Oct 23, 2019  
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin 
    
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Catalog


Graduate courses at Appalachian are numbered 5000 and above. 5000 is master’s level; 6000 is specialist level; 7000 is doctoral level. Courses numbered below 5000 may not count toward the minimum hours required for a graduate degree or certificate program of study.

Courses for Continued Enrollment

Courses numbered 5989/7989 courses are intended for continued enrollment purposes only and do not count toward the minimum hours required for a graduate degree or certificate program of study. All other courses described in this bulletin (except courses numbered 5989 and 7989) are courses that count as a required or elective course on a program of study for at least one graduate degree.

Cross-listed Courses

Several courses are shared across two or more disciplines or departments, and as such are cross listed under multiple prefixes. Students may only count one version of such a course on a program of study. These cross-listed courses are indicated with a notation in (parentheses) at the end of the course description.

Dual-listed Courses

Selected courses at the 5000 level are dual listed with senior undergraduate (4000-level) courses, meaning that the two courses may be offered in the same room at the same time. Graduate students in these 5000-level courses will have additional requirements specified on the syllabus to ensure a more in-depth study of the course topics. These dual-listed courses are indicated with a notation in [brackets] at the end of the course description. Graduate students may include up to 12 semester hours of dual-listed 5000-level courses on a program of study.

NOTE: When a prerequisite is at the undergraduate level (below the 5000 level), students should consult with the department regarding whether they have the relevant background to succeed in the graduate course.

 

Curriculum & Instruction

Additional offerings by the Department of Curriculum and Instruction include courses in Business Education (BE) and Career and Technical Education (CTE)

  
  •  

    C I 5850 - Middle Level Curriculum (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course examines models of curriculum and processes of curriculum design that are responsive to the needs of young adolescents. Educators examine major middle level curriculum theories, historical contexts of curriculum development, traditional and innovative middle level curriculum models, implications of 21st Century teaching and learning, and trends and issues that reflect research and successful practice.
  
  •  

    C I 5860 - Audio Documentary Production (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    In this course, students listen to and analyze a variety of non-fiction audio programs in terms of both form and content. Emphasis is placed on understanding the wide range of purposes for which non-fiction programs are made, and on examining the variety of techniques used to achieve those purposes. The class will explore the advantages and disadvantages of creating and distributing documentaries in an audio format. Students also engage in some hands-on experiences creating sound documentaries using a variety of digital audio hardware and software. The short audio documentaries produced by each member of the class will be podcast.
  
  •  

    C I 5880 - Educational Regulations and Policies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines key issues that govern daily and long-range decisions of educational leaders. The course focuses on understanding North Carolina and federal codes, policies, and significant precedent and will emphasize analysis of concepts such as finance, personnel, risk management, curriculum, student services, teacher rights, torts, student rights, and access.
  
  •  

    C I 5900 - Internship/Practicum (1-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Provides direct experiences teaching in grades Kindergarten through nine. Students are required to spend 90 hours teaching in classrooms appropriate to the level(s) of licensure sought. This internship/practicum is designed only for those without appropriate experience in their Master of Arts major, as determined by the students’ academic advisory committees.
  
  •  

    C I 5910 - Applied Curriculum Specialist Skills (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course offers site-based experiences of leadership and management for prospective curriculum specialists. Students will be placed with competent administrative/supervisory personnel and will observe, participate in, and evaluate curriculum issues existing in public schools, public school systems, or other appropriate agencies along with attending class to explore issues and applications of curriculum specialist standards.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  
  •  

    C I 5921 - Instructional Design (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Analysis and application of systematic strategies for the identification of instructional needs, design of instructional system models to meet educational goals in both K-12 education and business, and evaluation of instructional systems.
  
  •  

    C I 5922 - Number Systems and Operations: K-5 Mathematical Tasks (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Analysis and construction of effective mathematical tasks in teaching number systems and operations at the K-5 level; attention is also given to the expansion of content knowledge.
  
  •  

    C I 5923 - Geometry & Spatial Visualization: K-5 Assessment (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Formative and summative assessment strategies of students’ geometric thinking in elementary grades; concept development of 2- and 3-dimensional geometry. Attention also given to diagnosis of student errors. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: C I 5922 .
  
  •  

    C I 5924 - Algebraic Reasoning: K-5 Discourse & Questioning (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Focus on the early algebra concepts of functional thinking and generalized arithmetic in relationship to pedagogical practices centered on questioning in the mathematics classroom. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: C I 5922 .
  
  •  

    C I 5925 - Data Analysis and Measurement: K-5 Classroom Interactions (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Focus on statistical literacy of elementary teachers and the teaching of data analysis and measurement to K-5 students; attention is also given to learning methods which facilitate appropriate classroom interactions. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: C I 5922 .
  
  •  

    C I 5926 - Rational Numbers and Operations: K-5 Learning Trajectories (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Focus on rational number concepts through learning trajectories at the K-5 level; attention also given to problem solving and content knowledge.
    Prerequisite: C I 5922 .
  
  •  

    C I 5927 - Mathematical Modeling: K-5 Leadership (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Generating mathematical representations and making explicit connections between concepts. Pedagogy designed to equip elementary teachers to become mathematics teacher-leaders in school settings; focus given to topics integrated within mathematical strands.
    Prerequisites: C I 5922 , C I 5923 /MAT 5923 , C I 5924 /MAT 5924 , C I 5925 /MAT 5925 , and C I 5926 .
  
  •  

    C I 5930 - Instructional Graphics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Examination of basic design principles and concepts in the selection, design, and evaluation of graphic materials. Course includes laboratory experience in design, development, production, and publication of graphical materials. The laboratory experience centers on the use of microcomputers and associated input or output devices.
  
  •  

    C I 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  
  •  

    C I 5999 - Thesis (4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    C I 6050 - Critical Perspectives and Research in New Media and Literacies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will position students as scholarly professionals, leaders, and researchers in the theoretical, critical, aesthetic, and practical dimensions of information communication technologies, emerging literacies, and new media. Students will investigate theory and research across the areas of communication studies, literacy studies, technology education, and sustainability as they relate to new media and emerging technologies. Using qualitative methodologies- specifically arts-based research and visual ethnography- students will examine the artistic/aesthetic, technical, social, cultural, political, economic, and environmental dimensions of media and technology as they develop perspectives on new media, technologies, and literacies that will inform their future research, advocacy, and leadership.
  
  •  

    C I 6160 - Field Study in Curriculum Problems (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Students develop a conceptual framework based on general system theory for guiding, developing, and evaluating school curriculum improvements. Students conduct a research project analyzing the design and development of school curriculum planning with emphasis on current trends and issues in elementary school curriculum (K-9).
  
  •  

    C I 6310 - Analysis of the Teaching Process (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Examination of the teacher-pupil and pupil-pupil interaction in the classroom through study of original relevant research disciplines concerning human behavior and society. Special attention is given to the efforts of teacher approaches to children, the organization of curriculum materials and the structure of the classroom society on the accomplishment of education objectives.
  
  •  

    C I 6360 - Survey of Research and Implications for Curriculum and Instruction (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course emphasizes the reading and interpretation of research on designated topics within the school curriculum. Through collaboration and dialogue among class members, resulting implications for classroom instruction are determined.
  
  •  

    C I 6460 - Issues, Trends, and Problems in Curriculum, K-9 (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Analysis of current practices, problems, and trends in education with emphasis on improved programs.
  
  •  

    C I 6500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    C I 6530-6549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Consideration of group and individual investigations in education.
  
  •  

    C I 6999 - Education Specialist Thesis (1-6)


    When Offered: Fall
  
  •  

    C I 7130 - Investigations into Curriculum and Instruction Problems (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Investigation into curriculum and instruction problems is a course taken during the student’s public school internship. The aim of this course is to provide those who have an intense interest in curriculum and instruction with an opportunity for practical application of knowledge and skills obtained from the research core, along with an opportunity to work with faculty who are researching problems.
  
  •  

    C I 7131 - Emerging Issues in Curriculum and Instruction (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Within the context of educational leadership, the purpose of this course is to provide doctoral level students with an in-depth understanding of issues, problems, and trends in curriculum and instruction at the local, state and national levels. The course is also aimed at providing students with experiences which lead to an understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of problem setting, problem solving, and policy analysis in curriculum and instruction.
  
  •  

    C I 7132 - Reflective Supervision of Curriculum and Instruction (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The focus of this course is on the situation-specific application of knowledge to problems in supervision. The course has two foci. First, the practical problems of supervision as they relate to teaching and implementing the curriculum at the school system, school building, and classroom levels are targeted. The second outcome is the development of a reflective practitioner who understands and approaches supervision in a deliberative manner.
  
  •  

    C I 7989 - Doctoral Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing doctoral research.

Dance

  
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    DAN 5460 - Somatics (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This is a survey course exploring several different approaches to body-centered learning. A broad overview of current conditioning and therapeutic bodywork methods will be introduced and explored. The course will be lecture and experiential in nature.
    [Dual-listed with DAN 4460.]
  
  •  

    DAN 5480 - Pilates Conditioning II (2)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A second level study of the Pilates method, based on the concepts of centering, concentration, control, precision, breath and flow. This course will introduce the equipment and the apparatus developed by Joseph H. Pilates. May be repeated one time for credit.
    Prerequisite: DAN 3480 (Pilates Conditioning I) or permission of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with DAN 4480.]
  
  •  

    DAN 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    DAN 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand

Economics

  
  •  

    ECO 5150 - Business Economics (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Intensive study of economic decision techniques for management. Topics include estimation of demand and cost function, analysis of economic forecasts and business cycles, analysis of price and non-price competition, allocation and distributional effects of regulation, taxation, and fiscal and monetary policy, cost-benefit and cost effectiveness analyses for the not-for-profit sector. Primary emphasis will be placed on the understanding and application, rather than the theoretical and computational aspects, of these techniques.
    Prerequisite: admission to the MBA Program or permission approved by the Assistant Dean for Graduate and International Programs in the Walker College of Business.
  
  •  

    ECO 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    ECO 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    ECO 5621 - Environmental Economics and Policy (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Analysis of the interrelationships among economic activity, government policies, and the environment; the benefits and costs of economic growth; the economics of environmental quality; the social costs of pollution; and the intertemporal allocation of natural resources.
    Prerequisite: ECO 2030 (Principles of Microeconomics) or ECO 2620 (Environmental and Resource Economics).
    [Dual-listed with ECO 4621.]
  
  •  

    ECO 5640 - International Macroeconomics (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course aims to provide a basic knowledge of how international financial markets work. It is a combination of lectures and discussions covering theory and real-world policies, events, and evidence. The course can be broadly divided into three parts - foreign exchange markets, international financial transactions, and economic policies. The first part focuses on exchange rate behavior, foreign exchange rate markets, the determinants of the exchange rates. The second part of the course studies international financial transactions in a global macroeconomy. The goal of the last part of the course is to understand how the choices governments make about monetary and fiscal policies, or about exchange rate regime and capital mobility, affect economic outcomes, and why crises occur.
    Prerequisite: ECO 2040 (Principles of Marcoeconomics).
    [Dual-listed with ECO 4640.]
  
  •  

    ECO 5660 - Benefit-Cost Analysis (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The study of the evaluation of competing public policy alternatives. The purpose of benefit-cost analysis is to inform government decision-making and facilitate the more efficient allocation of scarce resources. This course introduces the basic theory and principles of benefit-cost analysis and examines applications of the methodology.
    Prerequisite: ECO 2030 (Principles of Economics - Price Theory).
    [Dual-listed with ECO 4660].
  
  •  

    ECO 5740 - Forecasting and Time Series Models (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An examination of time series models for purposes of forecasting and performing time series regressions in economics, business, and the social sciences. Topics covered may include ARIMA, VAR, Granger causality, unit roots, spurious regressions, ARCH, and GARCH. Computer software will be utilized in applications.
    Prerequisite: ECO 2200 (Business and Economic Statistics II) or permission of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with ECO 4740.]
  
  •  

    ECO 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.

Educational Leadership

  
  •  

    EDL 7011 - Multi-Disciplinary Seminar on Emerging Issues I (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A multi-disciplinary seminar to examine current and emerging issues in society and their impact on public education. The course draws upon readings from a variety of disciplines for students to examine and to reflectively explore fundamental questions about: the nature and purpose of education; how educators conceive of and understand teaching and learning in schools and classrooms; and how educational leaders conceive of and understand the complex relations between schools, teachers, learners, and curriculum.
  
  •  

    EDL 7012 - Multi-Disciplinary Seminar on Emerging Issues II (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A continuation of EDL 7011 . This seminar will feature different professional disciplines in developing an understanding of the context of public school administration. The seminar will include comprehensive treatments of how leaders use information in shaping and communicating their vision and values throughout organizations. Students will be expected to assume more responsibility for building responses to issues presented in this seminar.
  
  •  

    EDL 7020 - Organizational and Systems Theory (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will integrate essential features of research in organizational theory with the more recent developments in systems theory. How people and groups organize to accomplish tasks will be combined with how organizations combine to form systems. A special feature of the course will be its treatment of organizations and systems for public, non-profit enterprises. Models and case studies will be featured.
  
  •  

    EDL 7025 - Leadership in Organizations (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Brings into coherent form the application of leadership principles to organizations. Leadership is seen as the mechanism for putting both organizational and system theories into action, to enhance school environments, and to sustain structures for change. Extensive use of case studies will be featured.
  
  •  

    EDL 7030 - Concepts and Constructs in Curriculum and Instruction (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Designed to explore and critically examine the structure, concepts, issues and decisions underlying curriculum and instructional thought as practiced in public schools. Instruction will utilize a polyfocal conspectus, study of cases, simulation, and juris prudential experiences. Included in the products used to evaluate student performance are: development of cases, impact statements, literature reviews, and similar projects.
  
  •  

    EDL 7040 - Educational Organizations and Technology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Students in this course will develop strategies for forming and implementing a vision for incorporating computer and communications technologies into educational settings. They will have an opportunity, as current and future educational leaders, to investigate examples of these technologies in schools and other educational settings. These experiences, combined with appropriate leadership skills, will enable current and future educational leaders to successfully plan for and implement computer and communications technologies into their respective educational settings.
  
  •  

    EDL 7050 - School Finance and Business Administration (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Designed to examine current practices in public finance. Emphasis will be placed on the funding for public schools, and the relationship of that funding to the support for other public and private agencies. Demographics and political trends will be used to project funding needs for planning purposes. The course also examines the application of current management practices to the business administration function of public school administration. Particular emphasis is placed on the relationship between facilities planning and funding practices in public education.
  
  •  

    EDL 7065 - Writing for the Professional Educator (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed for professional educators seeking to gain knowledge and skill in using writing effectively as a major component of leadership and management in educational settings. Topics include understanding the writing process in professional settings, tailoring messages for audience and purpose, using different forms of writing in the profession, applying technology tools for writing, and understanding the relationship between writing and speaking in developing communication effectiveness as a leader.
  
  •  

    EDL 7099 - Professional Seminar (1)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The purpose of this seminar is to provide doctoral students an opportunity to discuss topics arising from course work; to report on internships and research assistantships; and to explore possible dissertation topics. Individual faculty and faculty panels will, from time to time, join the seminar to discuss their research. Seminar students will develop a portfolio reflecting the development of dissertation topics. The portfolio will provide students a means by which they can present evidence of their progress for consideration by advisors and other faculty. Students should expect to maintain the portfolio throughout their course work.
  
  •  

    EDL 7110 - Survey of Research Methodologies in Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course provides students with the requisite skills for reading and understanding contemporary research in education, and examining researchers’ motivations for selecting particular research and assessment methodologies. The course will acquaint students with the wide variety of sources of research journals; to a variety of available databases; to a variety of available measurement and assessment instruments; and to a wide range of methodological applications in education. The research examples will be from the wide area of educational leadership.
  
  •  

    EDL 7120 - Advanced Tests and Measurements (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Familiarize advanced graduate students with the techniques of instrument construction and validation and with the analysis of scores obtained from psychometric instruments. Techniques for designing survey instruments and tests of achievement and the analysis of the results of interest and personality inventories and other mental measurements will be covered.
    Prerequisite: EDL 7110  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    EDL 7130 - Multivariate Statistics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Emphasizes the use of statistical tools to organize and analyze large and complex data bases using multiple correlation, factor analysis, cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, and trend analysis techniques.
    Prerequisite: EDL 7110  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    EDL 7150 - Inferential Statistics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Deals with the application of parametric and non- parametric techniques in hypothesis testing and other inferential situations. The course includes some basic hypothesis testing theory, as well as theory involving various well known types of distributions of data. Students will have the opportunity to learn techniques for determining probability estimates in hypothesis testing and will also be required to use the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) in hypothesis testing tasks using SPSS/PC+ Studentware.
    Prerequisites: a background in statistics, EDL 7110  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    EDL 7160 - Qualitative Research Methods (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course emphasizes qualitative methods of data analysis and collection and how they can be compared and contrasted to quantitative research. Students will be expected to learn a variety of observational methods and interview techniques. Selecting from these methods, students will design and implement their own research projects. This course will emphasize the process of producing and interpreting qualitative research by critically examining the intricate relationships between theories, hypotheses, variables, and data.
    Prerequisites are an introductory course in tests and measurements, an introductory descriptive statistics course, and a course in inferential statistics.
  
  •  

    EDL 7165 - Quantitative Approaches in Non-Experimental Studies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course provides students the requisite skills and experiences in non-experimental research design to allow the critical examination of non-experimental studies and the design of studies like those that will be typically appropriate to educational and institutional settings. The course will provide students with an understanding of the adaptation of correlational and experimental models to research settings and data sets that do not fit experimental assumptions. A wide variety of examples from the professional literature will be reviewed and students will engage in the design of studies.
    Prerequisites: EDL 7110  and completion of the EDL Doctoral Program statistical prerequisite.
  
  •  

    EDL 7170 - Program Evaluation and Policy Analysis (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides a broad survey of educational evaluation theory and practice, and the relationship of evaluation to educational policy analysis, along with practical experience in designing educational evaluations and policy studies. The course begins with an examination of the historical underpinnings of educational evaluation and policy analysis, their role in improving education, their points of distinction from other forms of systematic inquiry, and the origins of the variety of alternative conceptions of evaluation and policy analysis in practice today. This examination is followed by an in-depth study of a variety of evaluation and policy analysis models.
  
  •  

    EDL 7180 - Advanced Qualitative Research in Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course provides students with advanced knowledge (i.e., the theoretical bases) and skills in qualitative research. Advanced-level analysis and interpretation, linked with the theoretical underpinnings of both general qualitative research and the doctoral student’s particular preferred method, will be a central focus of this course. Individual attention will be given to the students, to the extent possible. Honing of the student’s writing (i.e., presentation/ representation of a qualitative study) will also be a prominent aspect of this course. Students will undertake a small-scale qualitative study in this course in order to concretize and apply the concepts and practice the skills learned.
  
  •  

    EDL 7190 - Research Design in Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to provide doctoral students with an in-depth analysis of the methods and procedures of research in education. Topics will include conceptualizing educational research, writing research proposals, constructing measurement instruments, collecting and analyzing qualitative and quantitative data, and drawing inferences. Students who successfully complete the course will be able to make proper decisions regarding appropriate designs and methods for investigating different research questions, and will be able to plan and implement a research project for their dissertations.
  
  •  

    EDL 7500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    EDL 7530-7549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    EDL 7900 - Internship (3-6)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The internship is a full-year experience under the co-sponsorship of an appropriate educational agency and Appalachian State University. The student will engage in activities designed to bring the relationship of theory and practice into clear focus. Attendance at seminars on campus will be required.
  
  •  

    EDL 7989 - Doctoral Research (1-9)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing doctoral research.
  
  •  

    EDL 7999 - Dissertation (1-9)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Students must complete a minimum of 6 s.h. to satisfy the Ed.D. degree requirements. Students are advised to register for 3 s.h. for two consecutive semesters to complete requirements. If requirements are not complete at this time, students will continue to register for a minimum of 1 s.h. until the dissertation is complete.

English

  
  •  

    ENG 5000 - Bibliography and Research (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of bibliographical problems, types of research organization and reporting of research. Required in the first semester for beginning graduate students. Required of all students.
  
  •  

    ENG 5123 - Teaching ENG 1100, Introduction to Literature (1)


    When Offered: Spring
    Theory and practice in teaching ENG 1100, Introduction to Literature. ENG 5123 counts toward the graduate certificate program in Rhetoric and Composition, but not for the Master of Arts degrees in English.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ENG 5150 - Teaching Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years.
    An examination of the theory and practice of teaching literature courses as informed by recent pedagogical scholarship. This course is designed to prepare students to teach at the college level.
  
  •  

    ENG 5160 - Teaching Apprenticeship (1)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course provides a supervised experience in college teaching through direct participation in a classroom setting. Each student will work closely with a faculty mentor who is teaching an undergraduate course and will be actively engaged in the classroom. This course must be repeated for a total credit of two semester hours.
  
  •  

    ENG 5200 - Issues in Teaching English (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An advanced course in teaching theory and practice for secondary school teachers. Emphasis is placed on practical applications for the teaching of writing and literature.
  
  •  

    ENG 5400 - Appalachian Writing Project (6)


    When Offered: Summer Session.On Demand
    An intensive summer institute for kindergarten through college teachers interested in the teaching of writing. Explores composition theory with an emphasis on the connections among theory, practice, and pedagogy. Teachers will develop curriculum, collect resources, and re-connect as fully functioning writers. The Appalachian Writing Project is built upon the National Writing Project model.
  
  •  

    ENG 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Directed study of a topic not offered in regularly scheduled courses.
  
  •  

    ENG 5520 - Technical Writing (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    In this course, students conduct audience analyses, give oral presentations, and create documents representing a number of technical writing genres, including user manuals, instructions, and proposals.
  
  •  

    ENG 5525 - Product of Learning (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    ENG 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Content to vary; may be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
  
  •  

    ENG 5560 - Adolescent Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course introduces students to the varied and multi-cultural field of adolescent literature. Students focus on various genres, including realistic fiction, romance and adventure, science fiction/fantasy, autobiography, and poetry. Content includes pertinent criticism, important bibliographies, research studies, historical analysis, and increasingly sophisticated pedagogical resources. Students will use the works they read, current research, and web-based resources to create curricula appropriate for adolescent readers.
  
  •  

    ENG 5570 - Studies in American Indian Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Alternate years.
    Advanced study of major American Indian writers from oral traditions through the present.
    [Dual- listed with ENG 4570.]
  
  •  

    ENG 5585 - Studies in Ethnic American Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An advanced in-depth and multi-cultural examination of major ethnic American writers.
    [Dual-listed with ENG 4585.]
  
  •  

    ENG 5600 - Literary Criticism and Theory (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Alternate years
    A study of key issues in contemporary literary and cultural theory and in the history of literary criticism. Emphasis on practical applications of theoretical approaches. Offered alternate years with ENG 5660 .
  
  •  

    ENG 5640 - Cultural Studies (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    A study of literature as a cultural practice and of related cultural practices from the perspective of literature. Offered alternate years with ENG 5650 .
  
  •  

    ENG 5650 - Gender Studies (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    A critical study of the significance of gender in literature and other art forms. Offered alternate years with ENG 5640 .
  
  •  

    ENG 5660 - Advanced Seminar in Major Authors (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An intensive examination of a major author writing in English whose work is recognized as essential to a comprehensive understanding of literary culture and history. Offered alternate years with ENG 5600 .
  
  •  

    ENG 5710 - Advanced Folklore (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An in-depth and multi-cultural study of one or more folklore genres in cultural context with interdisciplinary approaches from the humanities and social sciences. It is recommended that ENG 3050 (Studies in Folklore) be taken prior to this course.
    [Dual-listed with ENG 4810.]
  
  •  

    ENG 5720 - Appalachian Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of major regional movements, genres, writers in the Appalachian mountains, from settlement to the present. Content and approach may vary.
    [Dual-listed with ENG 4720.]
  
  •  

    ENG 5760 - Studies in American Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An intensive study of selected United States literary forms, cultural concepts, or literary/artistic movements.
  
  •  

    ENG 5770 - Colonial and Federal American Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An intensive study in selected major authors from the founding of the English colonies through the early stage of the American Republic. Offered alternate years with ENG 5780 .
  
  •  

    ENG 5780 - Nineteenth-Century American Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An intensive study of the works of such major writers as Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, and Crane. Offered alternate years with ENG 5770 .
  
  •  

    ENG 5790 - Twentieth-Century American Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An intensive study of such major writers as Frost, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, and Hemingway.
  
  •  

    ENG 5810 - Chaucer (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    A critical study of The Canterbury Tales, other works selected from the Chaucer canon, and related medieval texts. Offered alternate years with ENG 5840 .
  
  •  

    ENG 5825 - Studies in Sixteenth-Century British Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    Studies in the literature of the British Isles published between 1485 and 1603, the years of the major Tudor monarchs. Writers covered could include Malory, More, Wyatt, Surrey, Elizabeth I, Shakespeare (as a lyric and narrative poet), Lyly, Kyd, Marlowe, Sidney, Raleigh, and Spenser.
  
  •  

    ENG 5835 - Studies in Seventeenth-Century British Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    Studies in the literature of the British Isles published between 1603 and 1680, the years of the Stuart monarchs and the Cromwellian Interregnum. Writers covered could include Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Herrick, Wroth, Bacon, Burton, Hobbes, Webster, Middleton, Ford, Marvell, Bunyan, and Milton.
  
  •  

    ENG 5840 - Shakespeare (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An intensive study of selected works from the Shakespeare canon. Offered alternate years with ENG 5810 .
  
  •  

    ENG 5865 - Eighteenth-Century British Studies (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An intensive study of selected topics of major literary interest during the period 1660-1800, e.g., Restoration Drama, the Tory Wits, and Johnson and his Circle.
  
  •  

    ENG 5870 - Romantic Period (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An intensive study of selected authors of the Romantic period considered in relation to general concepts of romanticism.
  
  •  

    ENG 5880 - Victorian Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    A study of selected British poetry, novels, or non-fiction prose of the latter part of the nineteenth century.
  
  •  

    ENG 5890 - Twentieth-Century British Literature (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An intensive study of the works of such major writers as Yeats, Lawrence, and Joyce.
  
  •  

    ENG 5910 - World Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    A seminar in Western or non-Western literature read in English. Areas of focus may include Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas.
  
  •  

    ENG 5930 - Transnational Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    Advanced and comparative study of literature that crosses traditionally defined national boundaries.
  
  •  

    ENG 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  
  •  

    ENG 5998 - Thesis Preparation (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Students carry out principal research for a thesis topic, meet regularly with a thesis advisor, and revise and defend the thesis prospectus.
  
  •  

    ENG 5999 - Thesis (3-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring

Exercise Science

  
  •  

    E S 5000 - Introduction to Research Principles and Design (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The application of research principles to the management/administration of sport and exercise, the physiological responses associated with exercise, and the biomechanical assessment of movement and sport skills. Emphasis shall be placed on the appropriate application of research design and the utilization of scientific writing skills culminating in the development of a research prospectus.
  
  •  

    E S 5060 - Practicum: Strength and Conditioning (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Practical application of scientific principles and concepts to physical conditioning programs. Students will participate in relevant practical activities involving or related to exercise science or sports medicine.
 

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