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2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin
Appalachian State University
   
 
  Jan 16, 2018
 
 
    
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

Beaver College of Health Sciences

Contract All Courses |

Marie Huff, Dean
Denise Levy, Associate Dean
Gary McCullough, Associate Dean

http://healthsciences.appstate.edu

Appalachian’s Beaver College of Health Sciences opened in 2010 as the result of a strategic university commitment to significantly enhance the health and quality of life for individuals, families and communities in North Carolina and beyond. The college offers ten undergraduate degree programs and six graduate degree programs, which are organized in six departments:  Nursing, Social Work, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Nutrition and Health Care Management, Health and Exercise Science, and Recreation Management and Physical Education.

Students who choose the Beaver College of Health Sciences will learn in a collaborative model of education, research, and clinical outreach using state-of-the-art facilities. The college also emphasizes internships, research with faculty and study abroad experiences. You and your classmates will graduate as life-long learners who apply contemporary research to professional practice and who provide quality services in a respectful and caring environment.

Courses

College of Health Sciences

  •  

    CHS 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Subject matter may vary from term to term depending on student interest and need. A student may enroll more than once in a selected topics course provided that the content does not duplicate that of the previous course.
  •  

    CHS 5950 - Interprofessional Fieldwork (0)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Provides the opportunity to integrate knowledge acquisition in the classroom with interprofessional fieldwork experiences.
    Graded on an S/U basis.

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders

comdis.appstate.edu

Gail Donaldson, Chair

Speech-Language Pathology

Kim McCullough, Program Director
mcculloughkc@appstate.edu

Appalachian’s Master of Science degree in Speech-Language Pathology is devoted to the study of human communication and associated disorders and prepares clinicians for work in a variety of settings - schools, hospitals, nursing homes, community clinics, home health and private practice.

Students gain the academic and clinical practicum experiences necessary for certification by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, licensure by the North Carolina Board of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and advanced licensure by the N.C. Department of Public Instruction. Students planning to obtain the Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology must complete State Department of Public Instruction requirements for the “S and G” Advanced (Graduate) level license in Speech-Language Impaired. All students must complete an individualized program of study and admission to candidacy, have these forms approved by their advisors, and file the forms with the Graduate Records.

Admission to the Speech-Language Pathology Program is on a competitive basis. Students who wish to be admitted to this program must submit evidence of satisfactory performance in all undergraduate course work and on the general GRE test. The Program does not permit deferred admissions. Students who are offered admission for a given term, and who cannot accept admission for that term, must reapply and be considered at a later time.

Programs

Master of Science

Courses

Communication Sciences & Disorders

  •  

    CSD 5162 - Structural Analysis of Language (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A study of language content, form, and use with special emphasis on the acquisition of descriptive taxonomies for the classification of spoken language samples. The course includes guided and independent practice in language sampling and analysis procedures.
    [Dual-listed with CSD 4162.]
  •  

    CSD 5364 - Audiology (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    The science of hearing and the etiologies of hearing impairment.
    Prerequisites: CSD 2259 (Communication Disorders), CSD 2260 (Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism), CSD 2464 (Basic Speech and Hearing Science), and CSD 2465 (Basic Speech and Hearing Science Laboratory); or permission of the department chair.
    [Dual-listed with CSD 4364.]
  •  

    CSD 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    CSD 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    CSD 5561 - Introduction to Clinical Procedures I (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course provides instruction in methods used for intervention in speech-language pathology. Primary emphasis is placed on evidence-based remediation procedures for children and adults with communication disorders; implementing clinical approaches in a variety of settings; organization of clinical practicum; and writing skillful clinical reports, referral letters, IEPs, and IFSPs. Students will participate in clinical experiences.
  •  

    CSD 5565 - Clinical Practicum II (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Supervised second level practicum in evaluation and therapy techniques in speech-language pathology. Specific clinical assignments will depend on prior and concurrent coursework in the disorders areas. Assignments will be consistent with the workload formula in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders Graduate Student Handbook. Students may have an off-campus placement.
    Prerequisite: CSD 5561 .
  •  

    CSD 5566 - Clinical Practicum III (3 or 6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Supervised third level practicum in evaluation and therapy techniques in speech-language pathology. Specific clinical assignments will depend on prior and concurrent coursework in the disorders areas. Assignments will be consistent with the workload formula in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders Graduate Student Handbook. Students may have an off-campus placement. CSD 5566 may be taken for 6 s.h. alone, or for 3 s.h. credit concurrently with a 3 s.h. enrollment in CSD 5569 .
    Prerequisite: CSD 5565 .
  •  

    CSD 5569 - Clinical Practicum IV (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Supervised practicum involving evaluation and therapy techniques in speech-language pathology. Specific clinical assignments will depend on prior and concurrent coursework in the disorders areas.
    Prerequisite: CSD 5566 .
  •  

    CSD 5660 - Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Sciences and Disorders (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course provides instruction in evidence-based practice, including research and experimental design in communication sciences and disorders. The course will focus on the importance of evidence-based practice in communication sciences and disorders; scientific principles, methods and controls used in the field; design and analysis of research on groups and single subjects; levels of evidence in evidence-based practice; and constructing, writing, and presenting a research manuscript using evidence-based practice.
  •  

    CSD 5661 - Assessment and Evaluation (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    The philosophy and implementation of procedures for the evaluation of communication disorders in children and adults with emphasis on obtaining and interpreting case history data, conducting diagnostic interviews, and administering, scoring and interpreting data from diagnostic instruments used to evaluate articulation, language, fluency, voice, and motor speech disorders. Observation of and participation in diagnostic sessions are required.
  •  

    CSD 5662 - Management of Hearing Disorders (3)


    When Offered: Spring, Summer Session
    Studies of the habilitation/rehabilitation of hearing impairments in preschool and school-aged children and adults. Emphasis on prescriptive and resource curricular management. Includes audition training, speech reading methods, and a survey of hearing aid monitoring techniques.
    Prerequisite: CSD 4364/CSD 5364 - Audiology (3) .
    [Dual-listed with CSD 4662.]
  •  

    CSD 5663 - Disorders of Fluency (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Study of the etiology, evaluation, and management of disorders of fluency (including stuttering) in children and adults with a concentration on the major theories of causation.
  •  

    CSD 5666 - Voice and Resonance Disorders (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Study of the etiology, evaluation, and rehabilitation of functional and organic voice disorders in children and adults, including a review of the anatomic and physiological bases of phonation, respiration, and resonation; theories of voice production; and physiologic and acoustic correlates of voice disorders.
  •  

    CSD 5669 - Speech Sound Disorders (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Clinical application of current research in disorders of the speech sound system.
  •  

    CSD 5672 - Severe Communication Disorders in Children and Adults (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    A study of the communication development of children and adults with severe communication disorders. Emphasis will be placed on developing expertise in ongoing evaluation through standard and nonstandard procedures, program planning, and use of augmentative communication systems.
  •  

    CSD 5675 - Preschool Language Disorders (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A study of the evaluation and management of language disorders in preschool children, including models of language and language disorders, high risk factors, and interdisciplinary assessment, program planning, and intervention.
    Prerequisites: CSD 3366 (Communication Development), CSD 4162 (Structural Analysis of Language), or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    CSD 5676 - School-Age Language Disorders (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A study of the identification, evaluation, and management of language disorders in school-aged children and adolescents, with special emphasis on language development after age five, the role of language in educational contexts, formal and informal assessment strategies, alternative service delivery models, and specific strategies for intervention.
    Prerequisites: CSD 3366 (Communication Development), CSD 4162 (Structural Analysis of Language), or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    CSD 5678 - Written Language Disorders (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A study of the identification, evaluation, and management of written language disorders in individuals from birth to 18 years who are at risk for or who have been identified as having a communication and/or specific language impairment (SLI). A special emphasis is placed on the written language skills of these individuals in a variety of educational contexts (e.g., daycare settings, developmental preschool programs, public schools, etc.). Formal and informal strategies for assessment, alternative service delivery models, and specific strategies for intervention will be covered.
    Prerequisites: CSD 5675  and CSD 5676  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    CSD 5682 - Communication Disorders in Diverse Populations (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A seminar on the interrelationship of sociological variables and linguistic performance with special emphasis on communication differences and disorders among culturally and linguistically diverse populations, non-biased assessment of diverse populations, elective intervention approaches, and differing learning styles.
  •  

    CSD 5766 - Neuroanatomy and Physiology (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Basic anatomy and physiology of the central and peripheral nervous systems with special emphasis on neural systems involved in normal and disordered speech, language, and hearing.
    Prerequisite: CSD 2260 (Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism).
    [Dual-listed with CSD 4766.]
  •  

    CSD 5850 - Adult Neurogenic Communication Disorders (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Provides requisite knowledge for understanding, assessing, and treating language and cognitive impairments in adults with focal and diffuse brain injury. Students will learn about neural substrates for language and cognition, assessment principles, and treatment for aphasia, right hemisphere disorders, traumatic brain injury, and dementia.
  •  

    CSD 5851 - Motor Speech Disorders (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course provides instruction in the differential diagnosis and management of neurogenic speech disorders, including the dysarthrias and apraxia of speech.
  •  

    CSD 5852 - Dysphagia (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course provides instruction in the description, differential diagnosis, and management of swallowing disorders in adults and children. Discussion will include developmental, behavioral, structural, and neurogenic disorders and the cultural influences on eating behaviors.
  •  

    CSD 5900 - Internship (6-12)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An internship in the area of communication disorders.
    Prerequisites: completion of CSD 5566  or its equivalent and permission of the Communication Disorders faculty.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    CSD 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  •  

    CSD 5999 - Thesis (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring

Department of Health and Exercise Science

hes.appstate.edu

Kelly Cole, Chair

Scott Collier, Graduate Program Director 
esgrad@appstate.edu

The Master of Science in Exercise Science degree requires students to complete a minimum of 36 hours over a 2 year period. The exercise science program permits students to elect from three concentration options:

  • a Research Concentration that includes coursework and experiences to prepare students for future Ph.D. work;
  • a Clinical Exercise Physiology Concentration that includes coursework and experiences to prepare students for careers in clinical settings such as hospitals and rehabilitation facilities focusing on preventive and chronic disease management; and
  • a Strength and Conditioning Concentration that includes coursework and experiences to prepare students for careers in strength and conditioning, personal training, or sports performance.

Students are encouraged to assist in on-going research in the Departmental laboratories. In addition, students are encouraged to engage in research that culminates in a professional presentation or publication. The Clinical Exercise Physiology and Strength and Conditioning concentrations have required practicum or internship experiences. Research, teaching, and clinical assistantships are available for qualified students.

Programs

Master of Science

Courses

Exercise Science

  •  

    E S 5000 - Introduction to Research Principles and Design (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The application of research principles to the management/administration of sport and exercise, the physiological responses associated with exercise, and the biomechanical assessment of movement and sport skills. Emphasis shall be placed on the appropriate application of research design and the utilization of scientific writing skills culminating in the development of a research prospectus.
  •  

    E S 5060 - Practicum: Strength and Conditioning (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Practical application of scientific principles and concepts to physical conditioning programs. Students will participate in relevant practical activities involving or related to exercise science or sports medicine.
  •  

    E S 5200 - Exercise Science Seminar (1)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course will be open to first year graduate students in Exercise Science. Topics to be discussed will fall within the sub-disciplines of the field of exercise science and will vary from semester to semester. Evaluation will be on participation, attendance and presentation quality.
  •  

    E S 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    E S 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Courses may include topics such as: adult fitness and cardiac rehabilitation; perceptual motor development; motor development; physical education for the handicapped; motor assessment and interpretation.
  •  

    E S 5555 - Advanced Nutritional Aspects of Exercise and Sports (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of nutrition specific to physical activity and sport performance. The course utilizes reading, presentation, and discussion of published research on carbohydrate, protein, and fat consumption, digestion, and metabolism to demonstrate the importance of diet in exercise performance. A special concentration on ergogenic aids is provided.
    (Same as NUT 5555 .)
  •  

    E S 5560 - Research Project (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Selected broad research topical area of student’s choice concerned with conceiving and carrying to completion a research project. Each student will have an advisor for the research project and will present the findings to peers in a colloquium.
  •  

    E S 5591 - Biomechanical and Physiological Laboratory Assessment (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An introductory graduate course to provide experiences in data acquisition and problem solving through a variety of physiological and biomechanical laboratory techniques; a basic overview of sampling/recording techniques will be presented.
  •  

    E S 5592 - Data Analysis in Sport and Exercise Science (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Methods of acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data most often encountered in sport and exercise science will be included. Emphasis will be placed on descriptive methods, statistical methods and computer applications.
  •  

    E S 5600 - Analysis of Sports Performance (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is an overview of non-Olympic, Summer and Winter Olympic sports. It focuses on physiological and biomechanical requirements, and other performance characteristics and sport requirements. Typical resistance training programs for each sport will also be discussed.
  •  

    E S 5620 - Advanced Cardiorespiratory Physiology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This is an advanced course in cardiovascular exercise physiology designed to address specific principles and concepts of cardiorespiratory physiology as they apply to physical work. Topics such as cardiac function, blood flow, ventilation, oxygen transport and metabolism will be covered, focusing on cardiovascular control during acute and chronic exercise.
  •  

    E S 5623 - Exercise Physiology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the effects of exercise and training throughout the life cycle on bioenergetics, respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, neural, muscular, skeletal, and endocrine systems within the context of acute exercise and adaptation to habitual exercise.
  •  

    E S 5625 - Exercise Testing for Clinical Populations (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides experience in common clinical exercise testing procedures and interpretation for various chronic disease populations. Students will be required to conduct a variety of clinical exercise tests used in the assessment of common cardiopulmonary and metabolic chronic diseases used in clinical settings and hospitals. Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency through practical evaluations, written examinations, and group presentations. Emphasis will be placed on the student’s ability to independently manage exercise testing in preparation for leadership roles in a variety of clinical settings.
  •  

    E S 5645 - Current Trends in Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course details the functions of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems emphasizing pathophysiology and treatment Focus will be on current literature to address recent findings in disease and treatment.
    Prerequisite: E S 5620 .
  •  

    E S 5650 - Theoretical and Practical Aspects of Strength and Conditioning (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A comprehensive study of training theory and methods with an emphasis on the development of maximal strength, power, and anaerobic capacity. Also included is a brief review of neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, endocrine, and bioenergetic aspects of exercise and training, as well as hands-on experience in lifts, drills, and testing procedures.
  •  

    E S 5660 - Exercise Prescription and Chronic Disease Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A comprehensive overview of the physical, physiological, and metabolic responses of the human body to exercise testing and training in healthy individuals and in those with metabolic, cardiovascular, and/or pulmonary disease. The focus will be on exercise as both treatment and prevention of disease, as well as managing healthy and clinical populations in a safe and professional setting. Current literature will be included to keep students up to date with novel treatments. An overview of environmental and legal considerations in the prescriptive process will also be discussed.
    Prerequisite: E S 5620 .
  •  

    E S 5670 - Clinical Exercise Practicum I (1-2)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course will provide practical experience within several community-based clinical exercise settings. Students will be required to complete 50 contact hours within an approved clinical setting for each hour of credit. Potential clinical settings include cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation, cardiac testing, pulmonary testing, cancer rehabilitation and pediatric exercise programming.
    Prerequisite: E S 5625 .
  •  

    E S 5680 - Clinical Exercise Practicum II (1-2)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course will provide practical experiences within several community-based clinical exercise settings. Students will be required to complete 50 contact hours within an approved clinical setting for each hour of credit. Potential clinical settings include cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation, cardiac testing, pulmonary testing, cancer rehabilitation and pediatric exercise programming.
    Prerequisites: E S 5625  and E S 5670 .
  •  

    E S 5710 - Biomechanics (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This represents an advanced graduate course in the science of human motion with emphasis on theory and application of quantitative analysis techniques. Skills will be developed in both kinetic and kinematic sampling, recording, and interpretation procedures.
  •  

    E S 5900 - Internship (1-12)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A guided, practical experience at a qualified program site. Internship credit is determined by the ratio of 50 contact hours for one hour of credit for a maximum of 12 s.h.
  •  

    E S 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  •  

    E S 5999 - Thesis (2-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring

Department of Nursing

nursing.appstate.edu

Kathleen Rayman, Chair
raymankm@appstate.edu

Susan Lane, Program Director
lanesh@appstate.edu

Programs

Master of Science in Nursing

Courses

Nursing

  •  

    NUR 5040 - Theories for Advanced Nursing Practice (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to integrate theories from behavioral, social, applied, and nursing science to both individual patients for whom they directly care and to those individuals for whom they are indirectly responsible. Holistic concepts of human beings, health, nursing, and environment provide the foundation for comparing nursing theories. Exploration of theoretical frameworks relevant to nursing provides student knowledge to develop specific care concepts pertinent to cultural diversity, health promotion, and comprehensive practice. Special emphasis is on the integration and application of theory into advanced nursing practice.
    Prerequisite: Admission to MSN program.
  •  

    NUR 5050 - Educational Theories for Nursing Academic and Practice Settings (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course explores foundational knowledge required for the application of educational theories for the nursing profession. Major research based theories of adult learning, health communication, health literacy, simulation and technology, and knowledge development in nursing will be investigated. Students will assess the implications of these theories in academic and practice settings.
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: NUR 5040  
  •  

    NUR 5070 - Contemporary Issues in Nursing (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Summer Session
    This course enables students to analyze contemporary issues in nursing; including concepts related to quality improvement, patient safety, global health, rural health, healthcare policy, organization, technology in nursing, and financing, the global healthcare environment and perspectives, informatics, health disparities, and interprofessional practice. An emphasis will be placed on a systematic approach to the economic, legal and political factors that influence health care.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MSN program.
  •  

    NUR 5150 - Advanced Health Assessment for Adults (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course prepares the student to perform advanced health assessment of adults building on the student’s basic knowledge and skill acquired in undergraduate coursework. Emphasis is placed on the following: analysis of assessment findings to determine leading health needs for well individuals and those with health variances, health risk factor analysis, interprofessional collaboration, health promotion, health literacy, global health, rural health, and clinical decision making. Proficiency in performing a culturally sensitive, holistic, comprehensive health assessment and physical examination is expected upon course completion.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MSN program.
  •  

    NUR 5200 - Pathophysiology for Advanced Nursing (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course builds upon the students’ preparation of biological and physical sciences in the management of health promotion and wellness, disease prevention, and disease management of culturally diverse individuals. Emphasis is placed upon physiology and pathophysiological concepts in an effort to strengthen students’ scientific background and facilitate understanding of nursing and the etiology of physiological disruptions. Upon successful completion of this course the student will integrate broad, organizational, patient-centered and culturally competent concepts to pathophysiological understanding in the safe delivery, management, and evaluation of evidenced-based nursing clinical prevention and population care and services to individuals and their families.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MSN program.
  •  

    NUR 5250 - Nursing Research for Evidence-Based Practice (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to bring evidence-based practice to both individual patients for whom they directly care and to those individuals for whom they are indirectly responsible. Those skills include knowledge acquisition and dissemination, working in groups, and the application and utilization of research related to global and rural health problems and advanced practice nursing.
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: NUR 5040  
  •  

    NUR 5600 - Research Project (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer Session
    Implementation of an approved research proposal: collection and analysis of data, preparation of report and presentation of the project. May be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours.
    Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy.
  •  

    NUR 5715 - Instructional Strategies for Nursing and Infomatics (3)


    When Offered: Spring, Summer Session
    This course builds on the educational theories by developing classroom and clinical instructional strategies. Advanced technological knowledge and skills such as use of simulation are emphasized to enhance student learning in numerous settings. The course will include examination of a variety of instructional strategies for creating positive learning environments and evaluating pedagogical strategies. Emphasis is placed on the development and use of creative, interactive strategies and technology supported strategies that challenge and engage the learner.
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: NUR 5810  
  •  

    NUR 5800 - Advanced Pharmacology for Nursing (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    This course presents advanced pharmacological concepts as a foundation for theory and practicum courses. Related concepts of critical thinking, evidence-based practice, health literacy, rural and global health, interdisciplinary communication, legal and ethical parameters of practice, and care integration are applied through case study analysis, class discussions, and written assignments.
    Prerequisite: Admission to MSN program.
  •  

    NUR 5810 - Educational Tests and Measurement in Nursing (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to provide nurse educators with the necessary knowledge and skills to measure and evaluate learning outcomes in a variety of settings. Audiences may include nursing students, patients, or other nursing personnel. The concepts of testing, measurement, and evaluation are studied from a nursing perspective. Social, ethical, and legal issues associated with testing and measurement are explored along with continuous quality improvement for program evaluation.
    Prerequisites: NUR 5040 , NUR 5050 , NUR 5250  
  •  

    NUR 5820 - Nursing Program Development and Evaluation (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the ongoing process of development and evaluation of nursing curricula. The teaching, learning, and evaluation processes are examined from the standpoint of education and nursing research and the effect on various curriculum patterns with emphasis placed on the context-relevant curriculum. The course provides opportunities for examination of factors that influence curriculum development, implementation, and evaluation, as well as consideration of the integration of rural and global health concepts and use of technological strategies.
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: NUR 5050  
  •  

    NUR 5900 - Nursing Education Practicum (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Summer Session
    This course provides nurse educators with 120 hours of practical experiences in a teaching role. Students, under the guidance of a mentor/preceptor, design educational offerings based on identified learning outcomes. Best practices regarding instruction and evaluation for culturally diverse audiences are examined.
    Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    NUR 5901 - Advanced Clinical Practicum (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    This course represents a clinical learning experience with a preceptor in which the learner will have the opportunity to synthesize and integrate didactic learning, promote innovative thinking, and test new potential solutions to clinical /practice or system issues. The learner will also have opportunity to master patient care delivery skills as well as system assessment and intervention skills which require an understanding of organizational dynamics. Students will focus on a population of interest and a specific role. The course has both an adult health component and a health promotion component. Clinical conferences will be conducted online using discussion forums.
    Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.
  •  

    NUR 5999 - Thesis (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer Session
    Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy.

Department of Nutrition and Health Care Management

nhm.appstate.edu

Margaret Barth, Chair

Health Administration

hcm.appstate.edu

Sandi Lane, Program Director
lanesj1@appstate.edu

The MHA degree is a hybrid online program designed to meet the needs of working professionals. The educational mission of the program is to prepare individuals in advanced health care management and administration principles and applications. Graduates of the program will have the knowledge and competencies enabling them to lead a variety of health care organizations. Instruction in the MHA program combines theoretical foundation with applied principles of health administration and is delivered by faculty with applied work experience in the health care industry.

The MHA degree program is primarily an online program of 46 semester hours. The curriculum is structured around a core set of courses totaling 37 semester hours. Students will choose one of two concentrations in either Information Systems or Leadership for an additional 9 semester hours. Students can complete the program in two years of full-time study (9 semester hours per term) or three years of part-time study (6 semester hours per term).

Each academic year, students will spend two to three days in face-to-face instruction on the Appalachian State University campus in Boone and dates will be announced prior to the start of each academic year. For information about the format of the online program, please contact the Office of Distance Education: http://distance.appstate.edu.

Nutrition

Martin Root, Program Director
rootmm@appstate.edu

The Graduate program in Nutrition is a Combined Masters of Science / Dietetic Internship program only open to those who have completed an undergraduate degree in Nutrition or Dietetics from an accredited DPD program.  The Program is two years long including the intervening summer.  The first year is graduate courses on campus; the summer is research or preparation for research; the second year is the Dietetic Internship.  The Internship most frequently requires a move to other parts of North Carolina or beyond.  Students graduate prepared to take the Registration Examination to become Registered Dietitians.

Programs

Master of Health Administration

Master of Science

Courses

Health Care Management

  •  

    HCM 5210 - Foundations of the U.S. Health Care System (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides an overview of the evolution, determinant forces, and organizational foundations of the health care system in the United States as compared to other industrialized nations. The course is designed to provide a foundation of knowledge regarding key system policy, resources, processes and outcomes in the context of the Triple Aim of providing access, ensuring quality and affordable cost. The perspectives of health and health status of Americans are examined in the context of cultural, economic, social and political forces. Health care reform, and problems and issues with the current system are analyzed to provide a critical view of the future of health care delivery, in the context of the role of the manager.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MHA program or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5220 - Statistics for Health Administration (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Health care management requires a working knowledge of statistics in process control, quality improvement, interpretation of research, application of research, and the use of data analytics. Material in this course provides a statistical foundation for the other health care administration courses.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MHA program or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5240 - Health and Disease (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    This course explores the theories, principles and methods of managerial epidemiology. Content explores the definitions, theories and models of health, illness, and disease. Foundations of disease transmission, risk factors, diagnosis and treatment and tools used in epidemiology are discussed. Additional exploration of the foundations of population-based health management, health promotion and prevention are included.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MHA program or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5270 - Organizational Development and Behavior in Health Care (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course discusses and evaluates the theories, principles and concepts of organization development and design particularly related to behavior of health care organizations. The course focuses on the relationships and interdependencies of individuals, groups and teams, within the organization. Analysis of health care organizational structure and design in relation to performance are also covered in this course. The aim of the course is to enhance the skills, attributes and behaviors of managerial professionals working in the health services industry.
    Prerequisite: HCM 5210  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5570 - Financial Management for Health Organizations I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is the introductory health care finance course for MHA students. The course focuses on the most important accounting and financial management principles and concepts relevant to health organizations. It should be noted that the course is the first course in a two-course health care finance sequence. As such, it is designed primarily to provide knowledge of fundamental principles. The application of this knowledge will be the focus of the second financial management course (HCM 5575 ).
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MHA program or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5575 - Financial Management for Health Organizations II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course focuses on the application of finance (accounting and financial management) theory, principles, and concepts to health care organizations. Particular attention will be given to the financial implications of strategic decisions.
    Prerequisite: HCM 5570  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5590 - Performance Improvement Concepts and Applications in Health Care (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course explores the concepts of performance improvement in US health care organizations. Students learn and demonstrate the leadership and management approaches and skills necessary to promote a culture of performance improvement in a health services organization. Techniques, tools, and processes currently used by organizations to monitor and improve the quality of clinical, operational, and administrative functions are addressed.
    Prerequisite: HCM 5210  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5610 - Health Economics (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to provide the fundamental principles of economic concepts and evaluation methods as applied to the health care setting. Topics include: the role of prices, equity and efficiency, the production of health, the demand for health care, health insurance theory, the demand for health insurance, the market for physicians’ services, production and cost of health care in hospitals and nursing homes, labor issues, and cost effectiveness analysis.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MHA program or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5680 - Management and Human Resources in Health Organizations (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides a foundation of knowledge and skills applicable to the current issues in health care management with an emphasis on human resources management. Students will be exposed to key management principles and the laws, issues and concepts related to HR management. The course will use a combination of informative lectures and case study analyses to provide students with the tools and insight needed to explore a variety of health care management and human resource management issues.
    Co- requisite or Prerequisite: HCM 5210  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5700 - Health Care Informatics (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Information technology (IT) has become an essential component of any health care organization. Managers must understand the basics of organizational computing to effectively manage an organization. Computing in health care has recently received a lot of attention. Legislation regarding health care IT is constantly adapted. This course addresses health care legislation, IT governance, and an introduction to principles of systems life-cycles and project management.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MHA program or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5710 - Health Care Data Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Health care managers are faced with increasing amounts of data. The data collected in electronic health records and in administrative systems is often left untapped. Health care data management is meant to give students a background in how to handle data. The course will address data quality, reporting (intelligence), data warehousing, and the process of leveraging data (analytics). The project in this course includes substantial use of SAS Enterprise-Guide.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MHA program or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5720 - Data Analytics in Health Care (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is a survey of statistical and modeling methods which apply to data analytics. This course uses SAS to introduce methods of exploring data and testing hypotheses. Beyond learning the statistical tools, students will become familiar with SAS Enterprise Miner. The course will also introduce other statistical software which managers may be given.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MHA program or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5725 - Health Information Project Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Project management has become a key health care management skill. Project management is particularly vital in working with information technology. Students who pass this course should become familiar with standards set by the Project Management Institute. To enable students to better manage IT, the course covers the project management process, program management, and portfolio management. The course also covers IT and project governance principles.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MHA program or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5730 - Leadership in Health Care (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course emphasizes the development of leadership competencies through the analysis and application of the theories, principles and concepts of leadership particularly applied to health service organizations. Leadership competencies will be explored and assessed through application of and reflection on topics such as communication, relationship building, emotional intelligence, team work and transformational leadership.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MHA program or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5735 - Health Care Operations Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course informs and applies the theories, principles and concepts of operations management in health care organizations. The course focuses on improving clinical and administrative processes, ensuring efficient use of resources, maintaining quality outcomes, while accounting for the complex health care environment. Concepts of health care quality, financial and systems management are also covered in this course. The aim of the course is to develop skills, attributes and behaviors of managerial professionals working in the health care industry.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MHA program or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5740 - Marketing in Health Care (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course examines the strategic marketing processes of health services organizations. Topics include theories of buyer behavior and customer requirements, elements of the marketing mix, services as products, distribution channels unique to health services, pricing, and marketing communications. Marketing management topics such as research, planning and evaluating the marketing effort, branding, and personal sales are explored as well.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MHA program or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5800 - Executive Skills Development (1)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    This course is designed to serve as a bridge between MHA graduate coursework and the world of practice, with a focus on developing career planning and professional skills. Topics include career planning, communication skills, interactions between managers and clinicians, and interviewing skills.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MHA program or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5910 - Health Law and Policy (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to provide an introduction to the legal, ethical, and political environment of health care. This course will involve thinking critically about the evolution of U.S. Health Policy and the forces that influence health policy. The course will cover a variety of ethical and legal issues facing health care managers including: general contract law, antitrust compliance and litigation, the government regulation of health care, false claims, fraud and abuse, informed consent, hospital and provider individual and corporate negligence, the legal basis for hospital governance, and the principals and basis for health care malpractice insurance.
    Prerequisite: HCM 5210  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HCM 5950 - Strategic Management in Health Care (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    This course is an integrative course utilizing various methods for strategic planning and management of health care organizations. Techniques for determining strategies for unique services, integration of strategy, structure, and administrative systems will be discussed and applied. The course also will incorporate generic and health care specific policy, legal, and financial concepts as they relate to the strategic management process. Business planning for new service lines or ventures will be a focus of the course.
    Prerequisite: HCM 5210  or permission of the instructor.

Nutrition

  •  

    NUT 5000 - Research Methods in Nutrition and Foods (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Examination of research methodologies in nutritional sciences and food systems, familiarization with the relevant research literature, utilization of statistical techniques, collection and interpretation of data, and preparation of reports. Research proposals will be prepared.
    Prerequisite: a 3 s.h. graduate statistics course at the level of E S 5592 - Data Analysis in Sport and Exercise Science (3) .
  •  

    NUT 5205 - Maternal and Child Nutrition (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An in-depth study of nutritional needs and problems from conception through adolescence, both nationally and internationally. An examination of current trends in dietary intake, nutrition education during pregnancy and childhood, and the role of nutrition in child development.
    Prerequisite: NUT 2202 (Nutrition and Health) or equivalent.
  •  

    NUT 5210 - Nutrition for Older Adults (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An overview of the physiology, nutritional needs and nutritional status of older adults and the interaction of nutrition, disease and medication.
    Prerequisite: graduate level status
    Lecture three hours
  •  

    NUT 5220 - Advanced Concepts in Nutrition and Assessment (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the techniques used to measure and evaluate the nutritional status of individuals and populations. Development of the techniques and skills to initiate and maintain dietary changes.
    Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.
  •  

    NUT 5250 - Dietetic Practice I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A seminar class designed for students enrolled in the AP4 program (pre-professional practice program) to enhance and supplement supervised practice learning activities. Ethical issues and professional standards will be discussed. Instructors and guest speakers will present and discuss current research relevant to health care in the clinical setting including: nutrition assessment, nutrition education, health promotion, medical nutrition therapies, and interrelationships of clinical care to other systems. Students will be responsible for case presentations and discussion.
  •  

    NUT 5255 - Dietetic Practice II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A seminar class designed for students enrolled in the AP4 program (pre-professional practice program) to enhance and supplement supervised practice learning activities. Faculty and guest lecturers will present and discuss current research relevant to: the health care delivery system, administrative issues including foodservice delivery systems, quality management, nutrition care and education in community settings, and the legislative process. Students will be responsible for case presentations and discussion.
  •  

    NUT 5300 - Effective Rural Practice for Health Professionals (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Survey of rural health issues in the United States; simulated practice scenarios involving rural health settings; development of transferable cultural competence skills for successful rural health practice.
    [Dual-listed with NUT 4300.]
  •  

    NUT 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graduate students may broaden or intensify their program through individual research and involvement in a given area of nutrition.
  •  

    NUT 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An opportunity to study a special topic or combination of topics not otherwise provided for the nutrition curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
  •  

    NUT 5552 - Medical Terminology/Records (1)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to develop an understanding of the medical terminology and vocabulary utilized in medical records and health professions.
    Lecture one hour.
  •  

    NUT 5555 - Advanced Nutritional Aspects of Exercise and Sports (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of nutrition specific to physical activity and sport performance. The course utilizes reading, presentation, and discussion of published research on carbohydrate, protein, and fat consumption, digestion, and metabolism to demonstrate the importance of diet in exercise performance. A special concentration on ergogenic aids is provided.
    (Same as E S 5555 .)
  •  

    NUT 5900 - Internship (3-12)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A structured field experience supervised by department faculty. A proposal is to be submitted to the graduate committee and be approved for participation the semester previous to beginning the experience. No credit will be given for experience not previously approved.
    Prerequisite: 15 s.h. of graduate courses toward degree program and approved proposal.
  •  

    NUT 5901 - Research Project (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Implementation of an approved research proposal: collection and analysis of data, preparation of report(s) and presentation of project. NUT 5901 may be repeated for a total credit of four semester hours.
    Prerequisite: NUT 5000  and proficiency in statistics.
  •  

    NUT 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s level. NUT 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  •  

    NUT 5999 - Thesis (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring

Department of Recreation Management and Physical Education

rmpe.appstate.edu

Dale Adkins, Chair

Courses

Health Education

  •  

    HED 5650 - Drug Education and Prevention (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The primary focus of this course is to introduce the complexities of drug-related issues. The social, psychological, pharmacological, cultural, educational and political aspects of drug use, including alcohol and tobacco, are examined. In addition, the methods, materials and theories of drug abuse prevention in the school and community are discussed.
  •  

    HED 5710 - Teaching Sex Education Within a Family Context (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to help health educators learn and develop strategies for teaching family living and sexuality to different age groups such as elementary, middle grades, secondary and adults. Topics to be included are reproductive anatomy, physiology, STD and AIDS, varying cultural differences, and gaining community support. Each student will be responsible for developing appropriate curricular materials for the age group she or he will be teaching.
  •  

    HED 5730 - Teaching Stress Management and Emotional Health (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will explore the factors associated with the development of emotional health and the management of stress as a basis for understanding the healthy personality. Emphasis will be directed towards teaching stress management and emotional health within an educational setting. Practical aspects of health education and program planning will be discussed. Students will be encouraged to deepen their commitment to affective teaching by applying the principles of self-esteem building, behavior self-management, communication, and accessing appropriate resources.

Recreation Management

  •  

    R M 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    R M 5560 - Leisure and Aging (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course focuses on the leisure needs and characteristics of the senior citizen. Programs and resources designed to service the leisure needs of this population will be examined. Focus will be on program planning and development to meet problems inherent in leisure delivery systems for seniors.
    [Dual-listed with RM 4560.]
  •  

    R M 5561 - Field Laboratory in Outdoor/Adventure Programming (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    The primary focus of this course is to prepare students to design and implement a backcountry field experience. The class will be divided into three sections. The first section will be preparation and planning, followed by a five-day field expedition, and ending with an extensive assessment of the experience.
    Prerequisite: HPC 5440  or permission of the instructor.

Department of Social Work

socialwork.appstate.edu

Lauren Renkert, Chair

Kelly Williams, Graduate Program Director
williamska3@appstate.edu

Guided by an overarching framework of human rights, and grounded in human relationships and scientific inquiry, the mission of the MSW Program at Appalachian State University is to promote the health and well-being of individuals, families, groups and communities; prevent oppression, discrimination, social and economic injustice; and provide assistance to those in need. The MSW Program, informed by and engaged with regional, state, national and global community contexts, aspires to provide exemplary educational opportunities. The foundation curriculum for the Program is designed to prepare students for generalist social work practice within the distinct Appalachian culture of the region, as well as across national and international contexts.

Building on the foundation, students select from one of two distinct concentration curricula: the Individuals and Families concentration or the Community and Organizational Practice concentration. The Individuals and Families concentration curriculum provides students with specialized knowledge and skills to effectively practice with adults, children, adolescents, and families in a variety of settings. The Community and Organizational Practice concentration curriculum provides students with specialized knowledge and skills to effectively practice with communities and organizations in different locales. Appalachian’s MSW Program also seeks to enhance students’ knowledge and skills through a unique crossover design. The crossover design provides students specializing in one concentration vital exposure to content from the other concentration. Graduates of Appalachian’s MSW Program demonstrate firm generalist practice knowledge and skills as well as specialized practice knowledge and skills to successfully serve individuals, families, groups, communities or organizations.

Appalachian State University’s MSW Program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE).

Academic Credit is not awarded for life or previous work experience.

Entry with Advanced Standing: Applicants who are graduates of Council on Social Work Education-accredited Bachelor of Social Work degree programs during the seven years preceding application and who have earned average grades of 3.2 or greater in their undergraduate social work course work may apply, by letter, for Advanced Standing in the MSW program. Only graduates of such Bachelor of Social Work programs are eligible for Advanced Standing. The prerequisites and basic admissions criteria for Advanced Standing are the same as those for admission to the two-year program. Those admitted as Advanced Standing students are not required to complete the required foundation courses (S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , S W 5040 , S W 5200 , S W 5210 , S W 5220 , S W 5230 , and S W 5240 ).

Students admitted to Advanced Standing are required to enroll in and earn a grade of B or better in S W 5001 , Advanced Standing Transitional Seminar, and up to six hours of additional course work, if deemed necessary by the social work faculty at the completion of the Transitional Seminar. The number of hours required for advanced standing students is 33 semester hours plus up to 6 additional hours if deemed necessary by the social work faculty.

Location of Program: This program is offered on campus in Boone in the format described in this Bulletin. Off-campus, hybrid cohorts are also offered. To learn more about upcoming off-campus cohorts, please visit the Department of Social Work’s Distance Education website: http://socialwork.appstate.edu/graduate/distance-education

Programs

Master of Social Work

Courses

Social Work

  •  

    S W 5001 - Advanced Standing Transitional Seminar (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    This course is intended for students seeking advanced standing in the Master of Social Work degree and is open only to those with a Bachelor of Social Work degree from a CSWE (Council on Social Work Education) accredited program. Students enrolling in this course will be tested on their mastery of the content of the foundation year (the first 30 semester hours) of the MSW Program. Successful completion of this course, with a minimum grade of “B” or better, is required of all students seeking advanced standing in the Master of Social Work degree programs.
    Prerequisite: Admission to advanced standing in the Master of Social Work Degree.
  •  

    S W 5005 - Foundations of Social Work Practice (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is an introduction to MSW-level professional social work. It provides a comprehensive overview of the social, political and economic contexts that led to the emergence of the profession of Social Work, areas of social work practice and service delivery systems, and professional ethics and values. This class examines both personal and professional issues related to social work practice with a focus on sensitivity to, understanding of, and appreciation for diverse cultural backgrounds.
  •  

    S W 5010 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This is the first of two courses in the MSW foundation year that provide knowledge for understanding and assessing human behavior and interaction in varied social, cultural, and economic contexts as a necessary foundation for effective social work practice. The course will examine bio-psycho-social development from birth through early adolescence, utilizing ecological systems and life span/life course perspectives.
  •  

    S W 5020 - Practice with Individuals and Families (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This first practice course of the MSW foundation year includes development of basic social work skills regarding communication and interviewing, assessment and intervention, evaluation, and termination, with an emphasis on micro systems. There is emphasis on the application of social work theory, values and ethics to practice and adaptation of intervention approaches to meet the needs of vulnerable groups and diverse populations.
  •  

    S W 5030 - Foundations of Social Work Research (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Examines processes of theory building and a variety of scientific methods that provide the foundation for research in social work settings. Students will have the opportunity to learn about elements in social work research that include social work ethics, problem formulation, research design, data analysis and reporting, and utilization of research in social work venues.
  •  

    S W 5040 - Field Practicum and Seminar I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Supervised placement in a human service agency provides the student the opportunity to apply in a practicum setting material learned in the other MSW foundation courses. The practicum will include micro, mezzo, and macro levels of practice. The seminar will provide the student opportunities to explore field-based practice, policy issues, and theories. Students will complete 240 hours in the practicum.
  •  

    S W 5200 - Social Welfare Policy Analysis and Practice (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides an in-depth knowledge of the historical contexts of social welfare systems and social welfare policies, including the exploration of social problems, assessment of policy alternatives, analysis of policy implementation, prioritization of revisions, and introduction to strategies for policy change. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the impact of policies on varied client populations.
    Prerequisites: Successful completion of S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030  and S W 5040  or permission of the MSW Program Director.
  •  

    S W 5210 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This is the second of two human behavior courses in the MSW foundation year that provide a basis for effective social work practice. This course examines bio-psycho-social development from late adolescence through the late adulthood, utilizing ecological systems and life span/life course perspectives. The influence of macro systems on human development and behavior will be addressed.
    Prerequisites: successful completion of S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , and S W 5040  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    S W 5220 - Practice with Groups and Communities (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The course uses the knowledge and skills of social work and builds on this foundation to include groups and community practice. Knowledge of theories, models and interventions for group and community practice that are learned in the class are integrated and applied in the concurrent student field internship.
    Prerequisites: successful completion of S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , and S W 5040  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    S W 5230 - Evaluation of Professional Social Work Practice (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to provide students with the fundamental knowledge and skills to conduct planned evaluations of social work practice with varied client populations at the micro- and macro- levels.
    Prerequisites: successful completion of S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , and S W 5040  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    S W 5240 - Field Practicum and Seminar II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Supervised placement in a human service agency provides the student the opportunity to apply in a practicum setting material learned in the other MSW foundation courses. The practicum will include micro, mezzo, and macro levels of practice. The seminar will provide the student opportunities to explore field-based practice, policy issues, and theories. Students will complete 240 hours in the practicum.
    Prerequisites: successful completion of S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , and S W 5040 .
  •  

    S W 5245 - Social Work Practice in Health Care (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is an introductory seminar on contemporary health social work. It provides an evidence-based overview of the social, cultural, environmental, and political contexts affecting health promotion, prevention, and intervention on local, national, and global levels. Students will learn skills necessary for work in interdisciplinary health-related settings and develop a deeper understanding and empathy for the experience of health challenges.
    [Dual -listed with SW 4245]
  •  

    S W 5270 - School Social Work (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Study of the role and competencies of the school social worker as a member of the pupil personnel team in the U.S. educational system. Social work practice in the school setting with students, their families, and communities will be examined. The course will focus on addictions, disabilities, pregnancy, poverty, and serious behavioral difficulties. Discussion of NC school social work licensure, policies, current issues, and reforms in education will also be included.
    [Dual-listed with SW 4270.]
  •  

    S W 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Variable content.
  •  

    S W 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides students with an opportunity to study a special topic or combination of topics not otherwise provided for in the Social Work curriculum.
  •  

    S W 5700 - Advanced Social Work Assessment (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Building on beginning practice skills developed in the MSW foundation year, this required course in the Individuals and Families concentration will provide students with advanced skills for conducting comprehensive, social work theory-based assessments of individuals, couples, and families across the life span. In preparation for interdisciplinary practice, various theoretical perspectives regarding assessment and diagnosis and common classifications of mental health disorders, including diagnostic criteria, will be explored.
    Prerequisites: successful completion of the MSW foundation curriculum (S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , S W 5040 , S W 5200 , S W 5210 , S W 5220 , S W 5230 , and S W 5240 ) or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    S W 5710 - Advanced Social Work Practice with Families (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This practice course in the Individuals and Families concentration builds on the two practice courses and other content from the MSW foundation year, and integrates content from the advanced assessment course taught in this concentration. It is designed to provide students with theory, intervention techniques, and practice skills for social work practice with families across the life span and in the context of larger environments.
    Prerequisites: successful completion of the MSW foundation curriculum (S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , S W 5040 , S W 5200 , S W 5210 , S W 5220 , S W 5230 , and S W 5240 ) or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    S W 5720 - Individuals and Families Field Practicum and Seminar I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The field practicum consists of an agency experience that offers opportunities for advanced practice with children, adults, and families. Students will demonstrate advanced skills in assessment, intervention, and practice with children and adults using an ecological-systems and strengths-based perspective. The seminar will provide an opportunity for students to examine their practice and the influences of theory and policy on practice. Students will complete 240 hours in the practicum.
    Prerequisites: successful completion of the MSW foundation curriculum (S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , S W 5040 , S W 5200 , S W 5210 , S W 5220 , S W 5230 , and S W 5240 ).
  •  

    S W 5730 - Advanced Social Work Practice with Children and Adolescents (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is the second practice course in the Individuals and Families concentration under the MSW degree building on S W 5710 - Advanced Social Work Practice with Families (3) . It is designed to provide students with a theory, practice skills and techniques for social work practice with children and adolescents. Continued emphasis is given to a family systems theory and ecological systems and strengths-based perspective as it applies to treatment for children and adolescents within a social work practice context.
    Prerequisites: successful completion of S W 5700 , S W 5710 , and S W 5720  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    S W 5740 - Advanced Social Work Practice with Adults (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is the fourth required in the Individuals and Families concentration under the MSW degree. Building on content regarding advanced assessment and practice with families in context, this course provides students with theory, intervention techniques, and practice skills for advanced social work practice with adults across the life span. Attention to the vast differences among adults, and to the meanings and influence of diverse cultures, organizations, and institutions, will serve as the framework for this course.
    Prerequisites: successful completion of S W 5700 , S W 5710 , and S W 5720  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    S W 5750 - Individuals and Families Field Practicum and Seminar II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The field practicum consists of an agency experience that offers opportunities for advanced practice with children, adults, and families. Students will demonstrate advanced skills in assessment, intervention, and practice with children and adults using an ecological-systems and strengths-based perspective. The seminar will provide an opportunity for students to examine their practice and the influences of theory and policy on practice. Students will complete 240 hours in the practicum.
    Prerequisites: successful completion of S W 5700 , S W 5710 , and S W 5720 .
  •  

    S W 5810 - Advanced Community Social Work Practice (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This advanced course focuses on the social work principles of empowerment and social change as they apply to communities. Students will develop advanced knowledge of the skills and strategies needed to engage effectively in community organizing, development and planning. Consistent with social work’s focus on oppressed and disenfranchised populations, students will explore the concept of diversity, including race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Students will also gain advanced skills in the use of community-based participatory research and an understanding of the use of media and social media in community practice.
    Prerequisites: Successful completion of the MSW foundation curriculum (S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , S W 5040 , S W 5200 , S W 5210 , S W 5220 , S W 5230 , and S W 5240 ) or permission of the MSW Program Director.
  •  

    S W 5825 - Leadership in Health and Human Service Organizations (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides students with advanced knowledge and skills to become effective leaders within nonprofit, public and private health and human service organizations in the 21st century. Students will have the opportunity to learn about a variety of management topics including identification and assessment of key leadership skills and roles, community collaboration and engagement, needs assessment, strategic planning, personnel and Board management, and incorporation of a social justice framework based on organizational and social work ethics.
    Prerequisites: Successful completion of the MSW foundation curriculum (S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , S W 5040 , S W 5200 , S W 5210 , S W 5220 , S W 5230 , and S W 5240 ) or permission of the MSW Program Director.
  •  

    S W 5830 - Community and Organizational Practice Field Practicum and Seminar I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The field practicum consists of an agency/organization experience that offers opportunities relative to community and organizational practice. Building on the skills and knowledge learned in the MSW foundation year, students will demonstrate advanced skills in working in the areas of community practice, nonprofit and public administration, and organizational management. The seminar will provide an opportunity for students to examine their practice and the influences of theory and policies on practice. Students will complete 240 hours in the practicum.
    Prerequisites: Successful completion of the MSW foundation curriculum (S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , S W 5040 , S W 5200 , S W 5210 , S W 5220 , S W 5230 , and S W 5240 ).
  •  

    S W 5845 - Advanced Advocacy Practice (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides an in-depth examination of social welfare advocacy, including exploration of policy and grant writing advocacy skill implementation. Students will engage in applied policy practice activity and will develop a comprehensive understanding of the impact of policies and grants on varied client populations.
    Prerequisites: Successful completion of the MSW foundation curriculum (S W 5005 , S W 5010 , S W 5020 , S W 5030 , S W 5040 , S W 5200 , S W 5210 , S W 5220 , S W 5230 , and S W 5240 ) or permission of the MSW Program Director.
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    S W 5855 - Program Development and Evaluation for Health and Human Services (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This advanced course in the Community and Organizational Practice concentration provides an in-depth examination of theories of community, management skills, and organizational theories. Students will gain skills in developing and managing organizational culture, facilitating design and development of organizational programs and services, developing implementation plans, and creating and managing program and service outcome evaluation. In addition, students will gain experience in fiscal management and resource development.
    Prerequisites: successful completion of the MSW foundation curriculum (S W 5005 S W 5010 S W 5020 S W 5030 S W 5040 S W 5200 S W 5210 S W 5220 , S W 5230 , and S W 5240 ) or permission of the MSW Program Director.
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    S W 5860 - Community and Organizational Practice Field Practicum and Seminar II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The field practicum consists of an agency/organization experience that offers opportunities relative to community and organizational practice. Building on the skills and knowledge learned in the MSW foundation year, students will demonstrate advanced skills in working in the areas of community practice, nonprofit and public administration, and organizational management. The seminar will provide an opportunity for students to examine their practice and the influences of theory and policies on practice. Students will complete 240 hours in the practicum.
    Prerequisites: Successful completion of S W 5810 , S W 5825 , and S W 5830 .


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