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2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin
Appalachian State University
   
 
  Nov 22, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

Course Catalog

Contract All Courses |

Graduate courses at Appalachian are numbered 5000 and above. 5000 is master’s level; 6000 is specialist level; 7000 is doctoral level. Courses numbered below 5000 may not count toward the minimum hours required for a graduate degree or certificate program of study.

Courses for Continued Enrollment

Courses numbered 5989/7989 courses are intended for continued enrollment purposes only and do not count toward the minimum hours required for a graduate degree or certificate program of study. All other courses described in this bulletin (except courses numbered 5989 and 7989) are courses that count as a required or elective course on a program of study for at least one graduate degree.

Cross-listed Courses

Several courses are shared across two or more disciplines or departments, and as such are cross listed under multiple prefixes. Students may only count one version of such a course on a program of study. These cross-listed courses are indicated with a notation in (parentheses) at the end of the course description.

Dual-listed Courses

Selected courses at the 5000 level are dual listed with senior undergraduate (4000-level) courses, meaning that the two courses may be offered in the same room at the same time. Graduate students in these 5000-level courses will have additional requirements specified on the syllabus to ensure a more in-depth study of the course topics. These dual-listed courses are indicated with a notation in [brackets] at the end of the course description. Graduate students may include up to 12 semester hours of dual-listed 5000-level courses on a program of study.

NOTE: When a prerequisite is at the undergraduate level (below the 5000 level), students should consult with the department regarding whether they have the relevant background to succeed in the graduate course.

 

Accounting

Prerequisite to enrollment in a graduate course offered by the Department of Accounting is admission to the MS in Accounting program, or permission of the instructor and the departmental chair. In addition, enrollment in MBA courses requires permission of the MBA Program Director. A non-degree student must also obtain permission from the Graduate School to enroll in 5000-level courses.

  
  •  

    ACC 5000 - Accounting Research and Data Presentation (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Study of methods used in research and data presentation in accounting; practice in using those methods.
  
  •  

    ACC 5080 - Taxation of Business Entities (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Examination of the tax system faced by businesses operating in the United States. Business entities covered include C Corporations, S Corporations and partnerships. Topics include business formations, transactions between the entity and the owners, distributions, liquidations and reorganizations. Projects facilitate knowledge development of a variety of professional skills.
    Prerequisite: ACC 3580 (Individual Income Taxation) or equivalent with a minimum grade of “C-“.
    [Dual-listed with ACC 4580.]
  
  •  

    ACC 5180 - Advanced Issues in Corporate Taxation (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An advanced study of the taxation of corporations and shareholders at the federal level, with emphasis on Subchapter C, and tax planning.
    Prerequisite: ACC 3580 (Individual Income Taxation).
  
  •  

    ACC 5210 - Advanced Managerial Accounting (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Focus is on the controller’s role in the decision-making process. Integration of accounting knowledge with other business and non-business disciplines is an important objective of this course. Topics may include, but are not limited to: cost accounting, profit planning and control, data analytics, working-capital management, transfer pricing, tax and risk management, and payroll systems.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ACC 5230 - International Accounting (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to provide students with a background in international accounting. Emphasis will be placed upon the fact that accounting is not just a doctrine that has been handed down from generation to generation, but is actually the product of the environment in which it is used.
  
  •  

    ACC 5240 - Sustainability Accounting and Reporting (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course focuses on the critical role of accounting in helping managers address sustainability issues and measure sustainability performance. Because traditional models in accounting and financial reporting may be difficult to apply when measuring sustainability performance, frameworks such as the Triple Bottom Line concept or the Balanced Scorecard have been developed to accommodate the measurement of a firm’s performance on 3 levels: economic prosperity, environmental impact, and social justice. This course focuses on the challenges faced by managers and accountants in using traditional accounting techniques to measure and report on sustainable activities, and offers guidance on how to overcome these challenges in order to meet the needs of interested stakeholders. The course will examine the current state of sustainability measurement, disclosure, and assurance practices, as well as associated ethical issues, regulatory developments, and reporting standards.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ACC 5270 - Current Issues in Technology and AIS (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A current-issues course designed to explore new developments in business technology and accounting information systems.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ACC 5280 - Partnerships and S Corporations (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the tax implications of forming and operating conduit type businesses, with emphasis on planning for tax minimization.
    Prerequisite or corequisite: ACC 5080 /ACC 4580 (Taxation of Business Entities) or ACC 5180 , or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ACC 5310 - Auditing Theory Seminar (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of advanced concepts, theories and techniques applied to external financial auditing and other assurance services. Topics may include forensic accounting, sustainability assurance services, internal controls, risk assessment, and the current regulatory environment.
    Prerequisite: ACC 4560 (Introduction to Auditing) or equivalent.
  
  •  

    ACC 5340 - Accounting in the Business Environment (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Current behavioral accounting issues are examined, with an emphasis on ethics. Focus is on the roles of accountants in society. Topics are explored in a seminar environment.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ACC 5350 - Accounting Capstone Seminar (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course focuses on integrating classroom knowledge to solve accounting-based problems in a capstone experience. Students will complete case studies involving complex decisions, including ethical dilemmas, which require analysis, synthesis, prescription and application of accounting concepts. Domestic and global issues will be explored in a seminar environment with a strong emphasis on research, writing and oral communication.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ACC 5370 - Analysis and Design of Accounting Systems (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Focus is on the planning, analysis, and design of information systems. Topics include SDLC methodologies; feasibility analysis; project management; information-gathering techniques; use- case, structural, and behavioral modeling; computing architectures; security; user interface design; data storage techniques; and object approaches.
  
  •  

    ACC 5380 - Multijurisdictional Taxation (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of state and local tax laws including income, franchise, property, sales and use and excise taxes. The state and local taxation of individual and business entities is covered and planning opportunities are discussed. Additionally, the course examines the U.S. laws of international taxation as well as tax issues affecting U.S. multinational companies.
    Prerequisite: ACC 3580 (Individual Income Taxation) or equivalent.
  
  •  

    ACC 5390 - Contemporary Issues in Accounting (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A seminar approach to exploring contemporary issues facing the accounting profession. Selected topics may include issues related to the current financial reporting environment, regulatory actions impacting the accounting profession, corporate governance, social responsibility, global events, ethical issues and other relevant topics as identified. Students will develop competency in the professional accounting research process, an understanding of applying ethical decision-making frameworks, and improved performance in ethical thinking skills.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ACC 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    ACC 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    ACC 5550 - Accounting for Not-for-Profit and Governmental Organizations (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Theory and practice of budgetary and fund accounting, financial reporting, measures of output and performance, techniques for planning and control, and auditing for non-profit and governmental entities.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ACC 5570 - Accounting Systems (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of emerging issues in accounting information systems. Students will develop competence in understanding and interacting with various systems.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ACC 5580 - Tax Planning and Research (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A research oriented course designed to emphasize the need for tax planning. The student will be required to research and to make class presentations as to her or his findings.
    Prerequisite: ACC 3580 (Individual Income Taxation) or equivalent.
  
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    ACC 5590 - Advanced Accounting Topics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of accounting issues related to business combinations and consolidated entities, partnerships, foreign transactions and operations, and other areas of concern as they are identified.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  
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    ACC 5640 - Accounting Regulation (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of regulation of the accounting profession, with emphasis on taxation, business law, and professional standards.
    Prerequisite or corequisite: ACC 5080 /ACC 4580 (Taxation of Business Entities) or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ACC 5660 - Auditing Concepts and Applications (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An in-depth study of professional auditing standards and application to audit engagements. Emphasis will be placed on system analysis, the relationship of internal control to audit objectives, and the purpose of selected audit procedures. Cases and simulations will be used where applicable.
    Prerequisite: ACC 4560 (Introduction to Auditing) or equivalent.
  
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    ACC 5680 - Wealth and Tax Planning (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the federal transfer tax laws, with emphasis on family tax planning; also, a study of the income taxation of estates and trusts.
    Prerequisite: ACC 3580 (Individual Income Taxation) or equivalent.
  
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    ACC 5780 - Issues in Taxation (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course examines specialized issues in taxation. Topics may include exempt organizations, advanced individual tax issues, selected corporate tax issues, and basic concepts in multi-state and international tax.
    Prerequisite: ACC 3580 (Individual Income Taxation) or equivalent.
  
  •  

    ACC 5900 - Internship (3-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A full-time work situation for students in the Master of Science in Accounting program. A maximum of three hours may be included toward the thirty credit hours required in the program of study.
    Prerequisite: permission of the accounting internship coordinator.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  
  •  

    ACC 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. ACC 5989 does not count toward a degree.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  
  •  

    ACC 5990 - Survey of Financial Accounting (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    An intensive study of financial accounting topics in conjunction with the business environment.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  
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    ACC 5999 - Thesis (6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.

Anthropology

  
  •  

    ANT 5120 - Appalachian Culture and Social Organization (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Exploration of dominant cultural principles and values and their relationship to historical, economic, and political themes, and to social organization and social dynamics; analysis of the socio-economic structure of Appalachian communities, and of the meaning of kinship and its relationship to community organization and processes.
  
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    ANT 5200 - Sustainable Development: Theory, Method and Case (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    A seminar on the social theory and applied methods of project interventions in communities and regions. A survey of relevant economic and ecological theory and assistance in developing a comprehensive research proposal.
  
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    ANT 5410 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An introduction to the art of ethnographic fieldwork and research design. Topics include ethnographic methods, proposal writing, and research ethics. Students will carry out an original research project during the course using methods such as participant-observation, interviewing, focus group work, and audio and visual documentation.
  
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    ANT 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ANT 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An opportunity to study a special topic or combination of topics not otherwise provided for in the anthropology curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
  
  •  

    ANT 5565 - Agrarian Studies and Rural Development (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Theoretical and descriptive analysis of peasants, small farmers and corporate agribusinesses through political economic and cultural perspectives in the context of globalization. Explores agrarian social movements and prospects for more just and sustainable outcomes from a comparative perspective. A research paper reflecting theory, method and case development is required.
    [Dual-listed with ANT 4565.]
  
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    ANT 5600 - Medical Anthropology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of health, illness, and the treatment of disease from a cross-cultural perspective. Includes discussion of various theories of illness, types of healers, and the empirical basis for folk medicine and alternative forms of therapy.
  
  •  

    ANT 5610 - Ethnographic Field School (2-6)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Students will be immersed in a cultural setting and learn to use standard ethnographic techniques to analyze and interpret the culture. There will be instruction in the use of qualitative methods, such as observation, mapping, genealogies and life histories, formal interviewing, and cultural domain analysis. Students will design and carry out an ethnographic research project.
  
  •  

    ANT 5900 - Field Experience: Internship (3-12)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Supervised placement in a setting which provides an opportunity to observe and practice anthropological skills.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  
  •  

    ANT 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. ANT 5989 does not count toward a degree.
    Graded on an S/U basis.

Appalachian Studies

  
  •  

    A S 5000 - Bibliography and Research (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Instruction and study in bibliographical problems and types of source materials available in Appalachian topics; methods used in locating and evaluating the sources and in reporting of research. Required in the first semester of beginning graduate students.
  
  •  

    A S 5005 - Global Appalachia (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Introduces students to comparative mountain studies using the Appalachian Mountains as a focal point. The course places the Appalachian Mountains and Appalachian studies within an international context, considering how mountain cultures, economies, and societies around the world interact with regional, national, and international powers. Students consider how Appalachia compares to and contrasts with other mountain regions.
  
  •  

    A S 5015 - Old Time Music Traditions (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    A multi-cultural study of old time music and its roots, with interdisciplinary approaches from the humanities and social sciences.
    Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with AS 4015.]
  
  •  

    A S 5020 - Colloquium in Appalachian Studies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A team-taught interdisciplinary colloquium which will examine contemporary regional, state, and national issues that affect the Appalachian region. The course is designed to help students understand the Appalachian region from a multidisciplinary perspective. The course should be taken by the student during the last semester of residence in the program.
  
  •  

    A S 5025 - Pedagogy for Appalachian Studies (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A course designed for graduate teaching assistants responsible for teaching Appalachian Studies courses. Students will learn strategies for effective teaching in face-to-face, online, and hybrid college classrooms and will develop skills in constructing a syllabus; writing learning objectives; structuring reading and writing assignments; and assessing student outcomes. Participants will be introduced to educational philosophies for college-level teaching, will learn about current issues in the teaching of Appalachian Studies, and will learn how to access teaching resources.
  
  •  

    A S 5030 - Bluegrass Traditions (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    The genesis of bluegrass music, through its major redefinition in the mid-1970s, to its diverse interpretations today.
    Lecture three hours.
  
  •  

    A S 5035 - Local Music Traditions (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    This seminar explores and defines musical styles related to folk and popular musics in Northwestern North Carolina in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
  
  •  

    A S 5040 - Documentary Field Research Methods (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides students the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of field research in Appalachian Studies. During this course, students will be introduced to the history of documentary as field research and are required to complete a set of writing assignments to demonstrate their understanding of this history. Students will also complete a series of exercises to build their multimedia skills. Students must then use best practices in field research to develop a final project. The expectation is that this final product will connect to thesis research, or become part of a professional presentation or published article. Topics will include oral histories, folklore, and community organizing.
  
  •  

    A S 5050 - Qualitative Research Methods (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course trains students in social scientific research methods with an emphasis on qualitative ethnographic research and research design. Course readings survey the research strategies of participant observation, questionnaire design, interview techniques, sampling, ethnographic writing, and research applications in Appalachia. Students will develop ethnographic research projects as part of the course.
  
  •  

    A S 5060 - Community Based Research (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years.
    This course teaches engaged, student-based research with a non-profit and/or local government partner. Students will explore applied research and project management skills in support of the strategic goals of a community-based organization. Course readings and workshops will complement on-site research projects and a public research presentation to project partners and community stakeholders.
  
  •  

    A S 5065 - Sustainability and the Arts in Appalachia (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course explores theory and practice in the growing field of sustainability and the arts as it applies to the Appalachian region. Students will study global cultural theory in the fields of ethnomusicology, creative placemaking, and the arts. This theoretical approach will be grounded in participatory projects supporting local cultures.
  
  •  

    A S 5110 - Ethnographic Field Study (1-6)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Variable content. Course involves immersion in a field setting either in the U.S. or through study abroad. Topics, approach, and field sites will be indicated on course syllabi and semester schedules. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
  
  •  

    A S 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    A S 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    A S 5900 - Internship (1-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  
  •  

    A S 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. A S 5989 does not count toward a degree.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  
  •  

    A S 5998 - Thesis Preparation (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Students complete principal research for a thesis topic, meet regularly with a thesis advisor, and revise and defend the thesis prospectus.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  
  •  

    A S 5999 - Thesis (3-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.

Applied Music

Additional offerings by the Hayes School of Music include courses in Music (MUS)

  
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    AMU 6001-6026 - Applied Music (Major-principal) (2-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Two 30-minute individual lessons or equivalent in individual and/or class lessons and six practice hours per week for each semester hour credit. Additional fee (Summer Term).
  
  •  

    AMU 6001-6026 - Applied Music (Secondary) (1-1)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    One 30-minute individual lesson and six practice hours per week. Additional fee (Summer Term).

Astronomy

Additional offerings by the Department of Physics and Astronomy include courses in Physics (PHY)

  
  •  

    AST 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An intensive study of a single topic in astronomy or astrophysics.

Biology

Additional offerings by the Department of Biology include courses in General Science (G S)

  
  •  

    BIO 5000 - Bibliography and Research (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of scientific writing and oral presentations using exercises in writing and speaking. Skills in searching the literature, presenting papers in specific formats, and reviewing science writing will be developed. Students are required to attend and critique science seminars and to develop a presentation using modern computer technologies to present before fellow students. Required in the first year of graduate study.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  
  •  

    BIO 5202 - Organismal Ecology (4)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    The study of the relationships among individual organisms and the biotic and abiotic environments. Structure/function relationships will be emphasized throughout the course. Topics to be covered include: energy budgets; gas exchange by plants and animals; resource acquisition; water relations; and morphological, physiological and behavioral adaptations to environmental selection pressures. Lab will cover techniques of measuring gas exchange in both animals and plants; nutrient uptake; water relations; foraging efficiencies and physiological optima; and techniques in microclimate measurement.
    Prerequisites: BIO 3302 (Ecology) and either BIO 3301 (Human Systems Physiology) or BIO 5555 .
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  
  •  

    BIO 5212 - Population Ecology (4)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    This course will employ genetic and ecological principles to explore the population dynamics of plants and animals. The role of populations in evolutionary and ecological processes will be emphasized. Topics will include conservation and loss of genetic variation in natural populations; growth and regulation of populations; and factors affecting their demography, distribution and abundance. Labs will include models of growth and regulation along with techniques for analysis of populations in the field.
    Prerequisites: BIO 3302 (Ecology).
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  
  •  

    BIO 5222 - Communities and Ecosystem Ecology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A holistic consideration of the interactions among populations of different species with their biotic and abiotic environments. Topics to be covered include succession; patterns in species diversity; community productivity; biogeochemical cycling; ecosystem structure and function. Labs will involve studies of net primary production, nutrient cycling, succession, and diversity, and will include both laboratory and field work.
    Prerequisite: BIO 3302 (Ecology).
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  
  •  

    BIO 5240 - Aquatic Biology (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course will introduce students to the foundations, key concepts and current topics in freshwater, estuarine, marine and groundwater biology, ecology and management. Students will learn about how these ecosystems are tied to all of earth’s life forms and ecosystems as well as humanity’s role in global water cycles. Laboratory sessions will be used to develop computer, bench and field skills key to the study of aquatic ecosystems. Students will learn from and interact with personnel from state and federal resource-management agencies, nongovernment organizations and other stakeholders and develop skills essential to a career as an aquatic scientist.
    Prerequisites: An undergraduate course in ecology or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours. Lab three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4240.]
  
  •  

    BIO 5250 - Current Topics in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This seminar is designed to encourage students to delve more deeply into the ecological and evolutionary literature, with a focus on current issues. The students will be required to interpret the results of recent literature (published within the last year), and to present those findings to other students and faculty. Students will be asked to do one or two presentations per semester, to critique the other students, and to engage in discussion of all the papers read. Course content changes each offering. May be repeated for a total credit of 12 semester hours.
  
  •  

    BIO 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    BIO 5502 - Freshwater Ecology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the abiotic and biotic factors that influence the distribution and abundance of species in freshwater communities. Laboratory exercises include field trips to local streams and lakes.
    Prerequisites: BIO 1101 (Biology in Society I) and BIO 1102 (Biology in Society II); BIO 2000 (Intro to Botany), BIO 2001 (Intro to Zoology), BIO 3302 (Ecology) or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  
  •  

    BIO 5504 - Taxonomy of Vascular Plants (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    A study of the gross structure, reproduction, and development of the spermatophytes. Special emphasis is placed upon the classification and nomenclature of the spermatophytes.
    Lecture two hours, field work two hours.
  
  •  

    BIO 5505 - Nature Study (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Study of common plants and animals with emphasis on ecology, collecting techniques and identification. Designed for students with limited biology backgrounds. Not open to biology majors for credit.
    [Dual-listed with BIO 4550.]
  
  •  

    BIO 5506 - Advanced Animal Physiology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A comprehensive study of the physiology of the nervous, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory and endocrine systems with an emphasis on system coordination and integration. Laboratory experiments, readings and reports.
    Prerequisite: a course in general physiology or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  
  •  

    BIO 5507 - Comparative Invertebrate Physiology (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides a comprehensive study of physiological processes in invertebrate animals, with emphasis on adaptations to differing life history strategies. The principal goal of the course is to contribute significantly to the student’s understanding of basic biological theory. Some prior knowledge of cellular physiology, classification, and morphology of invertebrates will be assumed.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
  
  •  

    BIO 5508 - Biogeography (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The biological, climatological, geographic, and geological factors which affect the distribution of animal and plants. Patterns of distribution will be studied in relation to various sizes of geographical units.
    Lecture three hours.
  
  •  

    BIO 5512 - Local Flora (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    A study of the common flora and economic plants of North Carolina including collection, identification, and methods of preservation.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory and field work two hours.
  
  •  

    BIO 5513 - Plant Molecular Biology (4)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    A study of molecular aspects of plant life, examining features that distinguish plants from other organisms on a cellular and molecular level. The laboratory introduces methods and applications of modern plant science and biotechnology. Students should be familiar with the basic concepts of molecular biology and plant genetics and have some experience in molecular laboratory techniques.
    Prerequisites: BIO 3800 (Molecular Biology) or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4513.]
  
  •  

    BIO 5514 - Plant Anatomy and Morphology (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A general survey of the external and internal structure of plants; detailed study of anatomy and morphology of representative plants from all the divisions.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours.
  
  •  

    BIO 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  
  •  

    BIO 5551 - Ornithology (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    The morphology, physiology, behavior, ecology and identification of birds. Early morning field trips are required. Extended field trips to a variety of habitats will be arranged. Lecture and laboratory will emphasize techniques of observing, recording and analyzing data using a research project format.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4551.]
  
  •  

    BIO 5552 - Entomology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the insects, including relevant anatomy for identification and physiology for function, with a special emphasis on the ecological roles of insects and their interaction with other organisms. Evolutionary relationships with related arthropods are also covered. Basic taxonomy of the major insect groups is addressed with a required insect collection, which teaches collecting and preservation techniques. Students are involved in basic experimentation that allows for investigating this very diverse animal group.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual listed with BIO 4552.]
  
  •  

    BIO 5555 - Plant Physiology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the basic principles of plant physiology and fundamental processes such as cell properties, water relations, growth, photosynthesis, respiration, and mineral nutrition.
    Prerequisites: CHE 1101 (Intro to Chemistry I), CHE 1110 (Intro to Chemistry Laboriatory I), CHE 1102 (Intro to Chemistry II), CHE 1120 (Intro to Chemistry Lab II) and CHE 2201 (Organic Chemistry I) is strongly recommended.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4555.]
  
  •  

    BIO 5556 - Mycology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    An investigation of the fungi with particular reference to the techniques of working with these organisms.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4556.]
  
  •  

    BIO 5557 - Ichthyology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course focuses on the ecology, evolution and diversity of fishes. Aspects of fish physiology and behavior will also be covered along with important conservation issues. In the laboratory, students will have the opportunity to learn how to identify major groups of fishes with emphasis on freshwater species.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual listed with BIO 4557.]
  
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    BIO 5558 - Taxonomy of the Fleshy Fungi (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An in-depth study of the fleshy fungi [mushrooms (agarics), chanterelles, hydnums, polypores, and corals] with an emphasis on morphology, systematics, and ecology. Methods of collection, macroscopic and microscopic dissection, identification, and preservation are covered. Fields trips are required.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4558.]
  
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    BIO 5559 - Mammalogy (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    The natural history, distribution, adaptations, taxonomy and economic importance of mammals. Field trips and visits to zoos will be arranged.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4559.]
  
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    BIO 5560 - Herpetology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    The history, morphology, systematics, physiology, and distribution of amphibians and reptiles. Methods of collecting, storing, studying and identifying specimens as well as behavioral aspects of species in their natural habitats will be covered. Field trips will be required.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4560.]
  
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    BIO 5563 - Biology of Aging (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    General study of biological/physiological changes over time in the structure and function of the systems of organisms with emphasis on the human body.
    Prerequisites: BIO 1101 (Biology in Society I) and BIO 1102 (Biology in Society II), or equivalent.
    Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4563.]
  
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    BIO 5564 - Microscopy (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the principles and techniques of biological microscopy. Lectures include discussions on preparative techniques for various types of bioimaging, the optical theories behind the imaging technologies, and the structure and function of cellular organelles. Laboratories examine practical techniques of tissue preparation for various kinds of microscopy, the effective use of various types of microscopes, and the interpretation of data obtained from various imaging systems.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4564.]
  
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    BIO 5567 - Lichenology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of the morphology, diversity, evolution, ecology, physiology, and chemistry of lichens as well as their significance as biological indicators. Field trips are required.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4567.]
  
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    BIO 5568 - Immunology (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the immune system with emphasis on cellular interactions involved in the generation of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Lecture includes discussions on inflammation, antibody diversity, tissue transplantation, and immunopathologies. Laboratories examine lymphoid tissue organization, lymphocyte function, and antibody-antigen reactions with emphasis on clinical application.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4568.]
  
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    BIO 5569 - Invertebrate Zoology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    Students will be introduced to the 34 extant major and minor invertebrate phyla which make up 99% of the Earth’s named animal species and virtually 100% of those animals yet undiscovered. The intriguing natural history, symmetry and development, mode of locomotion, nutrition, reproduction, and primary environments of the invertebrates will be discussed. Labs will emphasize invertebrate habitats, field collection, phylogenetic relationships as well as ecological and physiological adaptations and examination of major morphological characteristics.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours with required field trips. [Dual-listed with BIO 4569.]
  
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    BIO 5570 - Parasitology (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    A survey of protozoan, helminthic and arthropod parasites with emphasis on organisms of medical and veterinary importance.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4570.]
  
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    BIO 5571 - Plant-Insect Interactions in Terrestrial Ecosystems (4)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    A study of the associations between insects and plants, using lecture, class discussions and laboratory exercises. Lecture topics include constraints imposed by plants on herbivorous insects and the strategies insects use to overcome them, pollination biology and ecology and the interplay between biotic and abiotic factors in determining interactions. Students are expected to lead class discussions of current literature. Laboratory exercises are field-based mini-experiments leading to the development of an individual project with experimentation and paper presentation. As a graduate student, mentoring of undergraduate research projects is required.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4571.]
  
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    BIO 5572 - Virology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The objective of this course is to introduce students to the principles of virology as related to the structure, biochemistry, replication, pathogenesis and control of viruses. There will be an emphasis on disease processes and the interaction of animal viruses. General topics include the chemical and physical properties of viruses, virus classification, cultivation and assay of viruses, pathogenesis, persistent infections, biotechnology, and viruses as a cause of neoplasia. The students’ analytical and intuitive skills will be challenged by analyzing figures and data from journal articles in class discussions.
    Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4572.]
  
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    BIO 5575 - Ecotoxicology (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course introduces the various classes of toxicants, their fate within organisms and ecosystems, and the chemical transformations and mechanisms of toxicity. This course will also introduce students to standard lab and field toxicity tests, analysis of toxicity and quantification of toxins, data reduction and analysis, and the power of statistical analyses to identify significant effects. A case study approach will be utilized in lecture and labs to examine the toxic effects of heavy metals, organic compounds, insecticides, and environmental endocrine disrupters. Students will learn about important endpoints and bio-indicators of toxin exposure specific to each class of toxin and how they are used in ecological risk assessment. A service-learning component of the course will require students to design, write a mock grant proposal for, and lead a group toxicology project with a local community partner.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours with some required field trips. [Dual-listed with BIO 4575.]
  
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    BIO 5601 - Animal Behavior-Ethology (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    Basic principles of animal behavior are approached from an evolutionary perspective. Topics such as instinct, learning, biological clocks, sociobiology, communication and physiological mechanisms of behavior are stressed. Laboratory emphasizes techniques of observing, recording, and analyzing behavior using a research project format.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. [Dual-listed with BIO 4601.]
  
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    BIO 5650 - Bioinformatics (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Alternate years
    An introduction to computational molecular and cellular biology. Students will have the opportunity to learn how to mine biological databases for information; retrieve, analyze, and compare biological sequence data; and predict sequence features and relationships using computational tools.
    Prerequisite: BIO 3800 (Molecular Biology) or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours.
  
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    BIO 5700 - Advanced Cell Biology (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    Prerequisite: a class in cell biology, molecular biology, or biochemistry or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours.
  
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    BIO 5710 - Genomics (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An exploration of how genomic information is obtained; new insights gained from this information into the workings of life at the molecular, cellular and organismal level; and how this information is being used to understand evolution, symbiosis, pathogenesis, effectiveness of vaccines, cancer diagnosis and treatment, and other current issues.
    Prerequisites: BIO 3800 (Molecular Biology) with a grade of “C” or higher in each, or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours.
  
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    BIO 5720 - Gene Regulation (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Alternate years
    An exploration of the molecular principles underlying the regulation of the expression of a gene in the context of the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology. Topics include: the Central Dogma, DNA structure and packaging, general transcription, and cis and trans regulatory elements and factors.
    Prerequisites: BIO 3800 (Molecular Biology) with a grade of “C” or higher in each, or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours.
  
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    BIO 5777 - Biostatistics (4)


    When Offered: Fall
    An introduction to biological statistics, both parametric and non-parametric, including descriptive statistics, probability, inference testing, hypothesis development, t-tests, ANOVA, regression, categorical data analysis and basic experimental design. Laboratory is designed to allow students to analyze data using the SAS system.
    Prerequisite: STT 2810 (Introduction to Statistics) or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.
  
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    BIO 5900 - Internship (1-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Practical biological experiences in federal, state, and local agencies.
    Graded on an S/U basis. [Dual-listed with BIO 4900.]
 

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