware and algorithms.
    Prerequisite: CS 4465 (Computer Graphics).
  •  

    C S 5483 - Computer Architecture (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Even-numbered years.
    An in-depth study of current concepts in computer architecture, including such topics as concurrent execution, parallel architectures, RISC architectures, pipelined and array processors, data-flow machines, and special purpose processors.
    Prerequisite: CS 3482 (Computer Systems II).
  •  

    C S 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Individual students study topics of interest under the direction of a faculty member.
    Prerequisite: 12 hours of graduate credit in computer science.
  •  

    C S 5521 - Operating Systems (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An in-depth study of the design and implementation of operating systems including process management, memory management, file systems, and input/output.
    Prerequisite: Equivalent of C S 3482.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with C S 4521.]
  •  

    C S 5530-5549 - Selected Topics in Computer Science (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Topics of current interest in computer science not covered in existing courses. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  •  

    C S 5550 - Theoretical Computer Science (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Even-numbered years
    A rigorous treatment of some theoretical aspects of computer science including formal definition of the notion of an algorithm, abstract machines, and formal grammars.
    Prerequisite: CS 2490 (Intro to Theoretical Computer Science).
    [Dual-listed with CS 4550.]
  •  

    C S 5560 - Advanced Operating Systems (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Even-numbered years
    Principles of operating system design applied to state of the art computing environments such as object-oriented systems, multiprocessors, and distributed systems.
    Prerequisite: C S 5520 .
  •  

    C S 5569 - Human-Computer Interfaces (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Even-numbered years
    This course covers topics related to the design and evaluation of human-computer interfaces (HCI). Topics include: understanding the user audience, HCI architectures, design issues related to various interface components, measuring HCI usability, incorporating HCI design into system development, and social issues. Students are required to complete a group project in HCI presented in written form and orally to the class.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with CS 4570.]
  •  

    C S 5570 - Design and Analysis of User Interfaces (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Even-numbered years
    This course covers systematic methods for design, development, testing and evaluation of human-computer interfaces (HCI). Students are required to apply these concepts to a specific HCI problem. Current research topics in HCI are discussed.
    Prerequisite: C S 5569 .
  •  

    C S 5620 - Real-time Systems (4)


    When Offered: Spring.Odd-numbered years
    Real-time hardware and software. Analog and digital data acquisition and reduction. Real-time algorithms and data structures. Advanced programming concepts including double buffering, interrupts, signal handlers, processes and threads, inter-process communication, synchronization, and the operating system kernel.
    Prerequisite: CS 3482 (Computer Systems II).
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with CS 4620.]
  •  

    C S 5631 - Programming Language Translation (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Even numbered years
    Techniques for the translation of programming languages into an appropriate low-level format, including lexical analysis, top-down and bottom-up parsing, memory management. Each student will participate in the writing of a compiler.
    Prerequisites: C S 3481 or equivalent, and C S 3490 or equivalent.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours.
  •  

    C S 5666 - Software Engineering (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Methodical development of large software systems. Topics include: models, project life cycle, requirements and specification, structure charts and design criteria, incremental implementation, software metrics. Use of module and source code management, symbolic debugging, and project planning software. Students will participate in the realization of both group and individual software systems.
    Prerequisite: CS 3481 (Computer Systems I).
  •  

    C S 5667 - Advanced Software Engineering (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Odd-numbered years
    Review of the system life cycle. Software metrics. System engineering. Analysis and system specification. Object-oriented modeling. Computer-aided software engineering (CASE). Verification, validation and formal specification. Both individual and group projects are required.
    Prerequisite: C S 5666 .
  •  

    C S 5710 - Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery in Scientific Data (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Even-numbered years.
    Large quantities of data are collected in different studies and/or experiments in science, engineering, business, and medicine. The data contain significant amounts of useful information or knowledge that is often hard to discover without computational tools and techniques. This course focuses on techniques used in data mining tasks such as classification, association rule mining, clustering, and numerical prediction. The approach utilizes visualization, statistics, and neural networks. The goal is to study data mining as a means to achieve knowledge discovery in databases.
    Prerequisites: CS 1440 (Computer Science I) and Statistics.
  •  

    C S 5720 - Scientific Computing with Visualization (3)


    When Offered: Spring, Even-numbered years.
    Visualization plays a major role in understanding difficult concepts in different fields of science, engineering, medicine, and education. This course provides an opportunity to students from different disciplines to learn some visualization techniques that are applied to solve problems. The course uses several computational tools with visualization ability to solve problems and explore data from scientific fields, with emphasis on visualization of data, using available tools to build and understand computational models, and understanding and visualizing the solutions.
    Prerequisites: CS 1440 (Computer Science I) and Statistics.
  •  

    C S 5740 - Digital Image Processing (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides an opportunity for students to learn digital image processing techniques. Students apply these techniques to images from different fields of science, engineering, and medicine. The course covers image acquisition and display, properties of the human visual system, sampling and quantization, color image representations, image enhancement, image transformations, image compression, and image restoration.
    Prerequisites: CS 1440 (Computer Science I) with a grade of C or higher and MAT 2240 (Introduction to Linear Algebra).
    [Dual-listed with CS 4740.]
  •  

    C S 5800 - Project (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    In this course, students are required to work on an approved project under the guidance of a faculty advisor and/or the course instructor. Students are also required to prepare a written document and make an oral presentation about the project.
    Prerequisite: department approval.
  •  

    C S 5900 - Internship (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Independent, supervised work in computing for an approved agency, business, or organization.
    Prerequisite: prior approval of the departmental internship coordinator.
  •  

    C S 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  •  

    C S 5998 - Thesis Preparation (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    The student develops the thesis proposal, carries out research for the thesis topic, and meets regularly with the thesis advisor to develop the thesis. First half of a two-semester thesis requirement; the student also must complete C S 5999 . CS 5998 may be repeated, but only three semester hours of credit may be applied to a graduate Program of Study.
  •  

    C S 5999 - Thesis (6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisite: C S 5998 .

Department of Cultural, Gender and Global Studies

cgg.appstate.edu

Mark Nunes, Chair
nunesm@appstate.edu

Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies

gws.appstate.edu

Sushmita Chatterjee, Program Director
chatterjees@appstate.edu

The certificate allows students to seek training at the graduate level in women’s studies and get formal recognition for completing this training successfully.

The graduate minor allows students to engage in 9 hours of study at the graduate level in Gender Women’s and Sexuality Studies and to earn a minor that complements their graduate studies.

Programs

Graduate Certificate

Graduate Minor

Courses

Gender, Women's & Sexuality Studies

  •  

    GWS 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    GWS 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    GWS 5650 - Feminist Theories (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course surveys a wide range of contemporary feminist theories explaining the origins, dynamics, and transformation of gender-based inequalities. It examines the intellectual roots of modern feminist theories as well as feminist attempts to overhaul its intellectual roots. Students will be introduced to the connections between feminist theories and other academic debates, and they will also study political movements that reach beyond the oppression of women per se. This course examines not only the feminist revisions of and impact on academic discourse but also related intellectual trends and political movements such as postmodernism, deconstruction, poststructuralist theory, postcolonial theory, and critiques of liberalism, humanism, and Marxism.
  •  

    GWS 5700 - Seminar in Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Variable topic. This course provides in-depth study of one or more major figures, contemporary issues, movements, or debates about gender, women, or sexuality. May be repeated for credit if the content does not duplicate.
  •  

    GWS 5800 - Teaching Apprenticeship (1)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides an opportunity to gain experience teaching and developing course materials for an undergraduate course in Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies. Students will be supervised by a faculty member in Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies. This course may be repeated for a total credit of three semester hours.
    Prerequisite: GWS 5650 
  •  

    GWS 5900 - Internship (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Field work in community, government, non-profit, or professional agencies involved in or solving problems related to gender, women, or sexuality issues.

Interdisciplinary Studies

  •  

    IDS 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    IDS 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring, On Demand

Department of English

english.appstate.edu

Carl Eby, Chair
ebycp@appstate.edu

Susan Staub, Graduate Program Director
staubsc@appstate.edu

Bret Zawilski, Director of Graduate Certificate
zawilskibj@appstate.edu

Jessie Blackburn, Advisor of Graduate Certificate
blackburnjb@appstate.edu

NOTE: For every master’s program, students should plan a Program of Study with the Graduate Advisor in English during the first semester after enrollment. In all cases, a student must complete 24 hours in English on their program of study.

Programs

Master of Arts

Graduate Certificate

Graduate Minor

Courses

English

  •  

    ENG 5000 - Bibliography and Research (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of bibliographical problems, types of research organization and reporting of research. Required in the first semester for beginning graduate students. Required of all students.
  •  

    ENG 5123 - Teaching ENG 1100, Introduction to Literature (1)


    When Offered: Spring
    Theory and practice in teaching ENG 1100, Introduction to Literature. ENG 5123 counts toward the graduate certificate program in Rhetoric and Composition, but not for the Master of Arts degrees in English.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  •  

    ENG 5150 - Teaching Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years.
    An examination of the theory and practice of teaching literature courses as informed by recent pedagogical scholarship. This course is designed to prepare students to teach at the college level.
  •  

    ENG 5160 - Teaching Apprenticeship (1)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course provides a supervised experience in college teaching through direct participation in a classroom setting. Each student will work closely with a faculty mentor who is teaching an undergraduate course and will be actively engaged in the classroom. This course must be repeated for a total credit of two semester hours.
  •  

    ENG 5200 - Issues in Teaching English (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An advanced course in teaching theory and practice for secondary school teachers. Emphasis is placed on practical applications for the teaching of writing and literature.
  •  

    ENG 5400 - Appalachian Writing Project (6)


    When Offered: Summer Session.On Demand
    An intensive summer institute for kindergarten through college teachers interested in the teaching of writing. Explores composition theory with an emphasis on the connections among theory, practice, and pedagogy. Teachers will develop curriculum, collect resources, and re-connect as fully functioning writers. The Appalachian Writing Project is built upon the National Writing Project model.
  •  

    ENG 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Directed study of a topic not offered in regularly scheduled courses.
  •  

    ENG 5520 - Technical Writing (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    In this course, students conduct audience analyses, give oral presentations, and create documents representing a number of technical writing genres, including user manuals, instructions, and proposals.
  •  

    ENG 5525 - Product of Learning (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    ENG 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Content to vary; may be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
  •  

    ENG 5560 - Adolescent Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course introduces students to the varied and multi-cultural field of adolescent literature. Students focus on various genres, including realistic fiction, romance and adventure, science fiction/fantasy, autobiography, and poetry. Content includes pertinent criticism, important bibliographies, research studies, historical analysis, and increasingly sophisticated pedagogical resources. Students will use the works they read, current research, and web-based resources to create curricula appropriate for adolescent readers.
  •  

    ENG 5570 - Studies in American Indian Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Alternate years.
    Advanced study of major American Indian writers from oral traditions through the present.
    [Dual- listed with ENG 4570.]
  •  

    ENG 5585 - Studies in Ethnic American Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An advanced in-depth and multi-cultural examination of major ethnic American writers.
    [Dual-listed with ENG 4585.]
  •  

    ENG 5600 - Literary Criticism and Theory (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Alternate years
    A study of key issues in contemporary literary and cultural theory and in the history of literary criticism. Emphasis on practical applications of theoretical approaches. Offered alternate years with ENG 5660 .
  •  

    ENG 5640 - Cultural Studies (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    A study of literature as a cultural practice and of related cultural practices from the perspective of literature. Offered alternate years with ENG 5650 .
  •  

    ENG 5650 - Gender Studies (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    A critical study of the significance of gender in literature and other art forms. Offered alternate years with ENG 5640 .
  •  

    ENG 5660 - Advanced Seminar in Major Authors (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An intensive examination of a major author writing in English whose work is recognized as essential to a comprehensive understanding of literary culture and history. Offered alternate years with ENG 5600 .
  •  

    ENG 5710 - Advanced Folklore (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An in-depth and multi-cultural study of one or more folklore genres in cultural context with interdisciplinary approaches from the humanities and social sciences. It is recommended that ENG 3050 (Studies in Folklore) be taken prior to this course.
    [Dual-listed with ENG 4810.]
  •  

    ENG 5720 - Appalachian Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of major regional movements, genres, writers in the Appalachian mountains, from settlement to the present. Content and approach may vary.
    [Dual-listed with ENG 4720.]
  •  

    ENG 5760 - Studies in American Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An intensive study of selected United States literary forms, cultural concepts, or literary/artistic movements.
  •  

    ENG 5770 - Colonial and Federal American Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An intensive study in selected major authors from the founding of the English colonies through the early stage of the American Republic. Offered alternate years with ENG 5780 .
  •  

    ENG 5780 - Nineteenth-Century American Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An intensive study of the works of such major writers as Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, and Crane. Offered alternate years with ENG 5770 .
  •  

    ENG 5790 - Twentieth-Century American Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An intensive study of such major writers as Frost, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, and Hemingway.
  •  

    ENG 5810 - Chaucer (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    A critical study of The Canterbury Tales, other works selected from the Chaucer canon, and related medieval texts. Offered alternate years with ENG 5840 .
  •  

    ENG 5825 - Studies in Sixteenth-Century British Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    Studies in the literature of the British Isles published between 1485 and 1603, the years of the major Tudor monarchs. Writers covered could include Malory, More, Wyatt, Surrey, Elizabeth I, Shakespeare (as a lyric and narrative poet), Lyly, Kyd, Marlowe, Sidney, Raleigh, and Spenser.
  •  

    ENG 5835 - Studies in Seventeenth-Century British Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    Studies in the literature of the British Isles published between 1603 and 1680, the years of the Stuart monarchs and the Cromwellian Interregnum. Writers covered could include Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Herrick, Wroth, Bacon, Burton, Hobbes, Webster, Middleton, Ford, Marvell, Bunyan, and Milton.
  •  

    ENG 5840 - Shakespeare (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An intensive study of selected works from the Shakespeare canon. Offered alternate years with ENG 5810 .
  •  

    ENG 5865 - Eighteenth-Century British Studies (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An intensive study of selected topics of major literary interest during the period 1660-1800, e.g., Restoration Drama, the Tory Wits, and Johnson and his Circle.
  •  

    ENG 5870 - Romantic Period (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An intensive study of selected authors of the Romantic period considered in relation to general concepts of romanticism.
  •  

    ENG 5880 - Victorian Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    A study of selected British poetry, novels, or non-fiction prose of the latter part of the nineteenth century.
  •  

    ENG 5890 - Twentieth-Century British Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An intensive study of the works of such major writers as Yeats, Lawrence, and Joyce.
  •  

    ENG 5910 - World Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    A seminar in Western or non-Western literature read in English. Areas of focus may include Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas.
  •  

    ENG 5930 - Transnational Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    Advanced and comparative study of literature that crosses traditionally defined national boundaries.
  •  

    ENG 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  •  

    ENG 5998 - Thesis Preparation (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Students carry out principal research for a thesis topic, meet regularly with a thesis advisor, and revise and defend the thesis prospectus.
  •  

    ENG 5999 - Thesis (3-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring

Rhetoric & Composition

  •  

    R C 5100 - Composition Theory, Practice, and Pedagogy (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An introduction to composition theory and relevant rhetorical, reading, and psycholinguistic theory with an emphasis on the connections among theory, practice, and pedagogy. Required of teaching assistants.
  •  

    R C 5120 - Teaching in the Writing Center (1)


    When Offered: Fall
    Required of all graduate students working in the Writing Center.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  •  

    R C 5121 - Teaching Basic Writing (1)


    When Offered: Fall
    Theory and practice in teaching Basic Writing. Required of all graduate students teaching Basic Writing.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  •  

    R C 5122 - Teaching Expository Writing (1)


    When Offered: Fall
    Theory and practice in teaching Expository Writing. Required of all graduate students teaching Expository Writing.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  •  

    R C 5124 - Teaching Writing Across the Curriculum (1)


    When Offered: Spring
    Theory and practice in teaching Introduction to Writing Across the Curriculum. Required of all graduate students teaching introduction to Writing Across the Curriculum.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  •  

    R C 5300 - Studies in Rhetoric and Composition (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Alternate years
    A critical study of issues in rhetoric and composition. Content to vary; may be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
    Prerequisite: R C 5100  or R C 3450 (Writing Center Theory and Practice) or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    R C 5400 - Rhetorical Theory (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Even-numbered years.
    This course introduces students to contemporary rhetorical theories and to major trends and figures in the history of the rhetorical tradition.
  •  

    R C 5410 - Digital and Visual Rhetorics (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Alternate odd-numbered years.
    This course focuses on rhetorical practice as it is applied in digital environments.
  •  

    R C 5510 - Graduate Writing Workshop (1)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An introduction to writing formats in graduate study. May be repeated for additional credit.
  •  

    R C 5990 - Capstone in Rhetoric and Composition (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A substantial piece of writing addressing a specific concern in rhetoric and composition.
    Prerequisites: Composition Theory, Practice, and Pedagogy; Studies in Rhetoric and Composition; and permission of the instructor.

Department of Geography and Planning

geo.appstate.edu

Kathleen Schroeder, Chair
schroederk@appstate.edu

Baker Perry, Graduate Program Director
perrylb@appstate.edu

The graduate degree programs in Geography are designed to provide students with a broad range of academic and professional options. Foundations of the programs include preparing students for: 1) Ph.D. work in geography or planning, and 2) professional opportunities in applied geography and planning.

Past graduates have found jobs working in fields such as: geographic information science, environmental analysis and policy development, transportation planning, urban planning, satellite image analysis, cartography, regional planning and sustainable development, economic development, and land resource management.

Faculty and students are actively engaged in research investigating: climate change, biome change, GIS applications (viticulture; flood modeling; property valuation; visualization), globalization processes, economic development, community development, transportation and land use, precipitation climatology, mountain environments, and natural hazards.

The Department also offers graduate certificates in Planning and in GIScience for students interested in gaining proficiency in those areas without completing an entire degree. A third graduate certificate program in Climate Change has just be added starting Fall 2017. Completion of the certificate does not guarantee admission into the MA degree program.

Programs

Master of Arts

Graduate Certificate

Graduate Minor

Courses

Community & Regional Planning

  •  

    PLN 5030 - Planning for Climate Resilience (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    City planners have many tools to address the impacts of local growth, environmental protection, economics and social equity. What is currently lacking are plans that account for climate change and build the capacity for resilience and adaptation in the face of the negative outcomes. In this course, we will gain a better understanding of climate change and the ways in which the cultural and political discourse influences our capability to address the climate change challenge at the local, regional, national and international level.
    [Dual-listed with PLN 4030.]
  •  

    PLN 5240 - Sustainable Transportation Planning (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Not all transportation is cars. In order to create a sustainable transportation system planners understand how a transportation network that supports transit, biking, walking and cars in an interconnected and equitable manner can connect the built environment. Major topics include transportation policy and planning, environmental implications of transportation decisions, equity, technology, nonmotorized and group travel modes, active living and active travel, public health and strong communities, and emerging models.
    [Dual-listed with PLN 4240.]
  •  

    PLN 5400 - Planning Theory and Process (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Foundations of community and regional planning, including linkages with planning theory and growth management, comprehensive planning steps, and how practicing planners use various planning aspects and applications to address contemporary urban and regional issues.
    (Same as GHY 5400 .)
  •  

    PLN 5420 - Human Settlements and Planning History (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Foundations of community and regional planning relating to the growth and development of cities and historical aspects of planning. Examination of how design and form impact the built environment, to include prominent planners who have influenced planning over time. This course focuses on the American city, but some examples may be from European and Asian countries and colonial practices.
  •  

    PLN 5425 - Task-Oriented Group Facilitation Methods (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Learn how to maximize the collective power of groups, organizations, and communities by developing facilitation skills that help groups think, talk, and work together. Application opportunities using these skills include community development, organizational planning, education, government, and other occasions when people want to turn ideas into productive action and meaningful accomplishments.
    (Same as COM 5425 .)
  •  

    PLN 5431 - Planning Methods and Techniques (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Foundations of community and regional planning relating to skills, knowledge, and abilities that practicing planners use to develop a better understanding of place. Scope of research includes components of plan-making (e.g., public opinion surveying; meeting facilitation; and demographic, economic, social, environmental, housing, land use, circulation, and community facilities studies).
  •  

    PLN 5441 - Planning Studio (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Application of planning skills and knowledge to a project. Each studio will have a project focus that may vary (but typically will include comprehensive planning, physical design, economic development, or spatial planning). A real location, fieldwork, and problem-solving are integral parts of this course.
    Prerequisite: PLN 5431 .
  •  

    PLN 5450 - Inside the Sustainable City (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course explores the systems, planning practices, and individuals and organizations across sectors that make towns and cities work. The course considers examples-successes, failures and the more
    common mixed outcomes-of planning for sustainable communities, characterized by healthy environments, social justice and equity, and strong diverse economies. Major themes include poverty and wealth, production and consumption, conservation and ecosystem services, technology harnessed for sustainability, and individual and collective action. Systems studied include water, energy, waste, transportation, agriculture, construction and design, finance, education, governance, and more.
    [Dual-listed with PLN 4450.]
  •  

    PLN 5460 - Environmental Policy and Planning (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An in-depth look at issues of public participation and involvement, intergovernmental relations, and the tools and practices involved with environmental planning in the United States.
    [Dual-listed with PLN 4460.]
  •  

    PLN 5470 - Community Development: A Sustainable Approach (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Traditional models for community and economic development are giving way to 21st-century strategies using a sustainability framework that crosses temporal and spatial scales, and accounts for multiple dimensions of environment, economy and social equity. This course will explore and apply the language, tools and strategies employed by community development professionals, activists, and community members in urban and rural settings. Major topics include poverty and race, housing, economic opportunity, revitalization and gentrification, environmental justice, localism and globalism, and public participation in planning.
    [Dual-listed with PLN 4470.]
  •  

    PLN 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    PLN 5730 - Land Use Controls, Planning Law, and Ethics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Foundations of community and regional planning relating to plan implementation, including a spectrum of land use controls, the legal and constitutional framework of land use controls, and planning ethics.
  •  

    PLN 5858 - Directed Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Directed research on a topic selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. The student will write a research paper and present findings orally on the selected topic. Students may not repeat PLN 5858 for credit.
    Prerequisite: approval of the instructor.
    (Same as GHY 5858 .)

Geography

  •  

    GHY 5000 - Research Themes in Geography (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Study of the historical, ongoing, and emerging research themes in geography; the students will examine and practice the processes of organizing research, synthesizing the literature, and presenting research results in written and oral formats.
  •  

    GHY 5015 - Climate Change: Physical Science Basis (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Students will acquire the scientific background and develop the skills necessary to understand elements of climate change. The course will include a comprehensive assessment of climate change detection, attribution, and future climate projections at multiple spatiotemporal scales. Major topics will include observations of climate change in the atmosphere, ocean, and the cryosphere, and at the surface; information from paleoclimate archives; tropical cyclones and extreme weather; carbon and other biogeochemical cycles; clouds and aerosols; anthropogenic and natural radiative forcing; and sea level change.
  •  

    GHY 5025 - Climate and Society (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This is an applied climate science course with the aim of providing a broad working knowledge of how climate intersects with society across a wide range of sectors, including agriculture, water resources, air quality, energy, and human health. In this project based course, students will apply data and techniques to understand how climate impacts social and environmental systems. This course is designed to help students develop problem-solving strategies, technical skills, and disciplinary knowledge in applied climate science.
  •  

    GHY 5100 - Seminar in Physical Geography (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An exploration of special problems related to physical geography with emphasis placed on their impact on the human environment. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat this course for credit.
  •  

    GHY 5110 - Seminar in Spatial Analysis (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An exploration of unique problems related to one component of spatial analysis: cartography, remote sensing, quantitative/qualitative research methods, geographic information systems, or regional analysis. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat this course for credit.
  •  

    GHY 5130 - Seminar in Human Geography (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An exploration of special problems related to human geography with emphasis placed on spatial patterns and processes. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat this course for credit.
  •  

    GHY 5150 - Seminar in GIScience (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides a fundamental understanding of the research field of geographic information science (GIScience) through reading and discussing current and seminal articles and book chapters. Topics include the theoretical foundations for GIScience, the impacts of geospatial technology on society, and methodological and application issues. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat this course for credit.
  •  

    GHY 5301 - Regional Geography (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    An in-depth examination of the world from a regional perspective with special attention given to conceptual topics such as world population growth, economic development and environmental problems.
  •  

    GHY 5312 - GIS Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The study of management issues, technological and management perspectives, and organizational settings necessary for developing a successful geographic information system - GIS can vary from a single-user workstation with a sole purpose to a complex multi-user, multi-department system, with different hardware and software environments, varied data requirements and standards for a variety of applications. These complexities and the manager’s perspective cover a wide array of GIS related topics.
  •  

    GHY 5400 - Planning Theory and Process (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Foundations of community and regional planning, including linkages with planning theory and growth management, comprehensive planning steps, and how practicing planners use various planning aspects and applications to address contemporary urban and regional issues.
    (Same as PLN 5400 .)
  •  

    GHY 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    GHY 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    GHY 5620 - Atmospheric Circulation (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Alternate years
    This course focuses on atmospheric circulation at multiple spatial scales. Basic meteorological elements and concepts such as precipitation formation, jet streams, cyclogenesis, and extreme weather are discussed. The course also investigates the major teleconnection patterns of El Niño-Southern Oscillation, Arctic Oscillation, and Madden-Julian Oscillation and their associated regional and global impacts.
    [Dual- listed with GHY 4620.]
  •  

    GHY 5800 - Advanced Quantitative Methods in Geography (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course will examine quantitative procedures commonly used in the analysis of geographic and planning research problems, including research in both human and physical geography. The course focus will be on applications of quantitative procedures in research, but conceptual and theoretical aspects of all procedures will be discussed. Students will apply quantitative methods to a geographic topic and will report on the results in a professional quality paper.
    Prerequisite: GHY 3800 (Introduction to Quantitative Methods) or the equivalent.
    Prerequisite: GHY 3800 (Introduction to Quantitative Methods) or the equivalent.
  •  

    GHY 5810 - Digital Image Processing (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Course focuses on acquisition of digital images, image processing, image enhancement techniques for interpretation, and applications of remote sensing technology.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. [Dual-listed with GHY 4810.]
  •  

    GHY 5812 - Advanced GIS (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    GIS is a wide ranging topic encompassing five distinct functions within a total system context. These functions are: 1) data input, 2) data storage, 3) data management, 4) data manipulation and analysis, and 5) data output. Emphasis will be placed on the applications frequently found in geography and planning. This course is project oriented to give the student maximum experience in each of the functions of a GIS and to allow the student to associate the technical areas of GIS with “real world” scenarios.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. [Dual-listed with GHY 4812.]
  •  

    GHY 5814 - Principles of GeoComputation (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    GeoComputation is spatial analysis with or without a geographic information system (GIS). The increasing power of computational environments enables the creation of new methods for analyzing geographic data. This course will include: an introduction to GeoComputational theory, GIS programming, and applications of GIS and environmental models.
    Prerequisite: GHY 3812 (Introduction to GIS) or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. [Dual-listed with GHY 4814.]
  •  

    GHY 5820 - Geographical Hydrology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Study of the occurrence and movement of water on the earth, with a focus on applications of surface hydrology. Water movement through the hydrologic cycle, flood analysis, and water use/water policy are emphasized.
    [Dual-listed with GHY 4820.]
  •  

    GHY 5858 - Directed Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Directed research on a topic selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. The student will write a research paper and present findings orally on the selected topic. Students may not repeat GHY 5858 for credit.
    Prerequisite: approval of the instructor.
    (Same as PLN 5858 .)
  •  

    GHY 5900 - Internship in Geography (3-12)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    The internship emphasizes field work in the areas of locational analysis, environmental assessment and impact, and/or land use planning. For the Master of Arts (teacher licensure program) the internship involves teaching one or more geography courses in an appropriate setting. The type of internship, location of field experience, and sponsoring agency must be satisfactory to the student and to the department. A research paper is required.
  •  

    GHY 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. GHY 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  •  

    GHY 5998 - Thesis Preparation (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    The student develops the thesis proposal, carries out research for the thesis topic, and meets regularly with the thesis advisor to develop the thesis. First half of a two-semester thesis requirement; the student also must complete GHY 5999 . GHY 5998 may be repeated, but only three semester hours of credit may be applied to a graduate Program of Study.
  •  

    GHY 5999 - Thesis (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Second half of a two-semester thesis requirement; the student must first complete GHY 5998. GHY 5999 may be repeated, but only three semester hours of credit may be applied to the minimum number of hours required for the degree.
    Prerequisite: GHY 5998 .

Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences

geology.appstate.edu

William Anderson, Chair

Courses

Geology

  •  

    GLY 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    GLY 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    GLY 5630 - Hydrogeology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The occurrence of groundwater resources; factors governing groundwater movement through aquifers; and an analysis of techniques for measuring a water resource are the focus of this course. Groundwater contamination and remediation methods will be introduced.
    Prerequisites: a minimum of six semester hours of geology courses above the 1000 level, or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with GLY 4630.]
  •  

    GLY 5705 - Engineering Geology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Field and laboratory analysis of problems arising from interactions between humans and Earth and application of geologic knowledge to the mitigation of these problems.
    Prerequisites: a minimum of six semester hours of geology courses above the 1000 level, or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with GLY 4705.]
  •  

    GLY 5835 - Summer Field Geology (6)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    An intensive five to six week practicum in making geologic maps, measuring sections, and using other field techniques.
    Prerequisites: GLY 3150 (Principles of Structural Geology and Tectonics), GLY 3715 (Petrology and Petrography), and GLY 3800 (Intro to Stratigraphy and Sedimentology).
    [Dual-listed with GLY 4835.]

Department of Government and Justice Studies

gjs.appstate.edu

Phillip Ardoin, Chair
ardoinpj@appstate.edu

Graduate programs in the department are supervised by the departmental chair, the individual graduate program directors, and the graduate committee.

Political Science

polisci.appstate.edu

Rene Scherlen, Graduate Program Director
scherlenrg@appstate.edu

Tatyana Ruseva, Graduate Program Director
rusevat@appstate.edu

The Master of Arts program in political science is designed to prepare students for careers in a variety of government, educational, and private settings, and for further graduate work at the doctoral level. Students in our program may choose from one of three concentrations: American Government, Environmental Politics and Policy Analysis or International Relations/Comparative Politics. Our enrollment over the last 10 years has fluctuated between 15-20 students. With a student/faculty ratio of 3 to 1, we are able to provide our students with the individual attention they expect and deserve. While we have two basic curriculums, the interests and aspirations of our students are quite diverse and therefore we allow each student, in consultation with the Program Director, to develop a program of study which meets his or her unique interests and aspirations.

The American Government concentration promotes student understanding of the institutions of American Politics and the behavior of the public and political actors.

The Environmental Politics and Policy Analysis concentration promotes a multidisciplinary curriculum and provides students with the hard skills necessary for conducting analyses of environmental policy issues.

The International Relations/Comparative Politics concentration promotes student understanding of world politics and U.S. interactions with other nations.

While the issue content of each concentration varies, all three curriculums provide students with the methodological and analytic skills necessary for further graduate work at the doctoral level and careers in government, non-profit organizations, and the private sector.

Public Administration

mpa.appstate.edu

Mark Bradbury, Graduate Program Director
bradburymd@appstate.edu

Kathryn Webb Farley, Graduate Certificate Director
webbfarleyke@appstate.edu

Location of Program: This program is offered on campus in Boone in the format described in this Bulletin. Off-campus cohorts are started periodically, and follow a part-time extended program format. For information on upcoming off-campus cohorts, please contact the Office of Distance Education: distance.appstate.edu.

The MPA program is designed to ensure that students become proficient in the knowledge, skills and ethical values needed to become effective managers of public sector agencies (on the federal, state, and local levels) and not-for-profit organizations. Our graduates serve as town and county managers, economic developers, agency directors, and are employed in leadership roles in public safety and nongovernmental agencies. Over 400 graduates have completed the MPA degree at Appalachian since its inception in 1988.

Students in the MPA program are required to choose one of the following open concentrations:

  • Administration of Justice Concentration (279D): This concentration is designed to prepare persons for administrative/management positions in a variety of law enforcement, court, and correctional agencies at the local, state and federal levels.
  • Not-for-Profit Management Concentration (279F): This concentration is designed to prepare individuals for management and policy positions in governmental and not-for-profit organizations.
  • Public Management Concentration (279B): This concentration is designed to allow individuals to develop a program to suit specific needs in such areas as budget analyst, personnel administration, etc., or to prepare students with a generalist background in public administration.
  • Town, City and County Management Concentration (279C): This concentration is designed to prepare persons for managerial roles in towns, cities, and county governments or in organizations and agencies related to towns and counties.

Programs

Master of Arts

Master of Public Administration

Graduate Certificate

Courses

Criminal Justice

  •  

    C J 5000 - Research Methods (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The goal of this course is the development of the analytical abilities of the student. The foundations of inquiry, the various approaches to the study of social phenomena, and several analytical techniques are presented, discussed, and practiced.
    Prerequisite: an undergraduate statistics course.
  •  

    C J 5050 - Seminar in Public Law and Judicial Behavior (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years.
    An examination of the multiple roles of law and the judicial system in the formulation and execution of public policy, to include the role of the judiciary in politics and government with emphasis on variables affecting judicial decision making.
    (Same as P S 5050 .)
  •  

    C J 5060 - Administration of Justice (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of selected issues and problems in the administration of the justice system.
  •  

    C J 5150 - The American Justice System and Social Justice (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    This course is about possible relationships between criminal justice operations (law-making, law enforcement, adjudication, and punishment) and social justice.
  •  

    C J 5180 - Public Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An examination of the major forces that influence the formation, implementation and administration of public policy and methodological approaches to assess the impact of public policies.
    Prerequisite: C J 5000 .
    (Same as P A 5180 .)
  •  

    C J 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    C J 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    C J 5625 - Seminar in Police and Society (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to explore the role of the police in American society. Attention is given to the origins of policing, the nature of police organizations and police work, critical analysis of policing, and patterns of relations between the police and the public. The values of a democratic society as they affect the law enforcement role are also addressed.
  •  

    C J 5630 - Corrections: Theory and Application (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    A comprehensive examination of the theory, research, and policy pertinent to the administration and management of jails, prisons, and community corrections. Attention to the historical development of the American correctional system, the philosophies behind corrections and punishment, correctional systems and the inmate prison experience, personnel management, sentencing and its implications, community-based corrections, judicial intervention, and correctional reform. Special emphasis on the underlying social, legal, and ethical issues that affect various correctional strategies.
  •  

    C J 5660 - Crime, Theory and Policy (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years.
    An examination of crime policy and legislation and how theories of crime causation inform the formulation of crime policy. Attention will be given to research and how it can contribute to a more rational crime policy at the federal, state, and local level.
  •  

    C J 5661 - Court Administration (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to familiarize students with the need for, and approaches to, more effective management of federal and state courts. Topics include court reform, court unification, caseload management, alternative dispute resolution, personnel management and training, and audio-visual applications in the courts, among others.
    (Same as P S 5661 .) [Dual-listed with CJ 4661.]
  •  

    C J 5665 - Contemporary Criminological Theory (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A review and assessment of contemporary theories of criminology and criminal justice with emphasis on the state of empirical support and policy implications of these perspectives. Current influential theories will be evaluated and explored in the contexts of their major assumptions, causal structure, logical consistency, conceptual underpinnings, and empirical predictions.
  •  

    C J 5666 - The Criminal Court (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the structure, organization, and procedures found in the criminal courts throughout the United States. The course will focus on court procedures from arrest to appeals and will address system-wide issues affecting court systems as well as the role of and the discretion exercised by the individual court actors working in the system.
  •  

    C J 5670 - Crime Analysis and Criminal Justice Planning (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An examination of criminal justice policy and the formal and informal influences in the policy process. Planning is emphasized as a prelude to effective policy at the national, state and regional levels. A framework for the analysis of crime policy is offered for use in agency work.
  •  

    C J 5680 - Organized Crime (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    This course will provide an examination and analysis of views on the phenomena of organized crime and efforts to control it. Attention will be paid to criminal organizations in the United States, their beginnings in other cultural and ethnic backgrounds and their relations with criminal organizations around the world. In today’s world, criminal organizations in other countries and their activities have a major impact on crime in the United States. Therefore, a comparative approach to the subject must be used.
    (Same as P S 5680 .) [Dual-listed with C J 4680.]
  •  

    C J 5805 - Directed Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Directed research on a topic selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Student is expected to write a major research paper on this topic. May not be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite: C J 5000 /P S 5000.
  •  

    C J 5900 - Internship in Criminal Justice (3-12)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Field work in a criminal justice agency, office or institution and involvement in problem solving in these agencies and offices.
  •  

    C J 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  •  

    C J 5998 - Thesis Preparation (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    The purpose of this course is to offer the student who chooses to write a thesis the opportunity to initiate a literature search, review research strategies, develop hypotheses for testing, and prepare a thesis proposal for review by the thesis committee.
    (CJ 5998 is a prerequisite to C J 5999 .)
  •  

    C J 5999 - Thesis (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisite: C J 5998 .

Political Science

  •  

    P S 5001 - Scope and Methods (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to introduce students to both qualitative and quantitative research design and methods in political science. Topics will include approaches to political science, constructing research questions, literature reviews, critical reviews, hypothesis development and testing, survey design, experiments, case studies, and some introductory statistics. The course will also introduce students to the various fields in political science.
  •  

    P S 5002 - Research Methods and Statistics (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to introduce students to the nature, language, and statistical methods used by social scientists to conduct research in the field of political science. The course will stress both theory and application, and it will examine not only how data is gathered and analyzed by political scientists to explain human behavior, but also each step of the research process. Students will be exposed to sampling, survey research and a variety of other methods of obtaining and analyzing data. In the lab component of this course, students will have the opportunity to learn how to use computer software (mainly SPSS for Windows) to organize and analyze data and how to interpret and present the results of statistical analysis.
  •  

    P S 5010 - Seminar in Political Philosophy (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The seminar will provide an overview and critique of the literature in the field of political philosophy from the Enlightenment to the present.
  •  

    P S 5020 - Pro-Seminar in International Relations (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    The seminar will provide an overview and critique of the literature in the field on international relations.
  •  

    P S 5030 - Seminar in American Government and Politics (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Special investigation of selected topics in American government and politics. Topics will vary from year to year. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total of six credit hours.
  •  

    P S 5040 - Pro-Seminar in Comparative Politics (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    The seminar will provide an overview and critique of the literature in the field of comparative politics.
  •  

    P S 5050 - Seminar in Public Law and Judicial Behavior (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An examination of the multiple roles of law and the judicial system in the formulation and execution of public policy, to include the role of the judiciary in politics and government with emphasis on variables affecting judicial decision making.
    (Same as CJ 5050.)
  •  

    P S 5070 - Seminar in Media and Politics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of the large role played by the media in American and international politics. An examination of the large role played by the media in elections, state and local government, the judicial branch, Congress, the presidency, international affairs, and the individual political socialization process.
  •  

    P S 5100 - Seminar in Congressional Politics (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    Designed as an introduction to the major research on the U.S. Congress, students will critically examine theories of representation, congressional decision-making, the role of various institutional structures, and inter-branch relations. Topics will vary from year to year. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total of six credit hours.
  •  

    P S 5110 - Campaigns and Elections (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An examination of the theoretical approaches used to study American campaigns and elections. The course will examine research on public opinion, voting behavior, campaign strategies, turnout, and electoral outcomes at the local, state and national levels of government.
  •  

    P S 5120 - Readings and Research in International Relations (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course explores the problems and issues confronting international politics, new theoretical perspectives, and trends in the field of international relations. Topics may vary from semester to semester.
  •  

    P S 5125 - Readings and Research in Comparative Politics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course explores the problems and issues in various political systems, new theoretical perspectives of studying politics, and trends in the field of comparative politics. Topics may vary from semester to semester.
  •  

    P S 5130 - Appalachian Political Perspectives (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate odd-numbered years
    An examination of the political process in the Appalachian region. The fundamental political problems, the interrelationships of Appalachia and its people with the larger American political system, political culture, and economy.
  •  

    P S 5135 - Readings and Research in American Politics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines research and contemporary issues regarding the American electoral process and the key institutions of American National Government. Topics will vary from year to year. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total of six credit hours.
  •  

    P S 5145 - American Political Parties and Interest Groups (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An examination of the history, formation, and maintenance of American political parties and interest groups. Existing literature and the theoretical importance of these intermediaries in the political process will be evaluated. The roles of parties and interest groups as organizations, the roles they play in electoral politics, how they mobilize voters, and their roles in government will be examined.
  •  

    P S 5150 - Seminar in Public Policy (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Alternate Years
    An examination of the theories associated with the policy process including problem identification, agenda setting, decision-making, formulation, legitimation, implementation, and evaluation. The course will focus on policy change and it will also focus on substantive policy areas such as environmental and social policy.
  •  

    P S 5155 - Seminar in Political Behavior (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will examine numerous topics in political behavior, such as individual and mass participation, belief systems, public opinion, civic engagement, party identification, political psychology, tolerance, political socialization, and voting and elections. The course will also assess the means by which scholars have evaluated questions on the nature of political behavior and the conclusions they have drawn.
  •  

    P S 5170 - Advanced Political Psychology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will explore how cognitive and social psychology can be applied to the behavior of individuals and groups in American politics. To this end, it will cover theories of attitude change, information processing, ideology, emotions, intergroup relations, authoritarianism, and identity. The goal of the course is to encourage students to think critically about the material and gain an appreciation for interdisciplinary research.
  •  

    P S 5330 - Problems in State and Local Government (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Research on selected topics in American state and local government. The topics may vary from year to year.
  •  

    P S 5400 - Washington at Work (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to combine an academic perspective of the actors and institutions in our nation’s capitol with a hands-on exploration of Washington, D.C. and it will include both classroom teaching and a week in Washington, D.C. Requirements for the course will include classroom instruction, required readings, quizzes, and a research paper
  •  

    P S 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    P S 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    P S 5640 - Studies in Regional Political Patterns (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of selected regions of the world which have common historical and cultural patterns influencing their political styles and capabilities. Topics may vary from semester to semester.
    [Dual-listed with P S 4640.]
  •  

    P S 5661 - Court Administration (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to familiarize students with the need for, and approaches to, more effective management of federal and state courts. Topics include court reform, court unification, caseload management, alternative dispute resolution, personnel management and training, and audio-visual applications in the courts, among others.
    (Same as C J 5661 .) [Dual-listed with P S 4661.]
  •  

    P S 5670 - Advanced Environmental Politics (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course examines the role that politics and government play in dealing with environmental issues. Its focus is primarily on the U.S. approach to environmental protection, but some attention will be devoted to international environmental relationships such as the Kyoto Protocol. The course will cover the history of environmental policy, the legal and institutional arrangements for environmental protection, major environmental controversies and global environmental concerns.
  •  

    P S 5675 - Readings and Research in Environmental Policy (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines research and contemporary issues within environmental policy. Special topics include, but are not limited to: international environmental policy, environment and development, environmental justice, climate politics, resource governance, and others. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total of six credit hours.
  •  

    P S 5680 - Organized Crime (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    This course will provide an examination and analysis of views on the phenomena of organized crime and efforts to control it. Attention will be paid to criminal organizations in the United States, their beginnings in other cultural and ethnic backgrounds and their relations with criminal organizations around the world. In today’s world, criminal organizations in other countries and their activities have a major impact on crime in the United States. Therefore, a comparative approach to the subject must be used.
    (Same as C J 5680 ). [Dual-listed with PS 4680.]
  •  

    P S 5710 - American Political Thought (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A survey of the diverse political ideas represented in the American state from the colonial period to the present. Special emphasis is given to the political problems that emerge with the process of industrialization and the movement into a postindustrial economy.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4710.]
  •  

    P S 5721 - Human Rights (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course surveys the major literature in the field of international human rights. It investigates the questions of ethics, morality and the practice of human rights globally and attempts to address why the issue of international human rights has come to the fore in international politics.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4721.]
  •  

    P S 5722 - U.S. Foreign Policy (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    Investigates U.S. foreign policy from differing perspectives, focusing in on the historical record and contemporary issues.
  •  

    P S 5723 - International Political Economy (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of the relationship between political and economic activity, the way actors use one to manipulate the other, and the normative choices involved in doing so.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4723.]
  •  

    P S 5741 - European Governments and Politics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides an overview of the political development of Europe since World War II. We will compare the enduring features of West European politics, such as parliamentary democracy and the welfare state, with the dramatic changes in Eastern Europe, from the Communist seizure of power to the collapse of Communism. We will also explore the common challenges facing Europe today, such as regional integration and the rise of nationalism.
    [Dual-listed with P S 4741.]
  •  

    P S 5742 - Politics of Developing Nations (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    Focuses on the efforts of a majority of the world’s governments to meet the twin challenges of participatory politics and of the Global market economy.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4742.]
  •  

    P S 5743 - The European Union (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The emergence of the European Union is one of the major events in European history. The course explores the genesis and evolution of the idea of European integration and chronicles its organizational development in the post WWII era. Emphasis is placed on the politics of integration and the emergence of the Union as a major participant in world events.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4743.]
  •  

    P S 5744 - Middle East Politics (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An examination of the political, cultural, economic and social patterns of the Middle East.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4744.]
  •  

    P S 5745 - African Politics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course begins with the historical context of African politics. Then, it explores the problems of governance following independence and discusses the contemporary debate between two contending schools of thought in African politics and development: Afro-optimism and Afro-pessimism. It examines Africa’s relations with developing and developed countries as well.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4745.]
  •  

    P S 5748 - Latin American Politics (3)


    When Offered: Spring, Alternate years
    Examines Latin American politics in detail covering historical context, political actors, and current issues in Latin America.
    [Dual-listed with PS 4748.]
  •  

    P S 5800 - Directed Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Directed research on a topic selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Student is expected to write a major research paper on this topic. May not be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite: P S 5002  or C J 5000 .
  •  

    P S 5900 - Internship in Public Affairs (3-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Field work in government, community, professional offices and agencies and involvement in problem solving in these offices and agencies.
  •  

    P S 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  •  

    P S 5998 - Thesis Preparation (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    The purpose of this course is to offer the student who chooses to write a thesis the opportunity to initiate a literature search, review research strategies, develop hypotheses for testing, and prepare a thesis proposal for review by the thesis committee. Graded on an S/U basis. (P S 5998 is a prerequisite to P S 5999 .)
  •  

    P S 5999 - Thesis (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.
    Prerequisite: P S 5998 .

Public Administration

  •  

    P A 5000 - Research Methods (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The goal of this course is the development of the analytical abilities that will be needed by the student as a practicing public administrator. The foundations of inquiry, the various approaches to the study of social phenomena, and several analytical techniques are presented, discussed, and practiced.
    Prerequisite: an undergraduate statistics course.
  •  

    P A 5010 - Field-Based Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Intensive research is conducted under faculty supervision on a topic related to the student’s current or prospective employment and/or professional experience.
  •  

    P A 5060 - Seminar in Public Administration (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    History and development of the field of public administration with focus on the role of the administrator in the political process. Analysis of public agencies in a political context. Consideration of contemporary issues related to the field such as administrative ethics, decision making, and strategic planning.
  •  

    P A 5140 - Emergency Management Systems (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    This course covers the roles and responsibilities of local, state and federal government agencies in times of disaster. Four key actions (planning, response, recovery and mitigation) are highlighted in understanding the changing role of government vis-à-vis individuals and businesses in minimizing loss of life and property due to natural, technological and terrorist actions. This course focuses on preparedness planning issues, intergovernmental relations, financial support for affected communities, and the changing requirements for professional development in Emergency Management in the 21st Century.
  •  

    P A 5160 - Topics in Public Administration (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An examination of selected problems in public administration with emphasis on analytical case studies.
  •  

    P A 5180 - Public Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An examination of the major forces that influence the formation, implementation and administration of public policy and methodological approaches to assess the impact of public policies.
    Prerequisite: P A 5000  
    (Same as C J 5180 .)
  •  

    P A 5260 - Organization Theory and Behavior (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An examination of the basic theoretical approaches and issues in organizations and organizational behavior and the dynamics of human interactions within public bureaucracies.
  •  

    P A 5270 - Not-for-Profit Organizations (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An overview of the voluntary sector with emphasis on the administration and management of not-for-profit organizations. Areas of study will include theories on the development of not-for-profit organizations, government-nonprofit relationships, and advocacy efforts. Techniques of nonprofit management will include emphasis on ethics, board/volunteer recruitment, and marketing as well as grants and other funding sources.
  •  

    P A 5271 - Grants Strategies and Preparation (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    Overview of the grants arena in the U.S., with emphasis on the techniques of proposal preparation. Topics include the history of the grants system, types of grants, sources of funding, application process, and contract administration. Practical exercises in identifying funding opportunities, preparing elements of a grant application, and scoring completed proposals are incorporated.
  •  

    P A 5360 - Public Personnel Administration (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Overview of public personnel practices with a focus on methods of employee recruitment selection, evaluation, and related aspects. Analysis of issue areas such as fair employment practices, affirmative action, and comparable worth.
  •  

    P A 5460 - Budgeting and Fiscal Administration (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The politics of budgeting, budgetary process, and fiscal administration in public and non-profit agencies.
  •  

    P A 5461 - Public Financial Management (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The principles and practices concerning the efficient and prudent management of the funds / finances of the government.
  •  

    P A 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    P A 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    P A 5558 - Capstone Research (1)


    When Offered: Spring
    Capstone Research is a course which involves the completion of a significant research paper under the direction of a major professor selected by the student from among the Master of Public Administration faculty.
    Corequisite: P A 5559 .
  •  

    P A 5559 - Capstone in Public Administration (2)


    When Offered: Spring
    This seminar integrates the theoretical and practical perspectives of public administration as a discipline. The capstone course involves students in management problem-solving as well as the following activities: development of executive skills; refinement of presentation skills; discussions of likely ethical situations; and securing public sector employment.
    Corequisite: P A 5558 
  •  

    P A 5560 - Local Government Administration (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Administrative process, management, personnel, budget and finance, and intergovernmental relations in local government.
    Prerequisite: approval by the instructor
    [Dual-listed with PA 4560.]
  •  

    P A 5665 - Public Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the organization and operation of government agencies and their role in policy making and implementation and an examination of the various concepts and theories pertaining to administrative behavior and to the performance of the basic tasks of management.
  •  

    P A 5800 - Directed Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Directed research on a topic selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Student is expected to write a major research paper on this topic. May not be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite: P A 5000 .
  •  

    P A 5900 - Internship in Public Administration (3-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Field work in government, community, professional offices, and agencies; and involvement in problem solving in these offices and agencies.
  •  

    P A 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. PA 5989 does not count toward a degree.

Department of History

history.appstate.edu

James Goff, Chair
goffjr@appstate.edu

Judkin Browning, Graduate Program Director
browningjj@appstate.edu

Programs

Master of Arts

Graduate Minor

Courses

History

  •  

    HIS 5000 - Varieties and Methodologies of History (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An introduction to the study of history at the graduate level, with attention to the history of the discipline, important theoretical and methodological debates in the field, and examination of methods of research practiced in historical sub-disciplines. Required of all History graduate students in their first year of study.
  •  

    HIS 5002 - Seminar in Public History (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course provides an introduction to and consideration of the major methodological and theoretical approaches to the primary sectors of Public History, including archives and records management, historical interpretation and preservation, historical editing and publishing.
  •  

    HIS 5106 - Readings Seminar in European History (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Course will emphasize significant fields of historical study in the area of European history. Strong emphasis will be placed on current scholarship and bibliography.
  •  

    HIS 5107 - Research Seminar in European History (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Seminars will give students practical experience in examination and interpretation of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on defining the topic to be researched, assessing its significance within the field of European history, and methodological problems and issues.
  •  

    HIS 5206 - Readings Seminar in American History (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Course will emphasize significant fields of historical study in the area of American history. Strong emphasis will be placed on current scholarship and bibliography.
  •  

    HIS 5207 - Research Seminar in American History (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Seminars will give students practical experience in examination and interpretation of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on defining the topic to be researched, assessing its significance within the field of American history, and methodological problems and issues.
  •  

    HIS 5208 - Readings Seminar in Appalachian History (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Course will emphasize significant fields of historical study in the area of Appalachian history. Strong emphasis will be placed on current scholarship and bibliography.
  •  

    HIS 5209 - Research Seminar in Appalachian History (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Seminars will give students practical experience in examination and interpretation of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on defining the topic to be researched, assessing its significance within the field of Appalachian history, and methodological problems and issues.
  •  

    HIS 5306 - Readings Seminar in Latin American History (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Course will emphasize significant fields of historical study in the area of Latin American history. Strong emphasis will be placed on current scholarship and bibliography.
  •  

    HIS 5307 - Research Seminar in Latin American History (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Seminars will give students practical experience in examination and interpretation of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on defining the topic to be researched, assessing its significance within the field of Latin American history, and methodological problems and issues.
  •  

    HIS 5400 - Grant Writing (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Even-numbered years
    This is a course tailored for advanced humanities and social science students who would find grant development skills useful for their careers–as well as to enhance their C.V.s. The course introduces various categories of external funding (e.g., grants, fellowships, contracts) and funders (e.g., public, nonprofit, private) and the advantages and disadvantages of these categories of funding. It introduces search strategies and the option of combining several funding sources to support projects. It deals with communication with program officers, emphasizes writing to program guidelines and for reviewers, and introduces the basics of budget development. The main assessed work for the course is a grant proposal, written to mock or real guidelines, requesting support for a research, programming, or service project.
  •  

    HIS 5406 - Readings Seminar in African/Middle Eastern/Asian History (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Course will emphasize significant fields of historical study in the areas of African, Middle Eastern, or Asian history. Strong emphasis will be placed on current scholarship and bibliography.
  •  

    HIS 5407 - Research Seminar in African/Middle Eastern/Asian History (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Seminars will give students practical experience in examination and interpretation of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on defining the topic to be researched, assessing its significance within the fields of African, Middle Eastern, or Asian history, and methodological problems and issues.
  •  

    HIS 5450 - History and Social Studies Education (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    HIS 5450 is the capstone course for the Master of Arts degree in History, Education with a concentration in Secondary School Teaching. Participants complete the Product of Learning requirement, which is presented to a board of university and public school professionals. Assignments include the examination of research on instruction in history and social studies, the development of an action research project to be implemented in a classroom setting, and the performance of evaluative reflection on the program as a whole.
  •  

    HIS 5460 - World History: Concepts and Content (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Reading seminar is designed to introduce students to the important theories, themes, concepts and methods in the field of world history.
  •  

    HIS 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    HIS 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    HIS 5575 - Introduction to Public History (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course explores major fields and contemporary issues within public history, such as oral history, museum interpretation, historic preservation and sustainable development, new media, material culture, and controversy in public history. The course will also investigate the contested relationship between the practice of public history and changing ideas about historical memory, identity, power, and ethics. Through readings and papers, occasional field trips and/or guest speakers, and/or team projects, graduate students will build upon their prior experience with public history, with an eye towards preparing for the job market.
  •  

    HIS 5576 - Cultural Resource Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Cultural Resource Management (CRM) is integral to the fields of historic preservation, cultural site management, and public history. Areas of study include environmental review law, CRM business practices, and the management, preservation, and conservation of cultural resources, including historical and archaeological sites. Effective stewardship of culturally significant properties is a major focus of this course. A grounding in current CRM practices is provided including laws and procedures enacted to protect and preserve these resources. Effective methods of site management, facilities operations/funding and CRM project management are covered.
  •  

    HIS 5577 - Historical Documentation (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Even-numbered years
    Historical documentation teaches the formal recording of the history and physical characteristics of historic sites, structures and buildings required for preservation, planning and environmental mitigation. Skills utilized by public historians and cultural resources specialists, including local history research, historical context, photographic documentation, mapping and spatial analysis techniques are included. Students will use a range of these skills in completing a service project.
  •  

    HIS 5578 - Architectural History (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Odd-numbered years
    A foundation in architectural history is an essential component of public history and cultural resource management education. The course will cover the evolution of architecture from early indigenous habitats and early American vernacular buildings to modern architectural styles. This is useful course for managers, interpreters, and documenters of historic and historic archaeological sites. The course will include a preservation project.
  •  

    HIS 5579 - Oral History (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    A survey of the history, philosophy and techniques of recovering and developing primary historical source materials by means of carefully interviewing, recording and converting the memories of selected individuals into history. The course focus is primarily on U.S. history but can include topics and issues from other countries. The class format is discussion with some lectures and documentary films. The course will teach skills such as interview transcriptions from audio-tape, background research, and oral history interviews.
  •  

    HIS 5580 - Studies in Material Culture (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Even-numbered years
    This course provides a broad introduction to the multidisciplinary field of material culture studies. The course introduces ways of looking at and learning from objects and examines how practitioners from a variety of disciplines have approached the study of material culture.
  •  

    HIS 5581 - Records and Society (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The history of archival management and its evolution into the digital age is essential to the understanding and use of archival systems. Types of archives and records encountered by historians in the course of their research will be discussed. The evolution of the methodology behind the development of archival collections will be included. Different media utilized from ancient times to the present will be examined in light of the preservation and collection problems they present for the archivist or researcher. This course is designed to provide a fuller understanding of the history and evolution of historical archives and collections.
  •  

    HIS 5583 - American Environmental History (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An overview of Americans’ interaction with the natural world from colonization to the present. Emphasis on: Native Americans’ relationship to the land; the environmental effects of European settlement; the growth of agriculture and industry; conservation and preservation; atomic energy; chemical pesticides, and the modern environmental movement. The course is of particular interest to public historians, cultural resource managers, planners and environmental specialists.
  •  

    HIS 5584 - America’s National Parks (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A survey of the history of America’s national parks from the nineteenth century to the present. Emphasis on: Americans’ changing ideas about wilderness preservation, the early history of Yosemite and Yellowstone, the role of railroads in park promotion, removal of Native Americans and white settlers from park sites, establishment of the National Park Service, the impact of the automobile on tourism, the creation of national parks in the eastern U.S., wildlife policy, overcrowding and other problems facing the parks.
  •  

    HIS 5586 - Introduction to Historic Preservation (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Even-numbered years
    Historic preservation is the identification, protection, and enhancement of historic resources. This course covers the history of preservation in the United States. In particular, students will study the evolution of the federal preservation programs along with the methodology and requirements of the National Register of Historic Places. The course introduces current programs and techniques utilized for the preservation of historic buildings, landscapes, and sites. Students will learn about governmental, non-profit, and for-profit organizations involved in historic preservation and their importance in determining the direction of the field. The course includes a practical component.
  •  

    HIS 5587 - Philosophy of Historic Preservation (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    A graduate course on historic preservation in which the class will explore different approaches to preservation. We will consider aspects of the history, philosophy, and practice of preservation in order to contribute to professional development. We will look in- depth at contemporary themes in preservation. These may include adaptive reuse, heritage tourism, cultural landscapes, and/or new directions in the field. Students will complete an appropriate project.
  •  

    HIS 5591 - Archives, History, and Collective Memory (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Odd-numbered years
    This course will examine the relationship between history and archives with a focus on the impact these disciplines have on the construction of collective memory. Students in this course will consider such historical and archival issues as the process of memory construction, public history display, commemoration, the writing of history, and the formulation of political and national identities through the lens of the archival record. The class will consider the use or misuse of archives to shape political or social myths and the use of documents to influence a shared historical consciousness.
  •  

    HIS 5595 - Digital History (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Even-numbered years
    This course prepares students to use and understand a wide variety of current and emerging digital technologies in the service of doing history. In addition to learning about these technologies, students will also consider their usefulness, the differences in input and output technologies for historians, and what constitutes digital history. Students will complete one or more digital projects.
  •  

    HIS 5610 - Management of Museums (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Odd-numbered years
    This course surveys the history of museum development internationally, and components of modern museum operation. Major topics include the world history of museums, the development of core management documents, and finance.
  •  

    HIS 5640 - Interpretation in Museums (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    This course surveys the manner by which museums create and present exhibits and other programs intended for the public. Topics include the philosophy of exhibits, methods of exhibit design, model making, label writing, development of non-exhibit programming and evaluation.
  •  

    HIS 5650 - Museum Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Even-numbered years
    An examination of how teaching in museums is achieved through interpretive and education programs. Students will study a variety of museum environments and teaching strategies by engaging in case studies, class discussion, student presentations and field trips. The course will introduce and prepare history, cultural resource management, public history, and education students for the growing field of museum education. Topics covered include museum orientation and interpretation, museum promotion, grant-writing, educational psychology, media and technology and educational outreach.
  •  

    HIS 5660 - Topics in Public and Applied History (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Variable content. A systematic examination of a field in public and applied history such as collections management, living history, or architecture and society. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course.
  •  

    HIS 5900 - Internship in History (3-12)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Placement in a supervised teaching environment, or other supervised work experience appropriate for history students with instruction and practice of that knowledge in a work environment. Students may be required to reside off campus for the duration of the internship.
  •  

    HIS 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  •  

    HIS 5998 - Thesis Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Students carry out principal research for a thesis topic, meet regularly with a thesis advisor, and revise and defend the thesis prospectus. First half of a two-semester thesis requirement; students must also complete HIS 5999 .
  •  

    HIS 5999 - Thesis (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Students participate in monthly meetings of a research colloquium involving all students completing theses. In the meetings, students present their research in successive stages and receive critiques of their written work. Second half of a two-semester thesis requirement; students must first complete HIS 5998 .

Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

dllc.appstate.edu

James Fogelquist, Chair
fogelquistjd@appstate.edu

Beverly Moser, Graduate Program Director
moserba@appstate.edu

The Romance Languages degree programs provide graduate course work targeted toward the following professional populations:

  • Certificate: students holding a baccalaureate degree in the language or a closely related field and a master’s degree who seek the credentials needed for teaching college-level French or Spanish.
  • MA (K-12 Teaching): teachers who hold or are eligible to hold the NC “A” certification and seek Master (M) Level Licensure, pursue continued state certification, and prepare to seek national board certification.
  • MA (College Teaching): students holding a baccalaureate degree in the language or a closely related field who are preparing for teaching and/or to work with international populations at the college level.
  • The programs strive to strengthen existing language skills through continued development of target language proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, to enhance students’ knowledge of the target culture, to develop a functional research capability and teaching skills, and to support practical experiences in using and teaching the target language.

Students entering the programs must:

  • provide a writing sample in the target language (an original essay, personal statement, academic paper, undergraduate portfolio);
  • prepare, under the supervision of a language professor on campus or elsewhere, an audiocassette where they respond orally in the target language to a series of questions;
  • demonstrate credit for at least two literature courses and two culture courses taken at the undergraduate level.

Dual Certification (K-12) in French and Spanish: With approval from the departmental chair, teachers seeking dual certification in French and Spanish may develop a program of study containing 18 semester hours of course work in French and 18 semester hours in Spanish.

Students with Undergraduate Deficiencies: Graduate students who do not have adequate undergraduate credits may begin graduate study, IF, at the same time, they are completing the required undergraduate hours to fulfill the prerequisites and/or distribution regarding coursework in literature and culture. Students whose language proficiency is inadequate may be required to take appropriate courses prior to being recommended for Admission to Candidacy.

Study Abroad: Candidates for the MA are strongly encouraged to arrange a study abroad program of at least six weeks’ duration during the course of their studies. Students participating in established graduate-level programs abroad are encouraged to discuss course transfer requirements in advance with the advisor and the program director.

Programs

Master of Arts

Graduate Certificate

Graduate Minor

Courses

French

  •  

    FRE 5000 - Research and Critical Theory (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Overview of source materials and advanced research methodologies in languages. Study of the various critical movements and disciplinary approaches to language and literature. Practical application of methods for uncovering, evaluating, organizing, and reporting of source material.
    (Same as SNH 5000 .)
  •  

    FRE 5001 - Francophone Children’s and Adolescent Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course will investigate the history and development of children’s and adolescent literature in France and in the francophone world. Study of roles and perceptions of the child and adolescent as these appear in fictional and (auto)biographical writings, and various mass media. Readings may vary.
  •  

    FRE 5002 - Masterpieces of Francophone Art and Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of French and Francophone plastic, performance, and verbal art from various historical periods and geographic origins. The course offers a pluridisciplinary exploration of relationships between artistic works and the cultures that produce them. Readings may vary. Barring duplication of content, the course may be repeated for a total credit of six semester hours.
  •  

    FRE 5003 - French Women Writers (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An examination of French women writers and their works from the Middle Ages to the present. The survey will consider examples of many genres women have created, used, or adapted. Primary sources chosen for important themes will be complemented by historical and critical readings. Selection of authors and works will vary from semester to semester.
  •  

    FRE 5004 - The French Media (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The course explores the historical evolution, vehicles of diffusion, purposes, and importance of French media from traditional print to innovative hypertext, and from rudimentary radio to digital broadcasting of the “information age.” Coursework includes theoretical readings that complement a “hands-on” investigation and manipulation of these various media.
  •  

    FRE 5021 - Poetry of French Expression (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Comprehensive overview of poetic form, function, and analysis as these pertain to the French- speaking world and French and Francophone literary history. Commented readings of representative poetic texts as products of culture and as tools for language learning.
  •  

    FRE 5023 - Theater and Performance in French (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Study of a variety of aspects pertaining to theatricality and theatrical genres from traditional venues to pop culture icons. Primary texts will be complemented by theoretical works, film adaptations, and other media presentations. Readings may vary.
  •  

    FRE 5025 - French Cultural Studies (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of various artifacts, historic events, and cultural practices and theories that have shaped the private and public spheres of social and institutional development in France. Readings may vary.
  •  

    FRE 5026 - Francophone Cultures (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course consists of an in-depth study of selected literary texts and other cultural artifacts (such as films, newspapers, magazines) that underline the traditional and contemporary aspects of Francophone culture. Laboratory work will be mandatory.
  •  

    FRE 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    FRE 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    FRE 5555 - History of the French Language (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Study of the evolution of French from Latin to its present form; internal developments and external influences. Study of phonology, morphology and syntax of Old French and reading of selected Old French texts.
  •  

    FRE 5565 - Advanced French Expression (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Students will have the opportunity to advance their oral and written proficiencies by examining and using different registers of contemporary spoken French as well as analyzing different written genres. Their oral work will be based on reading and discussing current articles from newspapers and periodicals; their written work will be modeled on selected literary and cultural narratives written by experienced French writers.
    Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing and FRE 3080 (Advanced Grammar and Composition), or consent of the instructor.
    [Dual- listed with FRE 4565.]
  •  

    FRE 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. FRE 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  •  

    FRE 5999 - Thesis (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.

Languages, Literatures, & Cultures

  •  

    LLC 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    LLC 5525 - Product of Learning (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An on-going research/pedagogical project in thesis or portfolio form.
  •  

    LLC 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    LLC 5550 - Structure of Modern English for TESL (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will investigate the structure of the English language from the viewpoint of modern linguistics. Focus will be placed on the role of grammar in the second language classroom and methods of teaching grammar in a communicative context.
    Prerequisites: two years of a language other than English and LLC 2050 (Say What? Language in Mind and Society) or ENG 3610 (Studies in the Principles of Language).
    [Dual-listed with LLC 4550.]
  •  

    LLC 5551 - Materials and Methods in TESL (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A survey of various methods and materials to teach English to speakers of other languages. Discussion will focus on factors affecting how curricula are developed to most effectively teach speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture to ESL students. Central to this course will be: an emphasis on various methods used to teach ESL holistically and in the context of a particular content; assessment; materials and resources; and the growth and development of the field of ESL.
    Prerequisites: two years of a language other than English and LLC 2050 (Say What? Language in Mind and Society) or ENG 3610 (Studies in the Principles of Language).
    [Dual-listed with LLC 4551.]
  •  

    LLC 5555 - Practicum in TESL (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides future ESL teachers with experience teaching English to speakers of other languages in a supervised setting. As a part of this course, students complete a project/portfolio for use in future instruction.
    Prerequisites: two years of a language other than English and LLC 2050 (Say What? Language in Mind and Society) or ENG 3610 (Studies in the Principles of Language), LLC 3010 (Second Language Acquisition), LLC 3020 (Language, Society and the Teaching of ESL), and LLC 5550 . May be taken concurrently with LLC 5551 .
    [Dual-listed with LLC 4555.]
  •  

    LLC 5590 - Issues in Teaching Languages and Cultures (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An examination of current methodologies for teaching and research in second language learning across varied instructional settings, with practical applications that reflect an evolving standard of professionalism for language teachers. A textbook along with recent publications on the National Standards for Language Teaching are the core readings for the course, with additional articles placed on reserve in the Library. Offered alternate years with LLC 5601 .
  •  

    LLC 5600 - Linguistics (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    Study of sounds/intonation, word formation, syntax, semantics, pragmatics and their application to learning a second language. Different theoretical approaches will be explained. Students will apply linguistic concepts to problems in a variety of languages. The course will also demonstrate how linguistics analyzes dialects and resolves problems of language learning and teaching.
  •  

    LLC 5601 - Bilingualism and Second Language Acquisition (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An examination of competing views of second language acquisition which inform the way languages are taught. Introduction to a variety of research methods and practices typically used to study and assess student learning. The course culminates in the design of a second-language acquisition project by the student. Offered alternate years with LLC 5590 .
  •  

    LLC 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.

Spanish

  •  

    SNH 5000 - Research and Critical Theory (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Overview of source materials and advanced research methodologies in languages. Study of the various critical movements and disciplinary approaches to language and literature. Practical application of methods for uncovering, evaluating, organizing, and reporting of source material.
    (Same as FRE 5000 .)
  •  

    SNH 5001 - Hispanic Children’s and Adolescent Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Critical readings of literary works in different genres written for children and adolescents. Study of the evolution and theory of children’s and adolescent literature in Latin America and Spain. Special focus on the cultural background, cross-cultural ties, and pedagogy of children’s and adolescent literature.
    [Dual-listed with SNH 4001.]
  •  

    SNH 5002 - Masterpieces of Hispanic Art and Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Study of seminal works in Spanish and Latin American art and literature, and their literary and cultural impact. Cross-disciplinary approach, taking into account the social, cultural, political, and historical context and impact of texts and objects. Barring duplication of content, the course may be repeated once.
  •  

    SNH 5003 - Hispanic Short Fiction (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the short story in Hispanic literature, which will examine the genre from a cultural and literary perspective. Readings and commentary of selected short stories, especially by women and ethnic authors, will trace the history of the genre and explore its main themes. Primary sources will be complemented by literary historical and critical readings.
    [Dual-listed with SNH 4003.]
  •  

    SNH 5005 - The 20th Century Hispanic Novel (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of the most representative texts of the 20th century Hispanic novel in relation to the respective literary and cultural movements of the time in which the novels were written. The study of primary texts will be complemented by theoretical and critical readings.
    [Dual-listed with SNH 4005.]
  •  

    SNH 5023 - Poetry in Spain and Latin America (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of Hispanic poetry, which will examine the formal and thematic characteristics of the genre through some of the most meaningful texts by Spanish and Latin American poets. The course includes readings and commentaries of poems as vehicles of cultural diversity and self- expression. Special focus is on the pedagogical potential of poetry in the second language learning process.
  •  

    SNH 5024 - Theater and Performance in the Hispanic World (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The course offers an examination of Latin American and Spanish plays and performances from an interdisciplinary perspective, and within the context of Hispanic culture and history. Students will study Hispanic plays and performances as texts, spectacles, and learning tools.
  •  

    SNH 5026 - Hispanic Cultural Studies (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Reading and analysis of articles, books, comics, movies and songs which enable understanding of historical and current cultural issues. The course offers a critical analysis of common definitions and concepts of Hispanic culture, and will provide the opportunity to gain new perspectives relative to literary and cultural artifacts.
  •  

    SNH 5027 - The Media in Latin America and Spain (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Study of newspapers, magazines, music, TV programs, and films as products and producers of culture in Spain and Latin America. The course will provide students with the opportunity to acquaint themselves with theoretical approaches to media, and will allow them to develop practical applications of various media in the instructional process.
  •  

    SNH 5028 - Seminar in Spanish Linguistics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Study and analysis of the Spanish language from a linguistic perspective. The seminar format allows the study of various topics within Spanish linguistics. These may include the study of Spanish in its social and political contexts, Spanish phonetics and phonology, Spanish syntax and morphology, and language variation in the Spanish-speaking world. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total of six credit hours.
  •  

    SNH 5030 - Latin American Thought Through Literature and Film (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Reading and critical analysis of the works of Latin American essayists, novelists, poets and film makers who have shaped, transformed, mapped, and contributed to the evolution of Latin American thought from the nineteenth century through the present.
  •  

    SNH 5035 - Language Variation in the Spanish-speaking World (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Study of regional and social variation in modern Spanish, both in Spain and Latin America, and of minority languages, language contact, and language policy in the Spanish-speaking world.
  •  

    SNH 5075 - Migration in Literature and Film (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course will be a study of the representation of contemporary migration and its cultural and social impact through meaningful productions in film, fiction, and poems. There will be readings and commentaries of film, fiction, and poetry as vehicles of cultural diversity and self-expression examined with a special focus on the pedagogical potential of these productions in the second language learning process.
  •  

    SNH 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    SNH 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    SNH 5555 - History of the Spanish Language (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Study of the evolution of the Spanish language, with particular emphasis on the history of standardized Spanish and the development of regional variations of spoken Spanish. The approach takes into account the social, cultural, and political factors that have contributed to linguistic change and have shaped the complex fabric of historical and contemporary varieties of Spanish.
    [Dual-listed with SNH 4555.]
  •  

    SNH 5565 - Advanced Spanish Expression (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An advanced language course where students will have the opportunity to perfect their mastery of the spoken and written language. Students will explore different writing genres and model their work on the literary and cultural narratives written by experienced Spanish writers, and will be provided with the necessary tools to develop their oral language skills.
    Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing and SNH 3080 (Advanced Grammar and Composition), or consent of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with SNH 4565.]
  •  

    SNH 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  •  

    SNH 5999 - Thesis (3)


    When Offered: On Demand

Department of Mathematical Sciences

mathgrad.mathsci.appstate.edu

Eric Marland, Chair
marlandes@appstate.edu

Ross Gosky, Graduate Program Co-Director
goskyrm@appstate.edu

Holly Hirst, Graduate Program Co-Director
hirsthp@appstate.edu

This program is designed for students who are interested in pursuing a rigorous graduate program in mathematics with the added benefit of gaining hands-on training and experience with teaching. It can qualify students for advanced teacher licensure in high school mathematics, prepare students for community college teaching positions, or serve as excellent preparation for doctoral programs in mathematics or mathematics education.

Students pursue one or both of two concentrations.

Concentration in College Teaching - Designed for students who are interested in teaching mathematics at the college level. The course of study follows the American Mathematical Association of Two Year Colleges (AMATYC) guidelines for faculty preparation, in addition to allowing students to complete a rigorous core of graduate level mathematics.

Concentration in Secondary Teaching - Designed for students who are interested in furthering their secondary school teaching credentials. The course of study follows the North Carolina guidelines for advanced (M) licensure in mathematics, as well as CAEP accreditation guidelines on the preparation of master’s level mathematics high school teachers.

Programs

Master of Arts

Courses

Mathematics

  •  

    MAT 5015 - Advanced Seminar in Secondary Mathematics Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course will include an examination of the North Carolina Mathematics Curriculum for high school with emphases on geometry and other selected topics. Class discussions, group activities, written assignments, and oral presentation will be integral parts of the course. A field experience and other professional development activities are required outside of class.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with MAT 4015.]
  •  

    MAT 5125 - History of Mathematics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The history and development of mathematical thought and theory from ancient to modern times, with particular attention to the history of geometry, algebra, calculus, differential equations, linear algebra, and statistics, and to the persons who made significant contributions to these areas of mathematics.
  •  

    MAT 5160 - Complex Variables (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An introduction to the study of complex variables to include such topics as line integrals, the Cauchy theorem, the Cauchy integral formula, Morera’s theorem, and the Laurent series.
  •  

    MAT 5210 - Abstract Algebra (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of intermediate group theory, including group actions and the Sylow theorems; and ring theory, including polynomial rings, factorizations in principal ideal domains, and modules.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3110 (Introduction to Modern Algebra) or permission of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with MAT 4720.]
  •  

    MAT 5220 - Abstract Algebra II (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of some advanced topics from abstract algebra, including splitting fields, finite fields, geometric constructions, and Galois theory.
    Prerequisite: MAT 5210  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    MAT 5230 - Linear Algebra (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of finite dimensional vector spaces. Among the topics covered are matrices, linear transformations, change of basis, eigenvalues, canonical forms, quadratic forms and quasi- inverses.
    Prerequisite: MAT 2240 (Linear Algebra) or MAT 3110 (Modern Algebra).
  •  

    MAT 5310 - Numerical Analysis with Computer Applications (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of methods of solving systems of linear and non-linear equations, differential equations and numerical integrations with emphasis on convergence properties and error analysis.
    Prerequisites: MAT 3220 (Introduction to Real Analysis I), and CS 1440 (Computer Science I).
    Corequisite: MAT 5610 . (Same as C S 5310 .)
  •  

    MAT 5330 - Mathematical Models (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A problems oriented course. The student uses mathematics to model a number of different situations. Among the tools used will be calculus, probability, statistics, linear algebra, differential equations, and computer simulation.
    Prerequisites: Background in at least three of the utilized tools.
  •  

    MAT 5340 - Introduction to Operations Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A thorough study of linear programming including duality theory and sensitivity analysis. At least two other topics related to mathematical applications in the management sciences queuing theory, Markov processes, game theory, decision analysis, network analysis, etc. will be covered.
    Prerequisites: MAT 2240 (Linear Algebra) and STT 3850 (Statistical Data Analysis).
    [Dual-listed with MAT 4340.]
  •  

    MAT 5390 - Numerical Linear Algebra (3)


    When Offered: Spring, On Demand
    Methods for solving systems of linear equations with an emphasis on large, sparse systems. LU factorization including storage schemes, graph theory, ordering algorithms, and block factorization. Iterative methods including Jacobi, SOR, and conjugate gradient. Eigenvalue methods including power method, QR factorization, and Lanczos methods. Parallel matrix computations.
    Prerequisite: MAT 4310 (Numerical Methods).
    [Dual-listed with MAT 4990.]
  •  

    MAT 5415 - Seminar in the Pedagogy of Mathematics (1)


    When Offered: Spring
    Topics from mathematical content, pedagogy, and epistemology are examined, such as current trends in mathematics education, alternative learning styles, teaching developmental and adult students, and teaching with technology. This course may be repeated once for a total credit of two semester hours.
  •  

    MAT 5420 - Teaching Apprenticeship (1)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course provides a supervised experience in teaching in the mathematical sciences through direct participation in a classroom situation. Each student will work closely with a university faculty mentor and will be actively engaged in instructional practices, such as the development of activities and assignments or other relevant experiences. This course may be repeated for a total credit of two semester hours.
  •  

    MAT 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisite: 12 hours of graduate mathematics.
  •  

    MAT 5520 - Capstone Project in Secondary Education (1-2)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A curriculum/action research project will be chosen, formulated, and implemented by the student under the guidance of a faculty member. This project should use knowledge gained in the secondary mathematics graduate program and apply it in the secondary classroom. A final written paper and presentation are required. MAT 5520 must be taken for a total credit of two semester hours.
    Prerequisite: MAT 5910 .
  •  

    MAT 5525 - Product of Learning (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    MAT 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    MAT 5590 - Advanced Topics in Differential Equations (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Development and application of advanced topics in differential equations. Topics may include foundational theories of differential equations, partial differential equations, perturbation theory, calculus of variations, distribution theory, transform theory, or other advanced topics.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3130 (Introduction to Differential Equations). Barring duplication of content, MAT 5590 may be repeated for a total credit of six semester hours.
    [Dual-listed with MAT 4590.]
  •  

    MAT 5600 - Directed Research in Mathematical Sciences (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A research project will be chosen, formulated, and executed by the student under the guidance of a faculty member. The project may investigate a mathematical sciences or a mathematics pedagogy topic. A final written report and presentation are required. MAT 5600 must be taken for a total credit of three semester hours.
  •  

    MAT 5610 - Analysis I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A rigorous treatment of the topology of the real numbers, continuity, differentiation, integration, and sequences and series of functions.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3220 (Introduction to Real Analysis I) or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    MAT 5620 - Analysis II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A continuation of MAT 5610 , including a rigorous development of differentiation and integration of functions of several variables, vector analysis, and Lebesgue theory.
    Prerequisite: MAT 5610  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    MAT 5710 - Introduction to Topology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of the basic concepts of general topological spaces including such topics as metric spaces, continuous functions, connectedness, product spaces, and compactness.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3220 (Introduction to Real Analysis I).
    [Dual-listed with MAT 4710.]
  •  

    MAT 5720 - Topology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of topology to include such topics as general product spaces, complete metric spaces, compactifications, embedding, metrization theorems, and quotient spaces.
    Prerequisite: MAT 5710 .
  •  

    MAT 5910 - Investigation in the Teaching of Mathematics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of recent research and experimental programs in the teaching of secondary school and undergraduate mathematics, with a focus on characteristics of research designs (including action research, curriculum development and analysis, teaching experiments, and case studies).
    Prerequisite: undergraduate mathematics major or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    MAT 5923 - Geometry & Spatial Visualization: K-5 Assessment (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Formative and summative assessment strategies of students’ geometric thinking in elementary grades; concept development of 2- and 3-dimensional geometry. Attention also given to diagnosis of student errors. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: C I 5922 
    (Same as C I 5923 .)
  •  

    MAT 5924 - Algebraic Reasoning: K-5 Discourse & Questioning (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Focus on the early algebra concepts of functional thinking and generalized arithmetic in relationship to pedagogical practices centered on questioning in the mathematics classroom. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: C I 5922 
    (Same as C I 5924 .)
  •  

    MAT 5925 - Data Analysis and Measurement: K-5 Classroom Interactions (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Focus on statistical literacy of elementary teachers and the teaching of data analysis and measurement to K-5 students; attention is also given to learning methods which facilitate appropriate classroom interactions. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: C I 5922 .
    (Same as C I 5925 .)
  •  

    MAT 5935 - Basic Concepts of Probability and Statistics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines the concepts underlying the elementary and middle school curriculum in probability and statistics. Probability models will be studied using both mathematical approaches and simulations. Statistics will be presented as a problem solving process involving question formulation, data collection, data analysis and the interpretation of results. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3910. Introduction to the Logic and Structure of Mathematics I or MAT 3920. Introduction to the Logic and Structure of Mathematics II or permission of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with MAT 4930.]
  •  

    MAT 5941 - Technology for Teaching Mathematics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The use of current computer and calculator technology in various mathematics content areas will be studied. Technology use in these areas will involve problem solving, exploring patterns, experimentation, conjecturing and generalization of findings. Appropriate use of technology will be stressed.
    Prerequisite: undergraduate major in mathematics, or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    MAT 5952 - Problem Solving (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Problem solving is the focus of this course. There is an emphasis on building new mathematical knowledge through work with problems and applying a wide variety of strategies to solve problems and adapt the strategies to new situations. Problems may be drawn from algebra, geometry, number theory, calculus, probability and statistics.
    Prerequisites: knowledge in all the areas from which the problems will be drawn.
  •  

    MAT 5961 - Foundations of Geometry (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    A treatment of projective geometry including both the synthetic and the analytic approach. Also to be considered is a study of the relation of Euclidean, affine and hyperbolic geometries to projective geometry.
    Prerequisites: MAT 2240 (Linear Algebra) and MAT 3610 (Geometry).
  •  

    MAT 5965 - Informal Geometry (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is an informal treatment of the geometric concepts in the elementary and middle school mathematics curriculum. The topics considered include polygons, congruence, similarity, tilings, transformations, symmetry, angles, constructions, area, perimeter, circles, and polyhedra. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3910. Introduction to the Logic and Structure of Mathematics I or MAT 3920. Introduction to the Logic and Structure of Mathematics II or permission of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with MAT 4910.]
  •  

    MAT 5970 - Number Theory Concepts (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    Designed primarily for secondary teachers, this course is a study of the traditional number theory concepts and theorems with special attention to those of significance to the high school curriculum. Emphasis will be on the historical as well as the theoretical development of the subject.
    Prerequisites: undergraduate major in mathematics or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    MAT 5971 - Number Systems and Algebra for Middle Grades Teachers (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Designed primarily for teachers of mathematics at Grades 6-8, this course is a deep and connected study of number and operations, and of algebra, including rational numbers, proportional reasoning, and linear relations. Emphasis will be on rich tasks using representational tools and models to explore mathematical relationships. Problem solving, reasoning and proof, and mathematical communication will also be emphasized. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: enrollment in the Master of Arts in Middle Grades Education program, or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    MAT 5972 - Geometry and Measurement for Middle Grades Teachers (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Designed primarily for teachers of mathematics at Grades 6-8, this course is a deep and connected study of geometry and measurement, including the van Hiele model of geometric learning; shape, size, and symmetry; perimeter, area, surface area, and volume; classical and transformational geometry; the golden ratio, tessellations, and spherical geometry. Emphasis will be on rich tasks using representational tools and models to explore mathematical relationships. Problem solving, reasoning and proof, and mathematical communication will also be emphasized. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: enrollment in the Master of Arts in Middle Grades Education program, or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    MAT 5973 - Data Analysis and Probability for Middle Grades Teachers (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Designed primarily for teachers of mathematics at Grades 6-8, this course is a deep and connected study of data analysis and probability, including data collection, organization, and display; measures of spread and center; inferences and predictions based on data; and basic concepts of probability. Emphasis will be on rich tasks using representational tools and models to explore mathematical relationships. Problem solving, reasoning and proof, and mathematical communication will also be emphasized. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: enrollment in the Master of Arts in Middle Grades Education program, or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    MAT 5980 - Special Topics in Mathematics Education (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A flexible program of reading, study, planning, and writing designed to meet the needs of individual teachers or groups of teachers in the field of secondary school mathematics.
    Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in mathematics and recommendation of graduate advisor. May be taken up to a total of fifteen semester hours.
  •  

    MAT 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. MAT 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  •  

    MAT 5999 - Thesis (1-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.

Statistics

  •  

    STT 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    STT 5811 - Statistical Concepts and Applications I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course introduces students at the post-calculus level to statistical concepts, applications, and theory. Topics include: counting methods, basic probability, sampling methods, an introduction to the most common discrete and continuous random variables, sampling distributions, and single parameter inferential methods including confidence intervals and hypothesis testing using large-sample methods, exact methods, and computationally intensive methods such as the bootstrap. Statistical concepts will be developed through simulations, and applications will focus on statistical problem-solving. The course will introduce prospective college teachers to the content and pedagogy recommended in the American Statistical Association’s Guidelines with regard to statistics and probability.
    Prerequisite: MAT 1120 (Calculus with Analytic Geometry II) and STT 2810 (Introduction to Statistics) or equivalent course.
  •  

    STT 5812 - Statistical Concepts and Applications II with Probability Modeling (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is a continuation of STT 5811 . Topics include: an introduction to the design of experiments, exploring and modeling relationships between variables, including chisquare analysis, regression models, ANOVA, and logistic regression. Inferential procedures for each of these models will also be covered. Computationally intensive methods, such as permutation tests, will also be introduced. Statistical concepts will be developed through simulations, and applications will focus on statistical problem-solving and appropriate communication of results of a statistical analysis. Students will use two or more statistical software packages during the course. The goal of the course is to provide sufficient theory and methodology to prepare students to teach the introductory level statistics course.
    Prerequisite: STT 5811  or permission of instructor.
  •  

    STT 5820 - Design and Analysis of Experiments (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course begins with a review of sampling, sampling distributions, and simple comparative experiments. Single factor experiments with both fixed and random effects are considered. Designs illustrated include randomized blocks, latin squares and factorial experiments. Mixed models and rules for expected mean square are presented. Model adequacy, sample size considerations, power determinations and restrictions on randomization procedures are discussed. The use of statistical software packages is integrated throughout the course.
    Prerequisite: STT 3820 (Statistical Methods I), or permission of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with STT 4820.]
  •  

    STT 5830 - Linear Regression Models (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An introduction to least squares estimation in simple and multiple regression models. The matrix approach is used in the more general multiple regression model. Considerable attention is given to the analysis of variance, aptness of the model tests, residual analysis, the effects of multicollinearity, and variable selection procedures.
    Prerequisites: MAT 2240 (Intro to Linear Algebra) and STT 3830 (Statistical Methods II) or equivalent.
    [Dual-listed with STT 4830.]

Department of Philosophy and Religion

philrel.appstate.edu

Kevin Schilbrack, Chair
schilbrackke@appstate.edu

Programs

Graduate Minor

Courses

Philosophy

  •  

    PHL 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    PHL 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    PHL 5649 - Seminar (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An intensive study of special problems, topics, or issues related to the study of philosophy. The subject matter of this course will vary and barring duplication of subject matter, a student may repeat the course for credit.
    Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or consent of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with PHL 4549.]
  •  

    PHL 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. PHL 5989 does not count toward a degree.

Religious Studies

  •  

    REL 5400 - Religion in Appalachia (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An examination of the origins, history, contemporary practices, and beliefs of the people of the Southern Appalachia region. Attention will be given to religion within the formal structure of the church, within the social structures of mountain life and as a component of individual identity.
  •  

    REL 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    REL 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    REL 5649 - Seminar (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An intensive study of special problems, topics, or issues related to the study of religion. The subject matter of this course will vary and barring duplication of subject matter, a student may repeat the course for credit.
    Prerequisite: one course in religious studies or consent of the instructor.
  •  

    REL 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.

Department of Physics and Astronomy

physics.appstate.edu

Michael Briley, Chair
brileymm@appstate.edu

Brad Johnson, Graduate Program Director
johnsonbg2@appstate.edu

The MS program is designed to prepare individuals for technical careers in industrial, governmental, and independent laboratories as well as for teaching positions at the community college level. It may also serve as an intermediate step for those who later elect to pursue a Ph.D. in applied physics, engineering physics, engineering, nanoscience, material science or a related area.

Graduate students will choose a research area of Applied Physics, Atmospheric Physics, Biophysics and Optical Sciences, Nanoscience, Electronics Instrumentation, Optics Instrumentation, or Astronomical Instrumentation and Observations.

The concentration in Systems and Laboratory Automation is a more traditional MS program that contains thesis and non-thesis options. The other concentrations are professional science master’s (PSM) concentration, which require a core of business and communications courses (12 semester hours). The PSM concentrations do not have a thesis option, but require an internship.

Programs

Master of Science

Graduate Minor

Courses

Astronomy

  •  

    AST 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An intensive study of a single topic in astronomy or astrophysics.

Physics

  •  

    PHY 5011 - Applied Physics Colloquium (0)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to introduce students to a wide variety of physics research and research in other disciplines by attending colloquia on campus. All graduate students are expected to attend all departmental and other designated colloquia. Students must enroll at least two times.
  •  

    PHY 5020 - Computational Methods in Physics and Engineering (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A course designed to introduce the student to modern techniques and algorithms in computational physics, involving solutions of real physical systems using techniques from interpolation, optimization, non-linear least squares, the numerical integration of ordinary and partial differential equations, Monte Carlo methods, Fourier analysis and stability analysis. Applications of these techniques will be selected from the areas of mechanics, optics, modern physics, astrophysics, engineering, signal processing, and electromagnetism. Graduate students will, in addition to the lab, carry out a major computational project which will address an important or relevant problem in physics, astrophysics or engineering. Programming will be carried out in a computer language such as ‘C’ or Fortran.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. [Dual-listed with PHY 4020.]
  •  

    PHY 5330 - Digital Electronics (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides an introduction to digital electronics, with an emphasis on the study of components that are building blocks for digital devices and equipment, especially microcomputers. Emphasis will be placed on the design of combinatorial, sequential, and state machine (ASM) circuits, including simplification by Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, and computer-aided tools. Hardware description languages will be used to implement designs on programmable logic devices (PLD). Topics to be covered include: number systems, Boolean algebra, logic families, gates, flip-flops, medium scale integration devices, combinatorial and sequential circuits, ASM, PLD, arithmetic logic units, memory, input-output, D/A, A/D, and a generic CPU. The industry-oriented, hands-on labs involve circuit construction, testing and trouble-shooting using modern test equipment.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with PHY 4330.]
  •  

    PHY 5400 - Professional Skills (1)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to help students develop important professional skills such as leadership, networking, interview skills, self- promotion, resume writing, and cover letter writing, all geared toward the field of engineering physics. Students will complete assignments related to these skills and are expected to attend all guest lectures designed to help students with professional skills. Students should enroll in one of their last two semesters of study.
    Prerequisites: Open to students admitted to the Engineering Physics graduate program or with permission of the instructor.
  •  

    PHY 5405 - Graduate Seminar (1)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to help students incorporate the skills of effective communication in Engineering Physics. Students will be required to present their research or internship experience in writing and through oral presentations. Students should enroll in one of their last two semesters of study after completing research or an internship.
    Prerequisites: Open to students admitted to the engineering physics graduate program or with permission of the instructor.
  •  

    PHY 5430 - Digital Systems (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    Design and implementation of digital systems. This applications-oriented course covers designing digital systems and using hardware description languages such as VHDL to implement them with complex programmable logic devices (CPLD) or field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). Topics covered include CPLD and FPGA architectures, real-world digital design difficulties (timing, noise, etc.), the design and implementation of combinatorial, sequential, and SSI / MSI / LSI circuits, algorithmic state machines, and simple CPUs.
    Prerequisite: PHY 4330/PHY 5330  or the equivalent.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours
  •  

    PHY 5435 - Laboratory Automation (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    A rigorous applications-oriented course designed to foster an in-depth understanding of both the hardware and software aspects of laboratory automation. Personal computers are used to control laboratory instruments, collect and analyze data, and plot results. Topics covered include the use of data acquisition and control cards, serial and IEEE-488 interfacing, and coordinated data collection and control. State-of-the-art data acquisition languages are used extensively in the laboratory.
    Prerequisite: PHY 5330  and either PHY 5020  or PHY 5735 .
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours
  •  

    PHY 5440 - Modern Instrumentation Design (4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of the role of microprocessors and microcontrollers in modern instrumentation. Students will utilize hardware/software real time development systems in the design and construction of basic instruments.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours
  •  

    PHY 5450 - Programmable Logic Controllers (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides an introduction to the Allen-Bradley CompactLogix Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), industrial hardware components, and a variety programming languages including Ladder Logic, Structured Text and Sequential Function Chart. Students will complete laboratory exercises that simulate real-world industrial process-control and automation. PLC networking, Human-Machine Interface (HMI) design and control/feedback circuitry will also be explored.
    Corequisite: PHY 4330/5330
  •  

    PHY 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    PHY 5520 - Data Transmission and Signal Processing (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of local area networks, broad band and base band transmission, optical fiber transmission, analog signal analysis and filtering, and discrete signal processing.
    Prerequisites: PHY 5620 , PHY 5440  or equivalent.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours.
  •  

    PHY 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An intensive study of a single topic in physics.
  •  

    PHY 5550 - Directed Research in Applied Physics (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An original research project will be chosen, formulated and executed by the student under the guidance of a faculty member. Individual faculty will determine assessment tailored to the student’s particular research project.
  •  

    PHY 5620 - Optics (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A rigorous introduction to geometric and wave optics with applications including lasers, interferometers, spectroscopy, telescopes, fiber optics, and remote sensing. Basic electromagnetic wave theory is employed to describe the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter including absorption, dispersion, reflection, and scattering. Geometric optics is employed to study image formation by optical systems using both ray-tracing and matrix optics methods. Wave optics is used to study interference, diffraction, and coherence. This leads into a detailed lab-based unit dealing with interferometry and optical system alignment, with applications to optical component testing, spectral analysis of light sources, and coherence. The course also includes a semester synthesis project.
    Prerequisite: PHY 3001. Analytical Methods in Physics or equivalent (with a grade of “C” or higher) or permission of instructor.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours [Dual-listed with PHY 4620.]
  •  

    PHY 5635 - LabVIEW Interfacing and Robotics (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    An applications-oriented course designed to create programs written in the LabVIEW language for hardware interfacing. Data acquisition and control hardware is used to collect data from sensors and instruments which is then analyzed and displayed using LabVIEW. The hardware is also used to control devices such as motors and a five-axis robotic arm. Other topics covered include rotary encoders, state machines, and PID control. The topics covered will prepare students to take the National Instruments CLAD certification exam.
    Prerequisite: PHY 5020  or PHY 5735  or PHY 5740 .
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours
  •  

    PHY 5730 - Analog Systems (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    The theory and operation of DC and AC circuits with discrete passive and active components. Included are resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, and operational amplifiers. An in- depth analysis of circuit theorems, phasors, differential equations, and simulations predicting the behavior of systems of analog devices will be explored in lecture and laboratory. The use and limitations of common electronics instrumentation such as multimeters, oscilloscopes, and function generators will also be explored.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours [Dual-listed with PHY 4730.]
  •  

    PHY 5735 - Microcontrollers (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    An in-depth study of the architecture, programming and interfacing of microcontrollers. Topics to be covered include: introduction to microcontrollers, architectures, internal hardware (such as timers, serial ports, A/Ds, D/As, I2C), instruction sets, assembly language programming, interrupt-driven code, and interfacing. Both stand-alone microcontrollers and single board computers will be used in lab. Most labs will involve interfacing microcontrollers to devices such as switches, LEDs, keypads, 7-segment displays, LCD displays, motors, sensors, etc. Microcontroller simulators and in-circuit-emulators (ICE) will be used for debugging.
    Prerequisite: PHY 5330  or the equivalent
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours
  •  

    PHY 5740 - Sensors and Transducers (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    This applications-oriented course covers the integration of transducers into sensor-based systems. Students will integrate transducers with signal conditioning circuitry and will develop proficiency in interfacing the conditioned signals with data acquisition hardware, using programs such as the National Instruments LabVIEW software program. Sensors covered include, but are not limited to, temperature, pressure, optical, and humidity.
    Prerequisite: PHY 5730  or equivalent
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  •  

    PHY 5845 - Nanoscience and Technology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A survey of the current state of nanoscience and nanotechnology from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. Topics include, but are not limited to, nano-fabrication, tools (e.g. SEM, STEM, FIB, STM, AFM, etc.), nanomechanics, nanomaterials, Buckyballs and nanotubes, thin films, nano self-assembly, nano-scale heat transfer, thermoelectric devices, and nano-optics. Where applicable, content will be enhanced through direct experience with the available instrumentation.
    [Dual-listed with PHY 4845.]
  •  

    PHY 5850 - Advanced Materials Science Laboratory (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides an understanding of the relationship between structure and properties for materials via advanced laboratories. This course broadly covers material systems including: metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, semiconductors, and nanomaterials. Laboratories include the characterization of material properties and structure with advanced microscopies, tensile testing of metals, and synthesis of polymers,
    metal nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes, among others.
    Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the engineering physics graduate program or with permission of the instructor.
  •  

    PHY 5860 - Physical Principles of Electron Microscopy (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides an overview of the fundamental principles,instrumentation, and methods of scanning electron microscopy, including all electron optical components (electron sources and guns, electron lenses, deflectors, and stigmators) and complete electron optical system physics. This overview is complemented by a thorough investigation of the electron beam-solid interaction physics and the resulting measurable signals. Image formation physics and a wide range of applications including qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques are fully developed in this course.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with PHY 4860.]
  •  

    PHY 5900 - Internship (1-12)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Supervised work in applied physics in an industrial or other laboratory setting. Students must obtain approval of the departmental internship coordinator prior to enrolling.
  •  

    PHY 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  •  

    PHY 5999 - Thesis (3-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Course may be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours.

Department of Psychology

psych.appstate.edu

Rose Mary Webb, Chair
webbrm@appstate.edu

Twila Wingrove, Program Director for Psychology, Experimental Concentration
wingroveta@appstate.edu

Denise Martz, Interim Program Director for Psychology, Clinical Concentration
martzdm@appstate.edu

Timothy Huelsman, Program Director for Industrial-Organizational Psychology and Human Resource Management
huelsmantj@appstate.edu

Pamela Kidder-Ashley, Program Director for School Psychology
ashleypk@appstate.edu

Industrial-Organizational Psychology and Human Resource Management: The Department of Psychology participates jointly with the Department of Management to offer an interdisciplinary Master of Arts degree in Industrial-Organizational Psychology & Human Resource Management. This interdisciplinary M.A. degree is designed to equip students with advanced specialized training in human resource management. Students will have the opportunity to develop knowledge of theories, methods, and research findings and to acquire skills in applying this knowledge to organizational activities such as employee recruitment, selection, motivation, training and development, and performance appraisal. The program consists of 51 semester hours that include required course work in both the Psychology Department and the Management Department. Either an internship or a thesis is required.

Psychology: The Master of Arts in Psychology has two concentrations: Clinical and Experimental.

Note: The Master of Arts Program in Psychology will be not be considering students for the clinical concentration beginning in Fall 2018 as our faculty awaits potential approval of a PsyD program from the UNC system.

The primary purpose of the Clinical concentration is to prepare the student to function competently in a variety of applied psychological, medical or integrative health care settings by developing evidence-based clinical skills. Through a program of course work, research training, and strong experiential learning requirements (practica and an internship), students develop multiple applied competencies, including diagnostic interviewing, cognitive and personality assessment, and prevention and intervention skills (e.g., psychotherapy, behavioral medicine, community level). Using a scientist-practitioner model, graduates are prepared for professional practice with eligibility for licensure as Licensed Psychological Associates in North Carolina, and are also prepared to pursue doctoral training.

The primary purpose of the Experimental concentration is to provide a sound program of intensive course work and independent research beyond the bachelor’s degree, based on a mentoring model with student - faculty academic and research relationships as a central component. Upon completion of this program, the student is prepared to pursue various scientific and applied activities. Most students choose to pursue doctoral work at other institutions.

School Psychology: The School Psychology program has been approved by the National Association of School Psychologists since 1991. Our program provides learning experiences grounded in the scientist-practitioner model that enable our students to become well-rounded, effective school psychologists. Our graduates are prepared to work with diverse populations in a variety of education-related settings and to practice competently, ethically, and from a scientific perspective in the major domains of school psychology practice, including consultation, assessment, prevention, intervention, training, diversity, home-school collaboration, and applied research. The program consists of 72 semester hours and requires three years of full-time study, including a year-long, full-time internship and completion of the PRAXIS-II exam in School Psychology. Upon successful completion of all program requirements, graduates earn Master of Arts and Specialist in School Psychology degrees and are eligible for licensure by the NC Department of Public Instruction as Level II School Psychologists and for the Nationally Certified School Psychologist credential; they also may apply for NC licensure as Licensed Psychological Associates.

For more information about the programs offered, please refer to: http://psych.appstate.edu/students/graduate

Programs

Dual Degree Programs

Master of Arts

Courses

Psychology

  •  

    PSY 5011 - Teaching of Psychology (1)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A course required of all graduate teaching assistants responsible for teaching one or more sections of PSY 1200 (General Psychology). Students will be introduced to alternative teaching approaches, guided in constructing tests, and provided information about teaching resources. Students’ success in teaching will be evaluated.
  •  

    PSY 5015 - Research Seminar (1)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A seminar on selected topics in research that allows students to gain experience related to all phases of empirical research, including review of relevant empirical literature, examination of appropriate research methods, and the dissemination process, including peer review, presentation, and publication. Course may be repeated up to four hours for credit.
  •  

    PSY 5020 - Research Methods in Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An examination of the procedures and principles involved with experimental, quasi-experimental, and other non-experimental research, including problem formulation, literature review, measurement issues, sampling, research design, data analysis, and report writing using APA format.
    Prerequisite: an undergraduate statistics course.
  •  

    PSY 5030 - Quantitative Methods in Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course continues the content of PSY 5020  and examines research/quantitative methods used in psychology. Students learn how to plan, structure, conduct and interpret statistical analyses. A written project is required.
    Prerequisite: PSY 5020 .
  •  

    PSY 5040 - Applied Psychological Research and Evaluation (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides students with the opportunity to acquire skills necessary to perform independent research and evaluation in field settings. It continues the content of PSY 5020  for those students who will be employed in applied settings (e.g., schools, hospitals, and governmental agencies).
    Prerequisite: PSY 5020 .
  •  

    PSY 5045 - Introduction to Human Resources and Professional Issues (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides an overview of the various human resource management functions in organizations, examines current issues that face human resource professionals, and helps to develop students’ teamwork, interpersonal, presentation and professional skills. Students will get an opportunity to employ the science-practitioner model and develop solutions to current issues facing human resource professionals.
    (Same as MGT 5045 )
  •  

    PSY 5055 - Leadership, Groups, and Teams (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to provide a broad perspective on leadership and teams in the fields of I-O psychology and human resource management. The course will be divided into two sections. The first section, on leadership, will examine both historical and contemporary views of leadership in organizations. The second section of the course, on work teams, will examine the dynamics that occur when individuals must work closely together toward a common goal. Students will examine the theory and research on teamwork and group dynamics, as well as the ways that teams are currently used and managed in today’s organization.
    (Same as MGT 5055 )
  •  

    PSY 5065 - Organizational Development (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the processes by which behavioral science knowledge and practices are used to help organizations achieve greater effectiveness. Emphasis on the nature, history, assumptions, strategies and models, intervention techniques, and ramifications of organizing development.
    (Same as MGT 5065 .)
  •  

    PSY 5070 - Organizational Behavior Management (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This seminar course will review current topics in the field of Organizational Behavior Management-Performance Management (OBM-PM). Readings and class discussion in Part 1 of the seminar will cover the application of the three-term contingency (ABC Analysis) and behavior analysis assessment issues. Part 2 of the seminar will focus on intervention strategies that have empirical evidence of their effectiveness in changing behavior in organizational settings. These include training, prompting, stimulus control, reinforcement, differential reinforcement, punishment, goal setting and feedback, and modeling. Part 3 of the seminar will allow the class to investigate recent topics in OBM (i.e., response generalization, establishing operations, resistance to change, rumors and gossip). Additionally, students will engage in an OBM related research project that will be developed into a Scholarly Product.
  •  

    PSY 5207 - Evolutionary Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course examines how human thinking, motivation, behavior, and social relationships can be understood from the perspective that many aspects of human behavior involve sets of processes designed by natural selection to solve adaptive problems faced by our evolutionary ancestors. Key topics may include: problems of survival, long-term mating, sexuality, parenting, kinship, cooperation, aggression and warfare, conflict between the sexes, status, prestige, social dominance, and how evolutionary theory can provide a unified approach to understanding the different branches of psychology.
    [Dual-listed with PSY 4207.]
  •  

    PSY 5208 - Forensic Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course will provide an in-depth study of the ways in which psychology and the law interact. It will include a study of the way in which researchers and mental health professionals contribute to legal issues as well as the ways in which research and mental health practice are governed by the law.
    [Dual-listed with PSY 4208.]
  •  

    PSY 5300 - Learning (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A comprehensive survey of the methods, findings, and theories of classical and operant conditioning in human and non-human learning. Skills necessary to evaluate, integrate, and summarize significant empirical literature will be developed.
  •  

    PSY 5310 - Cognitive Processes (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the primary research topics in cognitive psychology. Specifically, students should acquire detailed knowledge of the human information processing system and the memory systems that support it.
  •  

    PSY 5320 - Biological Bases of Behavior (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course concerns biological processes related to behavior emphasizing relationships between brain and behavior. The fundamentals of neuroanatomical, neurophysiological and neurochemical correlates of behavior and mental processes are explored. Basic aspects of neuroscience as related to some mental illnesses and neurological disorders are discussed.
  •  

    PSY 5330 - Developmental Seminar (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The purpose of this course is to expose graduate students to the major western theories of developmental psychology, to current research methodology, and to relevant developmental concepts. Students will gain a biographical and historical understanding of each theorist. A major goal of this course is for students to be familiar with recent research and modifications relating to the traditional developmental theories. In addition, graduate students in this course will have the ability to hone critical thinking skills and to engage in intellectual discourse through discussions.
  •  

    PSY 5340 - Seminar in Social Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The course will include an historical account of social psychology, as well as a critical evaluation of current issues and research in the area.
  •  

    PSY 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    PSY 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A special topic may be offered depending upon student and faculty interest. Permission of the instructor required.
  •  

    PSY 5552 - Diagnosis and Psychopathology (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Consideration of diagnostic practices of common psychological disorders, including symptom criteria, epidemiological data, with an emphasis on the acquisition of applied diagnostic skills. Content will often include a study of the origin, development, and manifestations of psychological and causal models with empirical support.
    Prerequisite: PSY 2212 (Abnormal Psychology) or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    PSY 5555 - Advanced Educational Psychology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides an advanced examination of research-based psychological concepts, principles, and theories that are relevant to teaching and learning, with particular emphasis on biological, cognitive, and psychosocial development; cognitive and behavioral learning theories; and individual and group differences.
  •  

    PSY 5562 - Psychology of Adulthood and Aging (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Overview of the Psychology of Aging, with coverage of sensory, cognitive, and socio-emotional changes relevant to applied professions. Emphasis will be on applications of existing theory and research, and on encouraging an understanding of how to understand and interact with adults of all ages. Graduate students will be expected to become involved in an area of research.
    [Dual-listed with PSY 4562.]
  •  

    PSY 5565 - Adolescent Psychology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of the physical, intellectual, and emotional changes that occur during adolescence. Relationships among physical development, mental growth, adolescent interests, personality, and social consciousness, will be explored.
  •  

    PSY 5583 - Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course offers a broad overview of health psychology and behavioral medicine to clinical health psychology graduate students or graduate students in an allied health field. This course represents a bio-psycho-social-spiritual approach to integrating evidence-based psychological services to treat medical patients in integrative health care settings (behavioral medicine) as well as interventions to individuals or communities to prevent the development or progression of medical diseases (health psychology). Students will gain an overview of psychologists’ roles in the U.S. health care system and how to modify behavior in clinical or public health settings to prevent/treat the leading causes of morbidity/mortality for U.S. citizens (e.g., heart disease, diabetes, chronic pain, obesity, etc.). This course will entail didactic learning through seminar-style discussion of select readings, clinical skills training necessary for psychologists in integrative health care settings, and intensive research of a health psychology topic embedded within a bio-psycho-social-spiritual model via individual/small group study.
  •  

    PSY 5584 - Community Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides an overview of the methodology, theory and application of the community psychology perspective to community mental health practice. The course focuses on both theoretical and methodological foundations of community psychology practice with an emphasis on rural environments. We will also consider the moral, legal, and ethical ramifications of community-level interventions.
  •  

    PSY 5593 - Biofeedback (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will review the historical background of biofeedback, stressing biofeedback as an aid in stress management, in the treatment of psychosomatic disorders and muscle relaxation, and in the physiological basis of self regulation. Students will have the opportunity to become familiar with the application of the EMC, ST trainer and other biofeedback instrumentation through demonstration and practice. Ethical issues are explored.
  •  

    PSY 5610 - Advanced Experimental Psychology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A critical study of the major experimental findings and of research methodology in contemporary psychology. Emphasis will be placed upon problems in human learning and cognition.
  •  

    PSY 5655 - Contemporary Issues in Psychology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An investigation and discussion of psychological phenomena using scientific methodology and empirical research to evaluate causal claims, evaluate research, assess validity and engage in critical thinking. A focus of the class will be the use of empirical research literature, as well as oral and written assignments to improve reasoning skills in order for students to become more critical consumers of information from both academic and popular sources. Topics will span multiple areas of psychology.
    Prerequisite: PSY 3100 (Research Methods in Psychology) or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    PSY 5660 - Staffing (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of techniques used in employee selection and placement. Emphasis is on job and task analysis and the application of psychology in recruitment, biographical data, interviewing, work samples, assessment centers, rating scales, and testing.
    (Same as MGT 5660 .)
  •  

    PSY 5661 - Performance Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The study of methods used to describe and measure work behavior. Specific attention is given to developing competencies in job analysis and performance management in order to facilitate the evaluation of employee contributions to organizational success.
    (Same as MGT 5661 .)
  •  

    PSY 5671 - Training and Development (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the roles, functions, and skills of human resource development professionals. Consideration given to such topics as the philosophy and psychology of HRD, the design and implementation of training and development programs, and the major program areas and organizational settings for HRD.
    (Same as MGT 5671 .)
  •  

    PSY 5672 - Advanced Organizational Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An examination of theory and research focused on individual and social processes in organizations. Topics include organizational research methods, job attitudes, mood, work stress, motivation, leadership, work groups and teams, prosocial behaviors, organizational culture and climate, and organizational theory and structure.
    (Same as MGT 5672 .)
  •  

    PSY 5700 - Cognitive Assessment (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A practice-based study of the development, standardization, and interpretation of a variety of cognitive and developmental measures including the Wechsler Scales and selected other individually administered psychometric instruments. Supervised practice in administration, scoring, and interpretation is provided.
  •  

    PSY 5701 - Personality Assessment (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A survey of the underlying theory, reliability, validity, and utility of several individually-administered personality assessment devices. Practice in administration, scoring, interpretation and report writing is included.
    Prerequisites: PSY 5700  and PSY 2212 (Abnormal Psychology) or equivalents.
  •  

    PSY 5702 - Psychoeducational Assessment for Intervention I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    As the first in a two-course sequence, this course introduces students to the foundations of psychoeducational assessment, including psychometrics and measurement; legal, ethical, historical, family, and diversity issues; and various methods and models for assessing students within the school context. Students will demonstrate competency in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of results of the most commonly used tests of academic achievement and learn to integrate results into comprehensive written reports with associated recommendations for interventions. Emphasis will be placed on the application of assessment data to address academic needs. Practice laboratory sessions are required.
    Prerequisite: admission to the School Psychology graduate program.
  •  

    PSY 5703 - Psychoeducational Assessment for Intervention II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    As the second in a two-course sequence, this course extends students’ knowledge and skills in school-based assessment for intervention. Students will have the opportunity to learn historical and theoretical foundations of intelligence as well as characteristics of and methods of assessing various educational disabilities. Students will demonstrate competency in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of results of the most commonly used measures of cognitive abilities, perceptual-motor integration, and adaptive behaviors and learn to integrate assessment data from multiple measures into comprehensive written reports with associated recommendations for interventions. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of assessment skills and methods attained during PSY 5702 - Psychoeducational Assessment for Intervention I (3) , as well as the application of assessment data to address instructional problems. Practice laboratory sessions are required.
    Prerequisites: PSY 5702  
  •  

    PSY 5704 - Emotional/Behavioral Assessment for Intervention (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course examines current models and methods of school-based assessment of the emotional, behavioral and social functioning of children and adolescents, as well as pertinent legal, ethical, historical, family, and diversity issues and relevant federal and state regulations. Supervised practice with a school-based case will be provided, and students will learn to integrate emotional-behavioral assessment results into a comprehensive written report with associated recommendations for interventions.
    Corequisite: PSY 5902 - Practicum II: School Psychology (3) .
  •  

    PSY 5705 - Psychotherapy: Foundations and Ethics (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course involves learning fundamental clinical skills including interviewing and basic clinical interventions. Legal and ethical principles in the practice of psychology are considered.
  •  

    PSY 5713 - Child Psychopathology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A critical evaluation of the development of common psychological disorders in children and adolescents. The emphasis will be on developing skills in differential diagnosis and understanding current research on etiology.
  •  

    PSY 5714 - Psychotherapy Interventions I (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A critical evaluation of the current major approaches to and research concerning psychotherapeutic behavior change with adults. A systematic review of empirically verified treatments for the most prevalent disorders will be provided.
  •  

    PSY 5715 - Psychotherapy Interventions II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A critical evaluation of the current treatments for bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, trauma-based disorders, personality disorders, and sexual dysfunctions. The empirical literature will be reviewed, and students will have the opportunity to learn to apply empirically verified treatment techniques for these disorders.
  •  

    PSY 5716 - Interventions for Children and Adolescents (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The main emphasis in the class will be on developing the necessary knowledge to effectively implement empirically supported interventions for children and adolescents in clinical and school settings. An in-depth review of the treatments for the most common childhood disorders will be provided.
  •  

    PSY 5717 - Assessment and Intervention Planning for Special Populations (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Advanced study of effective problem-solving, psychoeducational assessment, and intervention planning for such special populations as preschoolers, English language learners, and children with autism. Pertinent legal, ethical, and diversity issues and relevant federal regulations will be examined.
  •  

    PSY 5800 - Applied Behavior Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An advanced study of the philosophy, principles and procedures of applied behavior analysis and a review of selected research. Practical, ethical, and legal constraints on behavioral interventions are considered. Research conducted in institutional, educational and home settings is emphasized.
    Prerequisite: PSY 3100 (Research Methods in Psychology) or permission of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with PSY 4700.]
  •  

    PSY 5810 - Functions and Ethics of the School Psychologist (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    As an introduction to the profession of school psychology, this course reviews historical foundations, current practices, and emerging models in the field. Students critically consider current roles and functions of school psychologists, relevant state and federal laws and regulations, important ethical and professional issues, and the school psychologist’s relationships with parents, students, other school personnel, and relevant community resources. The course is designed to be a catalyst in the development of the student’s professional identity as a school psychologist.
    Prerequisite: admission to the School Psychology graduate program.
  •  

    PSY 5820 - Multi-tiered Prevention and Intervention (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course prepares students to use an evidence-based problem-solving process within a multi-tiered, school-based system of behavioral and academic supports, with a focus on prevention and early intervention. Students learn how to collaborate effectively with others to facilitate organizational change that promotes positive academic, behavioral, and mental health functioning of diverse populations in the schools and are trained in crisis prevention and preparedness using a curriculum developed by the National Association of School Psychologists.
    Prerequisite: admission to the School Psychology graduate program.
  •  

    PSY 5901 - Practicum I: School Psychology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is limited to graduate students in school psychology. The student will be placed in a public school setting one full day a week under professional supervision (both on site and in the university classroom). A minimum of 135 supervised clock hours must be completed. Tasks accomplished are commensurate with level of training.
  •  

    PSY 5902 - Practicum II: School Psychology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is limited to advanced graduate students in school psychology. The student will be placed in a public school or equivalent setting based on background and needs. Students work under on-site supervision and must attain a minimum of 135 supervised clock hours. Tasks accomplished are commensurate with level of training.
  •  

    PSY 5904 - Practicum I: Clinical Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Students will train in a professional mental health or medical setting for the equivalent of one day per week. Supervision is provided on-site by staff psychologists or other professionals. Weekly class meetings supplement the on-site training to provide additional group supervision as well as coverage of professional issues.
  •  

    PSY 5905 - Practicum II: Clinical Psychology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Students will train in a professional mental health or medical setting for the equivalent of one day per week. Supervision is provided on-site by staff psychologists or other professionals. Weekly class meetings supplement the on-site training to provide additional group supervision as well as coverage of professional issues.
  •  

    PSY 5906 - Practicum III: Clinical Psychology (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Practicum experience is available to students in the MA program in Psychology: Clinical track. Students will train in a professional mental health or medical setting. Supervision is provided on-site by staff psychologists or other professionals. Weekly class meetings supplement the on-site training to provide additional group supervision as well as coverage of professional issues.
    Prerequisite: permission of the program director.
  •  

    PSY 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. PSY 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  •  

    PSY 5998 - Thesis Proposal (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    PSY 5999 - Thesis (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisite: PSY 5998 .
  •  

    PSY 6620 - School-Based Consultation (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    For school psychologists, counselors and other human service personnel in various fields who deal with parents and/or teachers in a consultative and educational capacity. The course will include a review of consultation models and theories of both a group and triadic nature. It will also provide an opportunity for role play which reflects actual consulting situations. Emphasis will be placed on concerns related to academic deficit, behavioral problems in the school and home, and family stress.
    (Same as HPC 6620 .)
  •  

    PSY 6621 - Advanced Consultation (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides advanced training that focuses on building fluency in (a) consultation skills, (b) functional assessment that is linked directly to intervention, and (c) evidence-based interventions for social/behavioral concerns.
    Prerequisites: PSY 6620 /HPC 6620  or PSY 5800  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    PSY 6900 - Internship (1-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Internships are required for students in the Clinical Psychology and School Psychology programs and are an option for students in the Industrial- Organizational Psychology and Human Resource Management (I/O-HRM) program. The requirements are listed below. Clinical Psychology: Placement in a mental health setting practicing psychology to include experience administering psychological evaluations, individual or group psychotherapy and behavior change, and consultation with relevant professionals and community agencies, supervised by a psychologist. Students must complete a minimum of 600 hours and many sites require 1,000+ hours. Prerequisite: approval of the internship instructor and the Clinical Health Psychology program director. Graded on an S/U basis. May be repeated for a total credit of six semester hours. School Psychology: Placement in a school setting under appropriate professional supervision for 1,200 hours, on a full-time basis over two consecutive semesters (6 credit hours per semester), or on a half-time basis over four consecutive semesters (3 credit hours per semester); to include experience with psychoeducational problem solving and assessment; individual and group counseling; collaborative consultation with parents, teachers, interdisciplinary teams, and community agencies; behavior change strategies; in-service training; and applied research. Successful completion of the internship is required of all students enrolled in the School Psychology program. Graded on an S/U basis. Industrial/Organizational-Human Resource Management: Placement in an applied setting in which students can gain experience in various aspects of human resource management and development. Students will develop skills in personnel selection and placement, performance, appraisal, attitude measurement, motivation of employees, training and development of change within organizations. Student should enroll in MGT 5900  and are expected to complete a minimum of 400 hours over a period of ten weeks.
    Graded on an S/U basis.

Department of Sociology

soc.appstate.edu

Amy Dellinger Page, Chair
pagead@appstate.edu

Gerontology

Bradley Nash, Jr., Graduate Program Director
nashb@appstate.edu

The Gerontology program prepares students for careers requiring graduate-level knowledge and skills in the field of aging. The program emphasizes knowledge about the psychological, sociological, and biological processes of normal aging as they affect the diverse and rapidly growing population of older adults in the state and the nation. Theory, research and professional career preparation are emphasized, as is knowledge and understanding of public policies implemented through federal and state programs.

Students are encouraged to develop their own unique aging-related area of specialization. (Recent creative examples include the aging of the inmate population and the growth of eating disorders among middle-aged women.) Faculty assist students with their research, which can lead to conference presentations and/or publications.

The Graduate Certificate can be completed in either one or two years. It is designed to develop or supplement aging-related knowledge and skills for (1) students in other master’s degree programs; (2) students “testing the waters”, that is, who are considering but do not yet want to commit to a master’s degree program; (3) employees who desire a Gerontology credential, but who do not want or need a master’s degree; (4) others with a personal or professional interest in aging and elders.

Graduates of the Graduate Certificate program have found jobs in both the public and private sectors, ranging from direct work with older persons to managerial/administrative positions. The program is approved by the NC Division of Health Service Regulation to offer the Administrator-in-Training Program for students who want to obtain assisted living facility administrator licensure.

The Graduate Certificate program can be completed 100% online so students can schedule coursework and assignments around their job, family and other obligations. There is no requirement to be logged on at a particular day or time, nor is there any online course requirement to come to the main campus. Other elective courses are offered only on campus.

Sociology

Bradley Nash, Graduate Program Director
nashb@appstate.edu

The Graduate Certificate in Sociology is designed to provide a solid post-baccalaureate foundation in Sociology. The six required courses:

  • comprise the basis of a master’s degree in Sociology, and
  • qualify Certificate recipients who also hold a master’s degree in a field other than sociology to teach Sociology courses in most colleges and universities nationwide.

The curriculum provides graduate-level expertise for teaching the most common Sociology courses (Introduction to Sociology, Social Problems, Marriage and Family). It also develops expertise in other standard Sociology sub-disciplines that are useful per se and that will enhance the teaching of Sociology (Sociological Theory, Research Methods, Social Stratification).

The Graduate Certificate in Sociology is 100% on-line and asynchronous, so students can schedule coursework and assignments around their job, family and other obligations. There is no requirement to be logged on at a particular day or time, nor is there any requirement to come to the main campus.

By taking two courses per semester (Summer, Fall and Spring), the Graduate Certificate in Sociology can be completed in one calendar year. The program is cohort based, each cohort commencing in the Summer term.

Programs

Graduate Certificate

Courses

Sociology

  •  

    SOC 5025 - Advanced General Sociology (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    Systematic critical analysis of the state of the sociology discipline and of major sociological principles and ideas.
  •  

    SOC 5110 - Advanced Research Methods I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Survey of social research methodologies. Includes the foundations of inquiry, theory construction, and the investigation of various approaches to the study of social phenomena. Topics covered include observation, non-intrusive research, content analysis, focused and unfocused interviewing, scale and index construction, sampling and survey research designs.
  •  

    SOC 5200 - Sociological Theory (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A review of the classical foundations of sociological theory and how they inform contemporary theoretical efforts in sociology. The explanatory and substantive emphases of current sociological paradigms are examined as well.
  •  

    SOC 5270 - Complex Organizations (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of theories of large scale organizations with a substantive, comparative analysis of types of organization such as bureaucratic, prison, hospital, industrial, scientific, and voluntary organizations.
  •  

    SOC 5300 - Appalachia in Social Context (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Examines the social relationships among the people who inhabit the geographical region known as Appalachia. Focus upon the social history, demography, and social institutions of the region.
  •  

    SOC 5350 - Contemporary Social Issues (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    A critical analysis of some of the major social issues in American society. Emphasis will be placed upon the theoretical and empirical implications of social attitudes toward the explanation, treatment, and public policy decisions related to these issues.
  •  

    SOC 5400 - Sociology of Adult Development and Aging (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A sociological approach to the study of the stages of adult life. This will include current theory and research on the processes of development and age-related changes during the adult years.
  •  

    SOC 5420 - Health Care and Aging (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An analysis of how aging related changes impact the range and delivery of health care programs. Issues considered include health, long-term care, elder abuse, family care giving patterns, health insurance models, and how cost, quality, and access impact health care for the elderly.
  •  

    SOC 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    SOC 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An opportunity to study a special topic or combination of topics not otherwise provided for in the sociology curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
  •  

    SOC 5550 - Housing for Older Adults (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Provides an understanding of specific traditional and alternative living arrangements for older adults. Students will explore the inherent conflict between long-term demographic trends and relatively recent housing policies that impact the available options. Information will come from government agencies such as the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Administration on Aging, private providers of specific housing alternatives such as Sun City, and advocacy groups such as AARP and the National Council on the Aging.
  •  

    SOC 5560 - Race and Ethnicity (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Critically examines how race and ethnicity are socially constructed, defined, and perpetuated throughout social institutions. Utilizes sociological theories and current research that demonstrate the extent of racial/ethnic inequalities. Social justice efforts to reduce racial and ethnic inequalities are also addressed.
    [Dual-listed with SOC 4560.]
  •  

    SOC 5600 - Political Sociology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand. Alternate years.
    An analysis of the social influences on political behavior, the relationship between political and other institutions, the uses and abuses of political power.
  •  

    SOC 5630 - Programs and Services for Older Adults (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course focuses on both policy and practice issues related to services for older adults. Drawing on basic and applied research, the current and long-term impact of an aging society on social institutions as well as relevant modes of practice in addressing the needs of the older population are emphasized.
  •  

    SOC 5650 - Women in the Justice System (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will explore issues related to women in the criminal justice system. It will examine the types of crime committed by women, treatment of women by police, courts, and the correctional system, women’s victimization by battering, rape, and harassment, and women in non-traditional criminal justice occupations.
  •  

    SOC 5710 - Rural and Urban Communities (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Analysis of the structure and functioning of rural and urban communities; social organization and change within and among communities.
  •  

    SOC 5750 - Social Stratification (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the distribution of wealth, power, privilege, and prestige. The course examines conservative, liberal, and radical explanations of human inequality. Cross-cultural and comparative analysis is used to focus on various problems of inequality and their consequences.
  •  

    SOC 5800 - Sociology of the Families (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The origin and development of the family as a social institution; the contemporary family in various cultures; the relationship of the family to the economic, political, religious, and educational institutions in American society.
  •  

    SOC 5900 - Internship: Field Experience (3-12)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Supervised placement in a setting which provides an opportunity to observe and practice sociological skills.
  •  

    SOC 5950 - Globalization and Population (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines how worldwide changes have given rise to global organizations, global inequities and some environmental degradation. Special emphasis is placed on how the population dynamics of fertility, mortality and migration underlie many global issues and create new conflicts.
  •  

    SOC 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  •  

    SOC 5990 - Advanced Research Methods II (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Content focuses upon quantitative and qualitative data analysis.
    Prerequisite: SOC 5110 .
  •  

    SOC 5999 - Thesis (1-6)


    When Offered: On Demand