Sep 22, 2019  
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin 
    
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Catalog


Graduate courses at Appalachian are numbered 5000 and above. 5000 is master’s level; 6000 is specialist level; 7000 is doctoral level. Courses numbered below 5000 may not count toward the minimum hours required for a graduate degree or certificate program of study.

Courses for Continued Enrollment

Courses numbered 5989/7989 courses are intended for continued enrollment purposes only and do not count toward the minimum hours required for a graduate degree or certificate program of study. All other courses described in this bulletin (except courses numbered 5989 and 7989) are courses that count as a required or elective course on a program of study for at least one graduate degree.

Cross-listed Courses

Several courses are shared across two or more disciplines or departments, and as such are cross listed under multiple prefixes. Students may only count one version of such a course on a program of study. These cross-listed courses are indicated with a notation in (parentheses) at the end of the course description.

Dual-listed Courses

Selected courses at the 5000 level are dual listed with senior undergraduate (4000-level) courses, meaning that the two courses may be offered in the same room at the same time. Graduate students in these 5000-level courses will have additional requirements specified on the syllabus to ensure a more in-depth study of the course topics. These dual-listed courses are indicated with a notation in [brackets] at the end of the course description. Graduate students may include up to 12 semester hours of dual-listed 5000-level courses on a program of study.

NOTE: When a prerequisite is at the undergraduate level (below the 5000 level), students should consult with the department regarding whether they have the relevant background to succeed in the graduate course.

 

Mathematics

  
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    MAT 5941 - Technology for Teaching Mathematics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The use of current computer and calculator technology in various mathematics content areas will be studied. Technology use in these areas will involve problem solving, exploring patterns, experimentation, conjecturing and generalization of findings. Appropriate use of technology will be stressed.
    Prerequisite: undergraduate major in mathematics, or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    MAT 5952 - Problem Solving (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Problem solving is the focus of this course. There is an emphasis on building new mathematical knowledge through work with problems and applying a wide variety of strategies to solve problems and adapt the strategies to new situations. Problems may be drawn from algebra, geometry, number theory, calculus, probability and statistics.
    Prerequisites: knowledge in all the areas from which the problems will be drawn.
  
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    MAT 5961 - Foundations of Geometry (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    A treatment of projective geometry including both the synthetic and the analytic approach. Also to be considered is a study of the relation of Euclidean, affine and hyperbolic geometries to projective geometry.
    Prerequisites: MAT 2240 (Linear Algebra) and MAT 3610 (Geometry).
  
  •  

    MAT 5965 - Informal Geometry (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is an informal treatment of the geometric concepts in the elementary and middle school mathematics curriculum. The topics considered include polygons, congruence, similarity, tilings, transformations, symmetry, angles, constructions, area, perimeter, circles, and polyhedra. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3910. Introduction to the Logic and Structure of Mathematics I or MAT 3920. Introduction to the Logic and Structure of Mathematics II or permission of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with MAT 4910.]
  
  •  

    MAT 5970 - Number Theory Concepts (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    Designed primarily for secondary teachers, this course is a study of the traditional number theory concepts and theorems with special attention to those of significance to the high school curriculum. Emphasis will be on the historical as well as the theoretical development of the subject.
    Prerequisites: undergraduate major in mathematics or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    MAT 5971 - Number Systems and Algebra for Middle Grades Teachers (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Designed primarily for teachers of mathematics at Grades 6-8, this course is a deep and connected study of number and operations, and of algebra, including rational numbers, proportional reasoning, and linear relations. Emphasis will be on rich tasks using representational tools and models to explore mathematical relationships. Problem solving, reasoning and proof, and mathematical communication will also be emphasized. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: enrollment in the Master of Arts in Middle Grades Education program, or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    MAT 5972 - Geometry and Measurement for Middle Grades Teachers (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Designed primarily for teachers of mathematics at Grades 6-8, this course is a deep and connected study of geometry and measurement, including the van Hiele model of geometric learning; shape, size, and symmetry; perimeter, area, surface area, and volume; classical and transformational geometry; the golden ratio, tessellations, and spherical geometry. Emphasis will be on rich tasks using representational tools and models to explore mathematical relationships. Problem solving, reasoning and proof, and mathematical communication will also be emphasized. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: enrollment in the Master of Arts in Middle Grades Education program, or permission of the instructor.
  
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    MAT 5973 - Data Analysis and Probability for Middle Grades Teachers (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Designed primarily for teachers of mathematics at Grades 6-8, this course is a deep and connected study of data analysis and probability, including data collection, organization, and display; measures of spread and center; inferences and predictions based on data; and basic concepts of probability. Emphasis will be on rich tasks using representational tools and models to explore mathematical relationships. Problem solving, reasoning and proof, and mathematical communication will also be emphasized. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: enrollment in the Master of Arts in Middle Grades Education program, or permission of the instructor.
  
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    MAT 5980 - Special Topics in Mathematics Education (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A flexible program of reading, study, planning, and writing designed to meet the needs of individual teachers or groups of teachers in the field of secondary school mathematics.
    Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in mathematics and recommendation of graduate advisor. May be taken up to a total of fifteen semester hours.
  
  •  

    MAT 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. MAT 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  
  •  

    MAT 5999 - Thesis (1-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.

Music

  
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    MUS 5006 - Philosophy of Music (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An investigation of the major philosophies of music in both historical and contemporary perspective. Particular emphasis is placed on aesthetic theory. The relationship between aesthetics of music educational methodology will be examined.
  
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    MUS 5007 - Music Bibliography (2)


    When Offered: Fall
    An introduction to bibliographical research in music, with emphasis on the application of theoretical concepts to practical problems of historical scholarship. Both traditional research processes and newer technologies for accessing scholarly communication are covered.
  
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    MUS 5008 - Research in Music Education (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The organization and reporting of research in music education, including classroom/performance field-based data collection and analysis, is studied.
    Prerequisite: MUS 5007 .
  
  •  

    MUS 5013 - History of Musical Style (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the tendencies of musical style within the major periods of western music history, with emphasis placed on the development of important genres. Consideration is given to geographic location and the social, political, and general cultural history of the time. The styles of representative composers are studied and comparisons are drawn between the arts and across stylistic periods.
  
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    MUS 5018 - Applied Area Literature (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A comprehensive, historical survey of music for the major instrument, with a detailed study of at least one selected solo work representative of the style of each music period. Attention will also be directed to representative ensemble literature and the compilation of a discography and bibliography. May be repeated for a total credit of six semester hours.
  
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    MUS 5020 - Choral/Vocal Techniques (4)


    When Offered: Summer Session. Alternate years
    Designed for those who are preparing to become quality teachers of choral/vocal music in grades K-12. Emphasis on the technique of vocal production and its role in the development of choral ensemble performance practices. Examination of the philosophy and pedagogical concepts and techniques leading to an exemplary choral/vocal program.
  
  •  

    MUS 5021 - Instrumental Techniques (4)


    When Offered: Summer Session. Alternate years
    Designed for those who are preparing to become quality teachers of instrumental music in grades K-12. Emphasis on the philosophy, pedagogical concepts, and techniques leading to the development of an exemplary instrumental music program.
  
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    MUS 5022 - Applied Area Pedagogy (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Pedagogical techniques related to the fundamental principles in the major performance area. Emphasis will be placed on historical development, an examination and evaluation of basic concepts, a consideration of style and technique, and research into the various pedagogical approaches to functional efficiency.
  
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    MUS 5023 - Choral Masterworks (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session. Alternate years
    A study of representative choral masterworks from the Renaissance to the present. This course is intended for the advanced choral student who has a background in choral conducting.
    Prerequisites: MUS 3020 (Conducting), MUS 3022 (Choral Conducting Practicum) and MUS 3032 (Choral Techniques and Literature) or equivalent.
  
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    MUS 5024 - Concert Band Literature (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session. Alternate years
    A comprehensive study of the literature for winds and percussion. Analysis, score study, and aural recognition of representative compositions.
  
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    MUS 5030 - Advanced Conducting (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session. Alternate years
    The critical examination of choral and instrumental scores with emphasis on score analysis, interpretative decision making, and advanced conducting technique.
  
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    MUS 5035 - Clinical Experience in Music (1)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    An intensive clinical experience in music. Students will join respected professionals in instrumental or choral/vocal conducting in seminar, rehearsal and performance experiences.
  
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    MUS 5040 - Current Trends and Critical Issues in Music Education (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session. Alternate years
    An examination of current trends, pedagogical practices, and critical issues in music education.
  
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    MUS 5041 - The Comprehensive Music Curriculum (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session. Alternate years
    An examination of the philosophy, components, and methodologies of the comprehensive music curriculum.
  
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    MUS 5050 - Supervision and Collegiate Teaching in Music Therapy (2)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Exploration of issues in undergraduate preparation of music therapists.
    Prerequisite: MUS 4901 (Internship in Music Therapy) or equivalent. Students must be enrolled concurrently in MUS 5200 - Music Therapy Laboratory (0) .
  
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    MUS 5051 - Advanced Topics in Music Therapy (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Investigation and examination of current trends, especially those related to advanced clinical practice in music therapy, including client assessment through music experiences and innovative treatment methods.
    Prerequisite: MUS 4901 (Internship in Music Therapy) or equivalent. Students must be enrolled concurrently in MUS 5200 - Music Therapy Laboratory (0) .
  
  •  

    MUS 5060 - Bonny Method of GIM (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    Through lectures, demonstrations, and supervised experiences as guide and traveler, this training will develop knowledge and skill in the use of the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music (GIM) as a method of self-exploration and a psychotherapeutic process.
    Prerequisite: a GIM personal session. This course may be repeated with permission of the program director for up to 9 hours of credit towards the MMT.
    (Note: MUS 5060 requires participation in a 5-day intensive workshop that is conducted off-campus between academic terms and requires payment of workshop fees in addition to tuition.)
  
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    MUS 5061 - Advanced Clinical Improvisation (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Theory and practice of advanced techniques for clinical music improvisation.
    Prerequisite: MUS 4060 (Clinical Piano Improvisation) or equivalent. Students must be enrolled concurrently in MUS 5200 - Music Therapy Laboratory (0) .
  
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    MUS 5070 - Technology for Music Educators (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    A survey of contemporary technology used to compose, arrange, perform, record, and digitally distribute music. Students will gain practical knowledge of the concepts necessary to integrate technology into the general music classroom as well as choral and instrumental rehearsal halls.
  
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    MUS 5071 - Orff Schulwerk Level I (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    Based on the ideas and teachings of Carl Orff, Level I Orff-Schulwerk coursework provides a means of experiencing and understanding the philosophy and process of this approach to teaching music. Emphasis is placed on cultivation of an understanding of the Orff-Schulwerk philosophy, enhancement of creative and compositional skills, development of music pedagogy and instructional skills appropriate for use with diverse student populations, and creation of a classroom environment facilitating success of all students.
  
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    MUS 5072 - Orchestral Literature (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    A comprehensive study of the literature for orchestra. Analysis, score study, and aural recognition of representative compositions.
  
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    MUS 5100 - Performance Ensemble (1)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Students will assume leadership roles as set forth by the ensemble director, including activities such as directing sectional rehearsals, preparing program notes and assisting with individual instruction.
  
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    MUS 5101 - Second Performance Ensemble (1)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Designed for graduate students who are taking a second performance ensemble within a given semester. Students will assume leadership roles as set forth by the ensemble director, including activities such as directing sectional rehearsals, preparing program notes and assisting with individual instruction.
  
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    MUS 5160 - Conducting Seminar (1)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    The Conducting Seminar is a weekly opportunity for the graduate conducting students to share the recordings of their rehearsals, share ideas for improvement, and learn from each other and from the instructor. Students will also present several masterworks in seminar, sharing their approaches to score marking, preparation, study, and analysis. These works may later be performed by the graduate students within various ensembles as deemed appropriate by the faculty. May be repeated for a total credit of four semester hours.
  
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    MUS 5170 - Professional and Scholarly Practices for Musicians (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Students will be introduced to a variety of skills essential for the performing musician, including introduction to research methods and resources, communication in the lecture-recital/lecture-demonstration format to equip students with the skills of adapting research findings into clear, concise, and comprehensible formats, and entrepreneurship.
  
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    MUS 5200 - Music Therapy Laboratory (0)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Music improvisation-based laboratory designed to provide direct experiences as a participant in a music therapy group.
    Prerequisite: Bachelor’s degree in Music Therapy, or 5 s.h. of MUS 3900 (Music Therapy Practicum). Required of all music therapy graduate students.
  
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    MUS 5500 - Independent Study in Music (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    MUS 5525 - Product of Learning (2)


    When Offered: Spring
  
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    MUS 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Variable content which may be repeated for credit. Topics will include special areas of music theory, music literature and music education.
  
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    MUS 5600 - Analytical Techniques (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The development of techniques for analysis of music from the Baroque through the Romantic period through counterpoint, melodic structure, harmony, and form.
    Permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with MUS 4600.]
  
  •  

    MUS 5602 - Music Theory Pedagogy (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    A study of teaching techniques and current research in the field of music theory pedagogy. Students will review current texts, software, and teaching styles. Students will design and implement new pedagogical approaches through teaching demonstrations and curriculum development.
    Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with MUS 4602.]
  
  •  

    MUS 5900 - Advanced Music Therapy Practicum (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    In-depth clinical experience designed to broaden clinical skills or provide opportunity for application of advanced music therapy methods.
    Prerequisite: MUS 4901 (Internship in Music Therapy) or equivalent. Students must be enrolled concurrently in MUS 5200 - Music Therapy Laboratory (0) .
  
  •  

    MUS 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  
  •  

    MUS 5995 - Clinical Paper in Music Therapy (1)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Implementation and scholarly documentation of supervised, advanced clinical work.
  
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    MUS 5996 - Creative Project in Music Therapy (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Execution and scholarly documentation of a research based clinical project.
  
  •  

    MUS 5997 - Practicum Experience (2)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A field-oriented course involving supervised implementation of the pedagogical techniques developed during the course of study.
  
  •  

    MUS 5998 - Master of Music in Performance Recital (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    MUS 5999 - Thesis (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring

Nursing

  
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    NUR 5040 - Theories for Advanced Nursing Practice (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to integrate theories from behavioral, social, applied, and nursing science to both individual patients for whom they directly care and to those individuals for whom they are indirectly responsible. Holistic concepts of human beings, health, nursing, and environment provide the foundation for comparing nursing theories. Exploration of theoretical frameworks relevant to nursing provides student knowledge to develop specific care concepts pertinent to cultural diversity, health promotion, and comprehensive practice. Special emphasis is on the integration and application of theory into advanced nursing practice.
    Prerequisite: Admission to MSN program.
  
  •  

    NUR 5050 - Educational Theories for Nursing Academic and Practice Settings (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course explores foundational knowledge required for the application of educational theories for the nursing profession. Major research based theories of adult learning, health communication, health literacy, simulation and technology, and knowledge development in nursing will be investigated. Students will assess the implications of these theories in academic and practice settings.
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: NUR 5040  
  
  •  

    NUR 5070 - Contemporary Issues in Nursing (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Summer Session
    This course enables students to analyze contemporary issues in nursing; including concepts related to quality improvement, patient safety, global health, rural health, healthcare policy, organization, technology in nursing, and financing, the global healthcare environment and perspectives, informatics, health disparities, and interprofessional practice. An emphasis will be placed on a systematic approach to the economic, legal and political factors that influence health care.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MSN program.
  
  •  

    NUR 5150 - Advanced Health Assessment for Adults (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course prepares the student to perform advanced health assessment of adults building on the student’s basic knowledge and skill acquired in undergraduate coursework. Emphasis is placed on the following: analysis of assessment findings to determine leading health needs for well individuals and those with health variances, health risk factor analysis, interprofessional collaboration, health promotion, health literacy, global health, rural health, and clinical decision making. Proficiency in performing a culturally sensitive, holistic, comprehensive health assessment and physical examination is expected upon course completion.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MSN program.
  
  •  

    NUR 5200 - Pathophysiology for Advanced Nursing (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course builds upon the students’ preparation of biological and physical sciences in the management of health promotion and wellness, disease prevention, and disease management of culturally diverse individuals. Emphasis is placed upon physiology and pathophysiological concepts in an effort to strengthen students’ scientific background and facilitate understanding of nursing and the etiology of physiological disruptions. Upon successful completion of this course the student will integrate broad, organizational, patient-centered and culturally competent concepts to pathophysiological understanding in the safe delivery, management, and evaluation of evidenced-based nursing clinical prevention and population care and services to individuals and their families.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MSN program.
  
  •  

    NUR 5250 - Nursing Research for Evidence-Based Practice (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to bring evidence-based practice to both individual patients for whom they directly care and to those individuals for whom they are indirectly responsible. Those skills include knowledge acquisition and dissemination, working in groups, and the application and utilization of research related to global and rural health problems and advanced practice nursing.
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: NUR 5040  
  
  •  

    NUR 5600 - Research Project (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer Session
    Implementation of an approved research proposal: collection and analysis of data, preparation of report and presentation of the project. May be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours.
    Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy.
  
  •  

    NUR 5715 - Instructional Strategies for Nursing and Informatics (3)


    When Offered: Spring, Summer Session
    This course builds on the educational theories by developing classroom and clinical instructional strategies. Advanced technological knowledge and skills such as use of simulation are emphasized to enhance student learning in numerous settings. The course will include examination of a variety of instructional strategies for creating positive learning environments and evaluating pedagogical strategies. Emphasis is placed on the development and use of creative, interactive strategies and technology supported strategies that challenge and engage the learner.
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: NUR 5810  
  
  •  

    NUR 5800 - Advanced Pharmacology for Nursing (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    This course presents advanced pharmacological concepts as a foundation for theory and practicum courses. Related concepts of critical thinking, evidence-based practice, health literacy, rural and global health, interdisciplinary communication, legal and ethical parameters of practice, and care integration are applied through case study analysis, class discussions, and written assignments.
    Prerequisite: Admission to MSN program.
  
  •  

    NUR 5810 - Educational Tests and Measurement in Nursing (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to provide nurse educators with the necessary knowledge and skills to measure and evaluate learning outcomes in a variety of settings. Audiences may include nursing students, patients, or other nursing personnel. The concepts of testing, measurement, and evaluation are studied from a nursing perspective. Social, ethical, and legal issues associated with testing and measurement are explored along with continuous quality improvement for program evaluation.
    Prerequisites: NUR 5040 , NUR 5050 , NUR 5250  
  
  •  

    NUR 5820 - Nursing Program Development and Evaluation (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the ongoing process of development and evaluation of nursing curricula. The teaching, learning, and evaluation processes are examined from the standpoint of education and nursing research and the effect on various curriculum patterns with emphasis placed on the context-relevant curriculum. The course provides opportunities for examination of factors that influence curriculum development, implementation, and evaluation, as well as consideration of the integration of rural and global health concepts and use of technological strategies.
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: NUR 5050  
  
  •  

    NUR 5900 - Nursing Education Practicum (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Summer Session
    This course provides nurse educators with 120 hours of practical experiences in a teaching role. Students, under the guidance of a mentor/preceptor, design educational offerings based on identified learning outcomes. Best practices regarding instruction and evaluation for culturally diverse audiences are examined.
    Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  
  •  

    NUR 5901 - Advanced Clinical Practicum (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    This course represents a clinical learning experience with a preceptor in which the learner will have the opportunity to synthesize and integrate didactic learning, promote innovative thinking, and test new potential solutions to clinical /practice or system issues. The learner will also have opportunity to master patient care delivery skills as well as system assessment and intervention skills which require an understanding of organizational dynamics. Students will focus on a population of interest and a specific role. The course has both an adult health component and a health promotion component. Clinical conferences will be conducted online using discussion forums.
    Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.
  
  •  

    NUR 5999 - Thesis (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer Session
    Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy.

Nutrition

  
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    NUT 5000 - Research Methods in Nutrition and Foods (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Examination of research methodologies in nutritional sciences and food systems, familiarization with the relevant research literature, utilization of statistical techniques, collection and interpretation of data, and preparation of reports. Research proposals will be prepared.
    Prerequisite: a 3 s.h. graduate statistics course at the level of E S 5592 - Data Analysis in Sport and Exercise Science (3) .
  
  •  

    NUT 5205 - Maternal and Child Nutrition (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An in-depth study of nutritional needs and problems from conception through adolescence, both nationally and internationally. An examination of current trends in dietary intake, nutrition education during pregnancy and childhood, and the role of nutrition in child development.
    Prerequisite: NUT 2202 (Nutrition and Health) or equivalent.
  
  •  

    NUT 5210 - Nutrition for Older Adults (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An overview of the physiology, nutritional needs and nutritional status of older adults and the interaction of nutrition, disease and medication.
    Prerequisite: graduate level status
    Lecture three hours
  
  •  

    NUT 5220 - Advanced Concepts in Nutrition and Assessment (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the techniques used to measure and evaluate the nutritional status of individuals and populations. Development of the techniques and skills to initiate and maintain dietary changes.
    Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.
  
  •  

    NUT 5250 - Dietetic Practice I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A seminar class designed for students enrolled in the AP4 program (pre-professional practice program) to enhance and supplement supervised practice learning activities. Ethical issues and professional standards will be discussed. Instructors and guest speakers will present and discuss current research relevant to health care in the clinical setting including: nutrition assessment, nutrition education, health promotion, medical nutrition therapies, and interrelationships of clinical care to other systems. Students will be responsible for case presentations and discussion.
  
  •  

    NUT 5255 - Dietetic Practice II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A seminar class designed for students enrolled in the AP4 program (pre-professional practice program) to enhance and supplement supervised practice learning activities. Faculty and guest lecturers will present and discuss current research relevant to: the health care delivery system, administrative issues including foodservice delivery systems, quality management, nutrition care and education in community settings, and the legislative process. Students will be responsible for case presentations and discussion.
  
  •  

    NUT 5300 - Effective Rural Practice for Health Professionals (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Survey of rural health issues in the United States; simulated practice scenarios involving rural health settings; development of transferable cultural competence skills for successful rural health practice.
    [Dual-listed with NUT 4300.]
  
  •  

    NUT 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graduate students may broaden or intensify their program through individual research and involvement in a given area of nutrition.
  
  •  

    NUT 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An opportunity to study a special topic or combination of topics not otherwise provided for the nutrition curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
  
  •  

    NUT 5552 - Medical Terminology/Records (1)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to develop an understanding of the medical terminology and vocabulary utilized in medical records and health professions.
    Lecture one hour.
  
  •  

    NUT 5555 - Advanced Nutritional Aspects of Exercise and Sports (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of nutrition specific to physical activity and sport performance. The course utilizes reading, presentation, and discussion of published research on carbohydrate, protein, and fat consumption, digestion, and metabolism to demonstrate the importance of diet in exercise performance. A special concentration on ergogenic aids is provided.
    (Same as E S 5555 .)
  
  •  

    NUT 5900 - Internship (3-12)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A structured field experience supervised by department faculty. A proposal is to be submitted to the graduate committee and be approved for participation the semester previous to beginning the experience. No credit will be given for experience not previously approved.
    Prerequisite: 15 s.h. of graduate courses toward degree program and approved proposal.
  
  •  

    NUT 5901 - Research Project (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Implementation of an approved research proposal: collection and analysis of data, preparation of report(s) and presentation of project. NUT 5901 may be repeated for a total credit of four semester hours.
    Prerequisite: NUT 5000  and proficiency in statistics.
  
  •  

    NUT 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s level. NUT 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  
  •  

    NUT 5999 - Thesis (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring

Philosophy

  
  •  

    PHL 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    PHL 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    PHL 5649 - Seminar (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An intensive study of special problems, topics, or issues related to the study of philosophy. The subject matter of this course will vary and barring duplication of subject matter, a student may repeat the course for credit.
    Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or consent of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with PHL 4549.]
  
  •  

    PHL 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. PHL 5989 does not count toward a degree.

Physics

  
  •  

    PHY 5011 - Applied Physics Colloquium (0)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to introduce students to a wide variety of physics research and research in other disciplines by attending colloquia on campus. All graduate students are expected to attend all departmental and other designated colloquia. Students must enroll at least two times.
  
  •  

    PHY 5020 - Computational Methods in Physics and Engineering (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A course designed to introduce the student to modern techniques and algorithms in computational physics, involving solutions of real physical systems using techniques from interpolation, optimization, non-linear least squares, the numerical integration of ordinary and partial differential equations, Monte Carlo methods, Fourier analysis and stability analysis. Applications of these techniques will be selected from the areas of mechanics, optics, modern physics, astrophysics, engineering, signal processing, and electromagnetism. Graduate students will, in addition to the lab, carry out a major computational project which will address an important or relevant problem in physics, astrophysics or engineering. Programming will be carried out in a computer language such as ‘C’ or Fortran.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. [Dual-listed with PHY 4020.]
  
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    PHY 5330 - Digital Electronics (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides an introduction to digital electronics, with an emphasis on the study of components that are building blocks for digital devices and equipment, especially microcomputers. Emphasis will be placed on the design of combinatorial, sequential, and state machine (ASM) circuits, including simplification by Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, and computer-aided tools. Hardware description languages will be used to implement designs on programmable logic devices (PLD). Topics to be covered include: number systems, Boolean algebra, logic families, gates, flip-flops, medium scale integration devices, combinatorial and sequential circuits, ASM, PLD, arithmetic logic units, memory, input-output, D/A, A/D, and a generic CPU. The industry-oriented, hands-on labs involve circuit construction, testing and trouble-shooting using modern test equipment.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with PHY 4330.]
  
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    PHY 5400 - Professional Skills (1)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to help students develop important professional skills such as leadership, networking, interview skills, self- promotion, resume writing, and cover letter writing, all geared toward the field of engineering physics. Students will complete assignments related to these skills and are expected to attend all guest lectures designed to help students with professional skills. Students should enroll in one of their last two semesters of study.
    Prerequisites: Open to students admitted to the Engineering Physics graduate program or with permission of the instructor.
  
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    PHY 5405 - Graduate Seminar (1)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to help students incorporate the skills of effective communication in Engineering Physics. Students will be required to present their research or internship experience in writing and through oral presentations. Students should enroll in one of their last two semesters of study after completing research or an internship.
    Prerequisites: Open to students admitted to the engineering physics graduate program or with permission of the instructor.
  
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    PHY 5430 - Digital Systems (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    Design and implementation of digital systems. This applications-oriented course covers designing digital systems and using hardware description languages such as VHDL to implement them with complex programmable logic devices (CPLD) or field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). Topics covered include CPLD and FPGA architectures, real-world digital design difficulties (timing, noise, etc.), the design and implementation of combinatorial, sequential, and SSI / MSI / LSI circuits, algorithmic state machines, and simple CPUs.
    Prerequisite: PHY 4330/PHY 5330  or the equivalent.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours
  
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    PHY 5435 - Laboratory Automation (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    A rigorous applications-oriented course designed to foster an in-depth understanding of both the hardware and software aspects of laboratory automation. Personal computers are used to control laboratory instruments, collect and analyze data, and plot results. Topics covered include the use of data acquisition and control cards, serial and IEEE-488 interfacing, and coordinated data collection and control. State-of-the-art data acquisition languages are used extensively in the laboratory.
    Prerequisite: PHY 5330  and either PHY 5020  or PHY 5735 .
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours
  
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    PHY 5440 - Modern Instrumentation Design (4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of the role of microprocessors and microcontrollers in modern instrumentation. Students will utilize hardware/software real time development systems in the design and construction of basic instruments.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours
  
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    PHY 5450 - Programmable Logic Controllers (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides an introduction to the Allen-Bradley CompactLogix Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), industrial hardware components, and a variety programming languages including Ladder Logic, Structured Text and Sequential Function Chart. Students will complete laboratory exercises that simulate real-world industrial process-control and automation. PLC networking, Human-Machine Interface (HMI) design and control/feedback circuitry will also be explored.
    Corequisite: PHY 4330/5330
  
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    PHY 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    PHY 5520 - Data Transmission and Signal Processing (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of local area networks, broad band and base band transmission, optical fiber transmission, analog signal analysis and filtering, and discrete signal processing.
    Prerequisites: PHY 5620 , PHY 5440  or equivalent.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours.
  
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    PHY 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An intensive study of a single topic in physics.
  
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    PHY 5550 - Directed Research in Applied Physics (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An original research project will be chosen, formulated and executed by the student under the guidance of a faculty member. Individual faculty will determine assessment tailored to the student’s particular research project.
  
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    PHY 5620 - Optics (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A rigorous introduction to geometric and wave optics with applications including lasers, interferometers, spectroscopy, telescopes, fiber optics, and remote sensing. Basic electromagnetic wave theory is employed to describe the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter including absorption, dispersion, reflection, and scattering. Geometric optics is employed to study image formation by optical systems using both ray-tracing and matrix optics methods. Wave optics is used to study interference, diffraction, and coherence. This leads into a detailed lab-based unit dealing with interferometry and optical system alignment, with applications to optical component testing, spectral analysis of light sources, and coherence. The course also includes a semester synthesis project.
    Prerequisite: PHY 3001. Analytical Methods in Physics or equivalent (with a grade of “C” or higher) or permission of instructor.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours [Dual-listed with PHY 4620.]
  
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    PHY 5635 - LabVIEW Interfacing and Robotics (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    An applications-oriented course designed to create programs written in the LabVIEW language for hardware interfacing. Data acquisition and control hardware is used to collect data from sensors and instruments which is then analyzed and displayed using LabVIEW. The hardware is also used to control devices such as motors and a five-axis robotic arm. Other topics covered include rotary encoders, state machines, and PID control. The topics covered will prepare students to take the National Instruments CLAD certification exam.
    Prerequisite: PHY 5020  or PHY 5735  or PHY 5740 .
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours
  
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    PHY 5730 - Analog Systems (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    The theory and operation of DC and AC circuits with discrete passive and active components. Included are resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, and operational amplifiers. An in- depth analysis of circuit theorems, phasors, differential equations, and simulations predicting the behavior of systems of analog devices will be explored in lecture and laboratory. The use and limitations of common electronics instrumentation such as multimeters, oscilloscopes, and function generators will also be explored.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours [Dual-listed with PHY 4730.]
  
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    PHY 5735 - Microcontrollers (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    An in-depth study of the architecture, programming and interfacing of microcontrollers. Topics to be covered include: introduction to microcontrollers, architectures, internal hardware (such as timers, serial ports, A/Ds, D/As, I2C), instruction sets, assembly language programming, interrupt-driven code, and interfacing. Both stand-alone microcontrollers and single board computers will be used in lab. Most labs will involve interfacing microcontrollers to devices such as switches, LEDs, keypads, 7-segment displays, LCD displays, motors, sensors, etc. Microcontroller simulators and in-circuit-emulators (ICE) will be used for debugging.
    Prerequisite: PHY 5330  or the equivalent
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours
  
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    PHY 5740 - Sensors and Transducers (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    This applications-oriented course covers the integration of transducers into sensor-based systems. Students will integrate transducers with signal conditioning circuitry and will develop proficiency in interfacing the conditioned signals with data acquisition hardware, using programs such as the National Instruments LabVIEW software program. Sensors covered include, but are not limited to, temperature, pressure, optical, and humidity.
    Prerequisite: PHY 5730  or equivalent
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
 

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