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2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin
Appalachian State University
   
 
  Feb 24, 2018
 
 
    
2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

Reich College of Education

Contract All Courses |

Melba Spooner, Dean
N. Jordan, Associate Dean
Monica Lambert, Associate Dean

http://rcoe.appstate.edu

The Reich College of Education at Appalachian State University is widely recognized throughout the Southeast as a strong leader in teacher education and related programs. The College houses graduate degrees at the master’s, specialist, and doctoral levels, as well as a number of graduate certificates and teacher licensure-only programs.

The Reich College of Education is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education and the North Carolina State Board of Education.

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Sara Zimmerman, Interim Chair

ci.appstate.edu

Curriculum Specialist

currspec.appstate.edu

Sara Zimmerman, Graduate Program Director 
zimmermnsj@appstate.edu

The program seeks to prepare Curriculum-Instructional Specialists who demonstrate knowledge of:

  • The purposes and roles of schooling;
  • The basic structure, organization and philosophical theories of school supervision;
  • Principles of management and supervision;
  • Principles and practices of personnel performance appraisal;
  • Educational planning in relation to design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional systems;
  • Leadership roles and responsibilities;
  • The key role of human relations in instructional leadership;
  • Leadership in the effective utilization of knowledge generated by specialists in improving instructional programs;
  • Effective supervisory practices; and,
  • Curriculum planning and development.

The program also seeks to prepare candidates who demonstrate their abilities to:

  • Provide leadership in the implementation of instructional programs;
  • Work harmoniously and effectively with people from a wide variety of backgrounds;
  • Employ sound planning practices; and
  • Provide instructional leadership in a variety of settings while assisting teachers, administrators and other professional personnel.

Location of Program: This program is offered on campus in Boone in the format described in this Bulletin. Off-campus cohorts are started periodically, and follow a part-time extended program format. For information on upcoming off-campus cohorts, please contact the Office of Distance Education: distance.appstate.edu.

Elementary Education

Chrystal Dean, Graduate Degree and Certificate Program Director
deanco@appstate.edu

The master’s program leads to North Carolina master-level (M) licensure in elementary school teaching. Students in the program will demonstrate their ability to:

  • Explain the theoretical and philosophical bases for educational practices as they relate to the elementary school curriculum, and the interrelationships of subjects.
  • Understand the nature of the elementary school-age learner in relation to the learning and evaluation process.
  • Utilize research techniques in the design and implementation of curricula and activities in classroom settings.
  • Concentrate in one or more of the instructional areas of the elementary school curriculum.
  • Make critical decisions by synthesizing information relative to the development of appropriate living/learning environments for children enrolled in elementary education.
  • Identify major movements, issues and trends impacting elementary education, including multicultural education, technology, students with special needs, and parent involvement.

The Graduate Certificate in Elementary Mathematics Education is designed for in-service elementary education teachers who wish to work toward an endorsement in mathematics.

Location of Program: This program is offered on campus in Boone in the format described in this Bulletin. Off-campus cohorts are started periodically, and follow a part-time extended program format. For information on upcoming off-campus cohorts, please contact the Office of Distance Education: distance.appstate.edu.

Middle Grades Education

Chris Cook, Graduate Program Co-Director
cookcm5@appstate.edu

This program leads to North Carolina master-level (M) licensure in middle grades teaching. The program seeks to prepare teachers who:

  • are knowledgeable about the developmental characteristics of young adolescents and are able to conceptualize and apply that knowledge in the classroom;
  • are knowledgeable about at least one subject area;
  • possess a clear, research-based knowledge of developmentally responsive instruction and schooling;
  • have the specialized skills and knowledge needed to provide middle grades students with effective instruction; and,
  • demonstrate a dedication to middle grades education based on an accurate middle grades knowledge base.

Location of Program: This program is offered on campus in Boone in the format described in this Bulletin. Off-campus cohorts are started periodically, and follow a part-time extended program format. For information on upcoming off-campus cohorts, please contact the Office of Distance Education: distance.appstate.edu.

Middle and Secondary Teaching

http://mstgradcert.appstate.edu

Holly Thornton, Program Co-Director
thorntonhj@appstate.edu

Tracy Goodson-Espy, Program Co-Director
goodsonespyt@appstate.edu

The program provides a pathway to an initial teaching license for candidates who have earned a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution in a field related to the target license area. Successful completers will demonstrate achievement of all North Carolina Department of Public Instruction licensure requirements leading to both a graduate certificate and a recommendation for a teaching license by Appalachian State University.

The certificate program will expand on candidates’ knowledge in the specific discipline area (undergraduate preparation) and further integrate teaching theory and practice as well as prepare them for today’s culturally diverse and technology-enhanced classrooms.

This Graduate Certificate includes middle grades, career/technical education and secondary math, and secondary science tracks. The Graduate Certificate program is designed for individuals with related undergraduate degrees and preparation (e.g., business, preengineering, science, mathematics, history) who are seeking a North Carolina A-level teaching license for employment purposes or to allow for job transitions. In addition, current teachers who are interested in adding licensure in high-need areas or for other developmental age groups will benefit from this program.

Programs

Master of Arts

Graduate Certificate

Courses

Business Education

  •  

    B E 5555 - Advanced Methods in Teaching Business and Marketing Subjects (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides students advanced methodology and classroom strategies in business and marketing education. It places emphasis on current issues such as: best pedagogical practices for business and marketing subjects taught within the school setting, emerging learning environments in which all learners can be successful, authentic assessment appropriate to diverse learners, use of technology to enhance teaching and learning, innovative teaching strategies to design and modify instruction.
  •  

    B E 5565 - Curriculum Development in Business and Marketing Education (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides students with understanding of principles for curriculum design, development, and implementation in business and marketing education. The content focuses on contemporary curriculum design and implementation strategies, a discussion of curriculum development for school-to- work transition, formulation of specific curriculum goals and objectives, identification and selection of relevant curriculum materials, and systematic assessment of the business and marketing education curriculum.
  •  

    B E 5575 - Analysis of Teaching Practices in Business and Marketing Education (2)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides students with an opportunity to conduct an original and unique action research project in an educational setting. Students will examine interactions in the classroom through in- depth observation and analysis of teaching practices, conduct a survey of literature, and apply action research methodology in workforce development areas such as business and marketing education.

Career & Technical Education

  •  

    CTE 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    CTE 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Subject matter may vary from term to term depending on student interest and need. A student may enroll more than once in a selected topics course provided that the content does not duplicate that of the previous course.
  •  

    CTE 5619 - Curriculum Development in Career and Technical Education (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides students with understanding of principles for curriculum design, development, and implementation in career and technical education subjects. The content focuses on contemporary curriculum design and implementation strategies, a discussion of curriculum development for school-to-work transition, formulation of specific curriculum goals and objectives, identification and selection of relevant curriculum materials, and systematic assessment of the career and technical education curriculum.
  •  

    CTE 5650 - Research in Career and Technical Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides students with an opportunity to conduct original and unique research in the field of career and technical education. Students will conduct research and design and develop an original project in their specific area of study based on the specific content area skills they have developed in their previous coursework.
  •  

    CTE 5660 - Advanced Methods in Teaching Career and Technical Education (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides students advanced methodology and classroom strategies in career and technical education fields of study. It places emphasis on current issues such as: best pedagogical practices for career and technical education subjects taught within the school setting, emerging learning environments in which all learners can be successful, assessment appropriate to diverse learners, use of technology to enhance teaching and learning, innovative teaching strategies to design and modify instruction.

Curriculum & Instruction

  •  

    C I 5010 - Evidence-Based Practice in Early Childhood Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    This course will examine the meaning of evidence-based practice as it applies in early childhood education and intervention, with the goal of preparing students to become critical consumers of research. Students will review current literature concerning evidence-based practices for early childhood settings and explore ways to apply research findings in their professional practice across a variety of settings (e.g., school, home, intervention agency).
    (Same as FCS 5010 /SPE 5010 .)
  •  

    C I 5020 - Early Intervention (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Odd-numbered years
    This course will acquaint students with federal legislation pertaining to early intervention (EI) and examine multiple ways that early intervention (EI) professionals provide services in a variety of settings (e.g., home, child care facilities, schools, agencies, and community settings such as parks and grocery stores). Characteristics and needs associated with specific disabilities will be addressed as well as strategies to individualize services for children and their families.
    (Same as FCS 5020 /SPE 5020 .)
  •  

    C I 5040 - Teacher as Researcher (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course provides an opportunity for practitioners to explore, using systematic observations and reflection, an area of interest in their professional practice. Teachers will research and solve specific problems in educational settings. The ultimate goal is that the inquiry conducted by the student should lead to an improvement in practice and to an increased understanding of the issues, both theoretical and practical, that arise in the course of conducting research.
    (Same as RES 5040 /RES 5040 /SPE 5040 .)
  •  

    C I 5041 - Assessment to Improve Learning and Inform Teaching (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course, designed for classroom teachers, focuses on the evaluation of student performance to improve teaching and learning. Teachers will examine the theoretical foundations of assessment and evaluation and investigate research-based assessment practices. They will apply this knowledge to select and design assessments that meet curriculum goals and elicit quality student work, interpret assessment data, evaluate student learning, and identify implications for teaching. Teachers will develop their leadership skills in the area of assessment by facilitating collaborative analysis of student work with a team of educators to foster improved student learning in their classrooms and schools.
  •  

    C I 5045 - Advanced Topics in Diversity (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A framework of theories on diversity and multicultural issues is constructed in this course. From these theories, practical applications will be derived. Research focusing on creating productive and equitable learning environments, on best practices collaboration, and on instructional accommodations and modifications will be examined.
    (Same as SPE 5045 .)
  •  

    C I 5050 - Supervision of Instruction (2-3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the nature and function of supervision, recent trends, teacher involvement in policy formation, the organization and techniques used in supervision.
  •  

    C I 5055 - Connecting Learners and Subject Matter (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course connects the examination of curriculum foundations and models of the school learner and educational goals with an intense study of research-based, exemplary instructional strategies focused on learning and achievement. Primary focus is on: 1) organizing, implementing, and evaluating school curriculum; 2) implementing, reflecting on, and evaluating instructional planning; and 3) integrating technology for meaningful learning.
  •  

    C I 5060 - Curriculum Planning (2-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A study of principles, effective practices, and techniques appropriate for overall curriculum planning.
  •  

    C I 5070 - Advanced Study in Elementary School Mathematics (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Elementary teachers will build on their content knowledge of elementary school mathematics while examining content and pedagogy through the lens of a practicing teacher. They will explore and implement specific research-based pedagogy to deepen their pedagogical content knowledge. Topics will include comparative analyses of state and national curriculum standards, research-based best practice, authentic assessment, and subject matter integration.
  •  

    C I 5075 - Advanced Study in Elementary School Science (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Advanced Study in Elementary School Science is designed for elementary teachers or specialists who wish to further develop their content knowledge and critically examine existing pedagogical practices. The course focuses on the understanding of scientific concepts and principles; interdisciplinary planning and implementation; infusion of community resources and local funding into the elementary science program; and contemporary issues specific to the teaching, learning, and evaluation of science curricula.
  •  

    C I 5080 - Advanced Study in Elementary School Social Studies (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Designed for elementary teachers to build on their content knowledge about the social studies (including history, political science, and geography). Includes analysis of ideological views about the purpose of the social studies, current issues in social studies, and on-going debates about social studies curriculum standards at the national and state levels. Specific topics will include research-based teaching strategies, connecting learners to social studies content, developing in-depth subject matter integration, social studies for social justice, and advocating for the social studies.
  •  

    C I 5085 - Teaching High School Mathematics (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course prepares prospective secondary Mathematics teachers to understand effective mathematics curricula based on national, state, and program standards, and to implement effective instruction and assessment in grades 8-12. Major topics include current research in mathematics education, understanding abilities of diverse learners, Instructional strategies (including interpreting secondary mathematics content for learners), applying instructional technology, assessing learning, and secondary classroom management. An instructional design plan (IDP) is created and at least two lessons from that IDP are taught to students during the internship. Students will have an internship experience in public school classrooms. It is strongly advised that all other requirements for licensure (except student teaching) be completed prior to the methods course.
    [Dual-listed with CI 4085.]
  •  

    C I 5111 - Advanced Developmental Assessment and Program Evaluation for Children (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to provide students with skills and knowledge in assessing the development of children, and the interests, concerns, and priorities of families. Students will collect data for the purpose of monitoring children’s progress, family outcomes, and program effectiveness.
    (Same as FCS 5111 /SPE 5111 .)
  •  

    C I 5112 - Advanced Developmental Curriculum and Instruction for Young Children (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to provide students with advanced skills and knowledge in application of a research base to design, adapt and evaluate curriculum and environments suitable for the integration of infants, toddlers, preschool and kindergarten children of various developmental levels and abilities in inclusive settings.
    (Same as FCS 5112 /SPE 5112 .)
  •  

    C I 5113 - Seminar: Issues in Birth through Kindergarten Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This seminar is designed to build leadership skills to enable the student to consult and collaborate with other professionals. It will permit the development of depth and breadth in professional growth as well, and provide the foundation for life-long learning for the advancement of knowledge in the field of early childhood education and early intervention.
    (Same as FCS 5113 /SPE 5113 .)
  •  

    C I 5130 - Recent Trends and Issues in Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Designed for elementary teachers to deepen their understanding of significant issues and trends in education at both the national and international levels. Specific topics include: current debates about assessment and high stakes testing; research in comparative education; the health status of children; and analysis of current issues affecting school, family and community relationships.
  •  

    C I 5150 - Organizing and Planning Student Teaching (2)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of the origin and development of student teaching, including present status and trends, experiences prior to student teaching, selection of schools and supervising teachers, selection and placement of student teachers.
  •  

    C I 5160 - Supervision of Student Teaching (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of general techniques of a supervising teacher, including observation, guiding student teachers in planning, orientation of student teachers, student teacher participation, and evaluation. Available as a workshop by invitation.
  •  

    C I 5200 - Multi-Media/Image Production (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course offers the student opportunities to develop the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills necessary to plan, design, produce, and present multi-image presentations. Presentation formats range from analog and digital sound and multi-image formats to various analog and digital projection and dissemination programs.
  •  

    C I 5230 - Studies in Applied Instructional Strategies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed for instructional leaders in K-12 buildings. It provides an intense study of research-based, exemplary practice instructional strategies focused on learning and achievement. Special emphasis is placed on the research knowledge-base for learning, cognitive instructional strategies, exemplary instructional planning, reflection and evaluation of instruction, and integrating technology for meaningful learning.
  •  

    C I 5310 - New Media and Emerging Literacies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course requires students to analyze and evaluate the role of new media, technologies, and literacies for individuals, societies, and cultures. Emphasis is placed on understanding the form and language of a variety of texts, including print and non-print. Students develop perspectives regarding the socio-cultural contexts of media production, dissemination, consumption, interpretation, and effects, including an examination of media representations in both local and global contexts. Students will synthesize theoretical knowledge of literacies by using and creating with new media and technologies for multiple audiences and perspectives.
  •  

    C I 5500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    C I 5525 - Product of Learning (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    C I 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Subject matter may vary from term to term depending on student interest and need. A student may enroll more than once in a selected topics course provided that the content does not duplicate that of the previous course. (Limit of six hours credit.)
  •  

    C I 5550 - Successful Schools for Young Adolescents (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is a comprehensive study of the middle school philosophy, the middle school movement, and the essential components of middle level organization and schooling. The course focuses on the developmental characteristics of young adolescents and the implications of those characteristics for middle level schooling. Other topics include: an historical study of elementary schools that include the middle grades, junior high schools, and middle schools; current trends and issues in middle level education; the middle level knowledge base; major organizational issues; the roles of teachers; and the future of middle level education.
  •  

    C I 5551 - Creativity (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A course to discover activities, skills and talents in the fostering of creativity. Emphasis will be given to readings and to designing models for programming creativity in the classroom.
  •  

    C I 5552 - Advanced Video Production (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course will give students the opportunity to engage in the professional video production process as they create a video program for a client or for their portfolio. Students will learn skills in pre-production planning, production and post-production editing, and they will also learn to operate and maintain professional quality equipment. Additionally, as they act as crew on one another’s projects and critique one another’s work, students will learn to be a part of a video production team. Emphasis in this course is placed on thorough and creative planning, collaborative production and a progressive step-by-step approach to post-production.
    Prerequisite: C I 5840  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    C I 5576 - Advanced Diagnostic-Prescriptive Teaching (4)


    When Offered: Spring
    Rationale, operational models, techniques used on the implementation of the diagnostic-prescriptive approach. Supervised field experiences in the actual diagnostic-prescriptive approach.
  •  

    C I 5581 - Advanced Curriculum Design (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The physiological and psychological basis of learning. Curriculum development for various exceptionalities and the rationale and development to meet their needs.
  •  

    C I 5585 - Teacher Leadership and School Improvement (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to help teachers develop an understanding of and skill in assuming leadership roles and responsibilities in their schools. Those aspects of school leadership seen as most appropriate and potentially beneficial for teacher involvement will be emphasized. Particular attention is paid to the relationships among teacher leadership, school improvement, and site- based accountability. Students will have the opportunity to acquire knowledge and skills and formulate their own approaches through both university-based classroom and site-based clinical activities. Activities such as participant- observations, shadow-studies classroom-action research, problem-based learning, case studies, survey research, and qualitative research studies can be included. Students will be expected to present tangible evidence that represents, authentically, their professional growth.
  •  

    C I 5591 - Advanced Curriculum Design in Elementary Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An examination of curriculum foundations and models as related to understanding the nature of the elementary school learner and educational goals. Primary focus is on organizing, implementing and evaluating the elementary school curriculum. Includes investigation of recent research in elementary education as applied to curriculum and the classroom setting.
  •  

    C I 5630 - Instructional Technology (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The course is intended to introduce students to the field of instructional technology including its theoretical and practical components. Students are introduced to traditional and emerging electronic communication systems and equipment, and consider the application such technology may have whether in education, business or industry. Particular attention is given to the instructional design process with emphasis placed on the relationship between the inception of a program or technology and the actual instructional application and implementation of it.
  •  

    C I 5635 - Media Literacy and Program Development (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    In this course, students examine the historical and current challenges and opportunities in media literacy program development, focusing on both national and international examples in school–‐based and other settings. Educational institutions and other settings are analyzed in terms of the way their organizational culture and characteristics impact media literacy as an innovation. Students are required to formulate a rationale and design a program or programmatic change that links media literacy to a professional area of interest relevant to the student’s career goals.
    Prerequisites: C I 5830  and C I 5940.
  •  

    C I 5636 - Emerging Issues and Trends in Media and Technology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Focuses on trends and developments in educational media, technology, and media literacy. Students will address contemporary issues, trends, controversies, and techniques. Topics may vary from year to year; repeatable for up to nine semester hours.
  •  

    C I 5641 - Media and Management (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides a broad background in management theory and practice. Emphasis is placed on how to manage media effectively and efficiently within an organizational context (school, industry, etc.) with particular attention given to the utilization of resources including personnel, budget, hardware, and the work environment. Strategies are discussed that enable media to be effectively utilized in order to solve training and corporate communication problems.
  •  

    C I 5642 - Introduction to Web Page Design and Development for Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course introduces the student to a range of digital tools for the design and production of web based education and information design. This class includes web page development and design, digital graphics, visual design, animation, and issues concerning information design, service, site management and a review of current research on effective instructional design for web based learning environments.
  •  

    C I 5643 - Advanced Production and Portfolio (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This is a required individual study course which serves as a synthesis production and presentation experience, involving close faculty supervision and a client/consultant relationship. Included in the course is a Comprehensive Major Project which will be client oriented and the preparation of a production portfolio suitable for professional presentation.
  •  

    C I 5650 - Middle Level Instruction and Assessment (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides an in-depth examination of assessment-driven instruction for young adolescents. Multiple forms and types of assessments that increase young adolescent learning will be investigated and applied. Evidences of young adolescent learning will be collected and analyzed to inform instructional decisions. Essential understandings grounded in young adolescents’ questions about the world will guide instructional design. Models of instructional design that teach for understanding, including instructional decision-making related to research-verified practices, are emphasized.
  •  

    C I 5700 - History of Instructional Technology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A broad background and understanding of contemporary instructional technologies, processes and systems is provided. Readings and research from 450 BC to the present with emphasis on theoretical and methodological foundations for media research are examined.
  •  

    C I 5740 - Photography and Digital Imaging (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Basic theory, principles, and techniques of photography and digital imaging.
  •  

    C I 5750 - Teaching Diverse Young Adolescents (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course focuses on issues relevant to teaching young adolescents of varied backgrounds and abilities. Special attention will be given to developmentally and culturally responsive instruction and management of diverse classrooms. The various factors that influence young adolescent learning and development and how they impact teaching and learning will be investigated. Critical reflection and challenge of current practices related to diverse young adolescents in classrooms, schools, and communities will be fostered.
  •  

    C I 5770 - Intermediate Photography and Digital Imaging (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An intermediate photographic production course which strengthens previously acquired skills in photography and provides advanced work in digital imaging.
  •  

    C I 5800 - Logistics of Mediated Programs and Presentations (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Hard data and facts for programmers and presenters from facilities planning to effective showmanship are examined. The application of hardware and software for teaching and training are located against the institutional environment and contexts in which a presentation takes place.
  •  

    C I 5810 - Introduction to Sight and Sound (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An introduction to the basic knowledge and skills underlying any effective audiovisual presentation. Students will have the opportunity to learn the aural and visual aesthetic principles involved in the creation of effective media presentations. They will also have the opportunity to learn the theory and operation of various common sight and sound devices, including microphones, digital audio recorders, and digital audio editing software; still cameras, and digital image editing software; video cameras and digital video editing tools; and projection devices and presentation systems. Emphasis will be placed not only on understanding how the equipment works, but on the common theoretical background shared by all these communication devices.
  •  

    C I 5825 - Non-fiction Film and Video (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Students view and analyze a variety of non-fiction films and videos in terms of both form and content. Emphasis is placed on understanding the wide range of purposes for which non-fiction programs are made, and on examining the variety of techniques used to achieve those purposes. Students also engage in some hands-on experiences attempting to capture reality on videotape as part of an effort to explore what happens to reality when it is shaped into a film or video.
  •  

    C I 5830 - Media Literacy (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    The course examines what it means to be literate in the technological world of the twenty‐first century where digital media pervades our daily experiences. Key concepts and principles from the field of media literacy are studied through an examination of movies, advertising, television, journalism and news, the Internet, and social media. Emphasis is placed on understanding media texts, media industries, media narratives, and the form and language of a variety of different media. Students are provided with critical frameworks for analyzing media of all forms as well as with tools and techniques applied in several class projects aimed at deconstructing media messages.
  •  

    C I 5835 - Media Influence and Identity Across Cultures (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This media literacy course concentrates on media representations, media audiences, and media effects, including the sociocultural, spatial, and geographic contexts of media consumption and production. Media ranging from mass media to local/global media to social media are studied in terms of their depiction and representations of individuals, institutions, identities, issues, and places. Key categories of exploration include examining identity and media representations of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, etc. across a variety of media forms and global/local contexts.
  •  

    C I 5840 - Beginning Video Production (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is a basic introduction to the creative and technical skills needed to produce effective, low-budget video programs on location. Students will use the department’s digital cameras and non-linear computer editing system to learn how to express themselves clearly in a wide variety of programming formats through the language of video. Students will gain experience in each of the three stages in the production process: pre-production, production, and post-production.
  •  

    C I 5845 - Global Perspectives in Media and Technology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course requires students to analyze and evaluate the roles media and technology play in shaping individuals, communities, cultures, and civic engagement throughout the world. Media literacy will be integrated throughout the course as a critical perspective through which to study global issues and ideas. Students will explore how media and technology support or subvert opportunities for networking, participation, discourse, and action related to a range of local and global issues, including environmental issues. As part of this course, students may engage in global collaboration with international students studying abroad and/or locally. Students will synthesize new understandings and perspectives for how media and technology may be impacting conceptions of physical and digital communities and how they shape local and global relationships, issues, ideas, and ideologies.
  •  

    C I 5850 - Middle Level Curriculum (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course examines models of curriculum and processes of curriculum design that are responsive to the needs of young adolescents. Educators examine major middle level curriculum theories, historical contexts of curriculum development, traditional and innovative middle level curriculum models, implications of 21st Century teaching and learning, and trends and issues that reflect research and successful practice.
  •  

    C I 5860 - Audio Documentary Production (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    In this course, students listen to and analyze a variety of non-fiction audio programs in terms of both form and content. Emphasis is placed on understanding the wide range of purposes for which non-fiction programs are made, and on examining the variety of techniques used to achieve those purposes. The class will explore the advantages and disadvantages of creating and distributing documentaries in an audio format. Students also engage in some hands-on experiences creating sound documentaries using a variety of digital audio hardware and software. The short audio documentaries produced by each member of the class will be podcast.
  •  

    C I 5880 - Educational Regulations and Policies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines key issues that govern daily and long-range decisions of educational leaders. The course focuses on understanding North Carolina and federal codes, policies, and significant precedent and will emphasize analysis of concepts such as finance, personnel, risk management, curriculum, student services, teacher rights, torts, student rights, and access.
  •  

    C I 5900 - Internship/Practicum (1-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Provides direct experiences teaching in grades Kindergarten through nine. Students are required to spend 90 hours teaching in classrooms appropriate to the level(s) of licensure sought. This internship/practicum is designed only for those without appropriate experience in their Master of Arts major, as determined by the students’ academic advisory committees.
  •  

    C I 5910 - Applied Curriculum Specialist Skills (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course offers site-based experiences of leadership and management for prospective curriculum specialists. Students will be placed with competent administrative/supervisory personnel and will observe, participate in, and evaluate curriculum issues existing in public schools, public school systems, or other appropriate agencies along with attending class to explore issues and applications of curriculum specialist standards.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    C I 5921 - Instructional Design (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Analysis and application of systematic strategies for the identification of instructional needs, design of instructional system models to meet educational goals in both K-12 education and business, and evaluation of instructional systems.
  •  

    C I 5922 - Number Systems and Operations: K-5 Mathematical Tasks (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Analysis and construction of effective mathematical tasks in teaching number systems and operations at the K-5 level; attention is also given to the expansion of content knowledge.
  •  

    C I 5923 - Geometry & Spatial Visualization: K-5 Assessment (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Formative and summative assessment strategies of students’ geometric thinking in elementary grades; concept development of 2- and 3-dimensional geometry. Attention also given to diagnosis of student errors. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: C I 5922 .
  •  

    C I 5924 - Algebraic Reasoning: K-5 Discourse & Questioning (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Focus on the early algebra concepts of functional thinking and generalized arithmetic in relationship to pedagogical practices centered on questioning in the mathematics classroom. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: C I 5922 .
  •  

    C I 5925 - Data Analysis and Measurement: K-5 Classroom Interactions (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Focus on statistical literacy of elementary teachers and the teaching of data analysis and measurement to K-5 students; attention is also given to learning methods which facilitate appropriate classroom interactions. Does not count for the Master of Arts in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: C I 5922 .
  •  

    C I 5926 - Rational Numbers and Operations: K-5 Learning Trajectories (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Focus on rational number concepts through learning trajectories at the K-5 level; attention also given to problem solving and content knowledge.
    Prerequisite: C I 5922 .
  •  

    C I 5927 - Mathematical Modeling: K-5 Leadership (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Generating mathematical representations and making explicit connections between concepts. Pedagogy designed to equip elementary teachers to become mathematics teacher-leaders in school settings; focus given to topics integrated within mathematical strands.
    Prerequisites: C I 5922 , C I 5923 /MAT 5923 , C I 5924 /MAT 5924 , C I 5925 /MAT 5925 , and C I 5926 .
  •  

    C I 5930 - Instructional Graphics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Examination of basic design principles and concepts in the selection, design, and evaluation of graphic materials. Course includes laboratory experience in design, development, production, and publication of graphical materials. The laboratory experience centers on the use of microcomputers and associated input or output devices.
  •  

    C I 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  •  

    C I 5999 - Thesis (4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    C I 6050 - Critical Perspectives and Research in New Media and Literacies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will position students as scholarly professionals, leaders, and researchers in the theoretical, critical, aesthetic, and practical dimensions of information communication technologies, emerging literacies, and new media. Students will investigate theory and research across the areas of communication studies, literacy studies, technology education, and sustainability as they relate to new media and emerging technologies. Using qualitative methodologies- specifically arts-based research and visual ethnography- students will examine the artistic/aesthetic, technical, social, cultural, political, economic, and environmental dimensions of media and technology as they develop perspectives on new media, technologies, and literacies that will inform their future research, advocacy, and leadership.
  •  

    C I 6160 - Field Study in Curriculum Problems (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Students develop a conceptual framework based on general system theory for guiding, developing, and evaluating school curriculum improvements. Students conduct a research project analyzing the design and development of school curriculum planning with emphasis on current trends and issues in elementary school curriculum (K-9).
  •  

    C I 6310 - Analysis of the Teaching Process (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Examination of the teacher-pupil and pupil-pupil interaction in the classroom through study of original relevant research disciplines concerning human behavior and society. Special attention is given to the efforts of teacher approaches to children, the organization of curriculum materials and the structure of the classroom society on the accomplishment of education objectives.
  •  

    C I 6360 - Survey of Research and Implications for Curriculum and Instruction (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course emphasizes the reading and interpretation of research on designated topics within the school curriculum. Through collaboration and dialogue among class members, resulting implications for classroom instruction are determined.
  •  

    C I 6460 - Issues, Trends, and Problems in Curriculum, K-9 (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Analysis of current practices, problems, and trends in education with emphasis on improved programs.
  •  

    C I 6500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    C I 6530-6549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Consideration of group and individual investigations in education.
  •  

    C I 6999 - Education Specialist Thesis (1-6)


    When Offered: Fall
  •  

    C I 7130 - Investigations into Curriculum and Instruction Problems (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Investigation into curriculum and instruction problems is a course taken during the student’s public school internship. The aim of this course is to provide those who have an intense interest in curriculum and instruction with an opportunity for practical application of knowledge and skills obtained from the research core, along with an opportunity to work with faculty who are researching problems.
  •  

    C I 7131 - Emerging Issues in Curriculum and Instruction (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Within the context of educational leadership, the purpose of this course is to provide doctoral level students with an in-depth understanding of issues, problems, and trends in curriculum and instruction at the local, state and national levels. The course is also aimed at providing students with experiences which lead to an understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of problem setting, problem solving, and policy analysis in curriculum and instruction.
  •  

    C I 7132 - Reflective Supervision of Curriculum and Instruction (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The focus of this course is on the situation-specific application of knowledge to problems in supervision. The course has two foci. First, the practical problems of supervision as they relate to teaching and implementing the curriculum at the school system, school building, and classroom levels are targeted. The second outcome is the development of a reflective practitioner who understands and approaches supervision in a deliberative manner.
  •  

    C I 7989 - Doctoral Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing doctoral research.

Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership

edl.appstate.edu

Audrey Dentith, Program Director 
dentitham@appstate.edu

The Doctor of Education degree (Ed.D.) in Educational Leadership is designed for potential and practicing educational leaders who wish to develop and refine their leadership capabilities in educational organizations. The goals of the program include:

  • to introduce students to the methodologies of critical analysis of educational theory and practices;
  • to engage students in disciplined inquiry in the field of education;
  • to prepare students for making contributions to educational theory and practice; and,
  • to prepare students to become leaders in the diverse world in which educational institutions exist.

The program requires a minimum of 60 semester hours beyond the student’s master’s degree. All students must take at least 48 semester hours of doctoral coursework (or a combination of doctoral coursework and approved Ed.S. courses), which includes: 36 s.h. of required core courses; two semesters of EDL 7900 , Internship (3+3) to total 6 s.h.; and two consecutive semesters of EDL 7999 , Dissertation (3+3) for a minimum of 6 s.h. The 12 semester hours in each concentration will be chosen by the student in consultation with an advisor and/or the Program Director. The 12 semester hours in the concentrations may be comprised of required courses for licensure, a set of related graduate-level courses, or a set of approved interdisciplinary courses.

Students who hold the Education Specialist from Appalachian: Students who hold an earned Ed.S. degree from Appalachian State will be exempt from 24 - 30 semester hours of course work in the doctoral program. A student who holds an Ed.S. from a regionally accredited university may be exempt from up to 30 credit hours of coursework in the doctoral program. The exemption is not automatic. Specific Ed.S. coursework that might substitute for doctoral coursework will be identified after evaluation of eligible courses by the Program Director. All other degree requirements remain in effect. For further information on exemptions, contact the program director.

Qualifying Exam: The Qualifying Exam is required after the student has completed the 36 semester hours of required course work. The purpose of the Qualifying Examination is to enable students to continue the process that leads to the dissertation stage of the program.

Admission to Candidacy: Admission to candidacy to the Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership occurs only after successful completion of the Qualifying Exam and Dissertation Proposal. Students may not begin dissertation research until admission to candidacy is approved.

Location of Program: This program is offered on campus in Boone in the format described in this Bulletin. Off-campus cohorts are started periodically, require that the applicants hold the Ed.S. from Appalachian, and follow a part-time extended program format. For information on upcoming off-campus cohorts, please contact the Office of Distance Education: distance.appstate.edu.

Programs

Doctor of Education

Dual Degree Programs

Courses

Educational Leadership

  •  

    EDL 7011 - Multi-Disciplinary Seminar on Emerging Issues I (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A multi-disciplinary seminar to examine current and emerging issues in society and their impact on public education. The course draws upon readings from a variety of disciplines for students to examine and to reflectively explore fundamental questions about: the nature and purpose of education; how educators conceive of and understand teaching and learning in schools and classrooms; and how educational leaders conceive of and understand the complex relations between schools, teachers, learners, and curriculum.
  •  

    EDL 7012 - Multi-Disciplinary Seminar on Emerging Issues II (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A continuation of EDL 7011 . This seminar will feature different professional disciplines in developing an understanding of the context of public school administration. The seminar will include comprehensive treatments of how leaders use information in shaping and communicating their vision and values throughout organizations. Students will be expected to assume more responsibility for building responses to issues presented in this seminar.
  •  

    EDL 7020 - Organizational and Systems Theory (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will integrate essential features of research in organizational theory with the more recent developments in systems theory. How people and groups organize to accomplish tasks will be combined with how organizations combine to form systems. A special feature of the course will be its treatment of organizations and systems for public, non-profit enterprises. Models and case studies will be featured.
  •  

    EDL 7025 - Leadership in Organizations (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Brings into coherent form the application of leadership principles to organizations. Leadership is seen as the mechanism for putting both organizational and system theories into action, to enhance school environments, and to sustain structures for change. Extensive use of case studies will be featured.
  •  

    EDL 7030 - Concepts and Constructs in Curriculum and Instruction (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Designed to explore and critically examine the structure, concepts, issues and decisions underlying curriculum and instructional thought as practiced in public schools. Instruction will utilize a polyfocal conspectus, study of cases, simulation, and juris prudential experiences. Included in the products used to evaluate student performance are: development of cases, impact statements, literature reviews, and similar projects.
  •  

    EDL 7040 - Educational Organizations and Technology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Students in this course will develop strategies for forming and implementing a vision for incorporating computer and communications technologies into educational settings. They will have an opportunity, as current and future educational leaders, to investigate examples of these technologies in schools and other educational settings. These experiences, combined with appropriate leadership skills, will enable current and future educational leaders to successfully plan for and implement computer and communications technologies into their respective educational settings.
  •  

    EDL 7050 - School Finance and Business Administration (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Designed to examine current practices in public finance. Emphasis will be placed on the funding for public schools, and the relationship of that funding to the support for other public and private agencies. Demographics and political trends will be used to project funding needs for planning purposes. The course also examines the application of current management practices to the business administration function of public school administration. Particular emphasis is placed on the relationship between facilities planning and funding practices in public education.
  •  

    EDL 7065 - Writing for the Professional Educator (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed for professional educators seeking to gain knowledge and skill in using writing effectively as a major component of leadership and management in educational settings. Topics include understanding the writing process in professional settings, tailoring messages for audience and purpose, using different forms of writing in the profession, applying technology tools for writing, and understanding the relationship between writing and speaking in developing communication effectiveness as a leader.
  •  

    EDL 7099 - Professional Seminar (1)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The purpose of this seminar is to provide doctoral students an opportunity to discuss topics arising from course work; to report on internships and research assistantships; and to explore possible dissertation topics. Individual faculty and faculty panels will, from time to time, join the seminar to discuss their research. Seminar students will develop a portfolio reflecting the development of dissertation topics. The portfolio will provide students a means by which they can present evidence of their progress for consideration by advisors and other faculty. Students should expect to maintain the portfolio throughout their course work.
  •  

    EDL 7110 - Survey of Research Methodologies in Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course provides students with the requisite skills for reading and understanding contemporary research in education, and examining researchers’ motivations for selecting particular research and assessment methodologies. The course will acquaint students with the wide variety of sources of research journals; to a variety of available databases; to a variety of available measurement and assessment instruments; and to a wide range of methodological applications in education. The research examples will be from the wide area of educational leadership.
  •  

    EDL 7120 - Advanced Tests and Measurements (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Familiarize advanced graduate students with the techniques of instrument construction and validation and with the analysis of scores obtained from psychometric instruments. Techniques for designing survey instruments and tests of achievement and the analysis of the results of interest and personality inventories and other mental measurements will be covered.
    Prerequisite: EDL 7110  or equivalent.
  •  

    EDL 7130 - Multivariate Statistics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Emphasizes the use of statistical tools to organize and analyze large and complex data bases using multiple correlation, factor analysis, cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, and trend analysis techniques.
    Prerequisite: EDL 7110  or equivalent.
  •  

    EDL 7150 - Inferential Statistics (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Deals with the application of parametric and non- parametric techniques in hypothesis testing and other inferential situations. The course includes some basic hypothesis testing theory, as well as theory involving various well known types of distributions of data. Students will have the opportunity to learn techniques for determining probability estimates in hypothesis testing and will also be required to use the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) in hypothesis testing tasks using SPSS/PC+ Studentware.
    Prerequisites: a background in statistics, EDL 7110  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    EDL 7160 - Qualitative Research Methods (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course emphasizes qualitative methods of data analysis and collection and how they can be compared and contrasted to quantitative research. Students will be expected to learn a variety of observational methods and interview techniques. Selecting from these methods, students will design and implement their own research projects. This course will emphasize the process of producing and interpreting qualitative research by critically examining the intricate relationships between theories, hypotheses, variables, and data.
    Prerequisites are an introductory course in tests and measurements, an introductory descriptive statistics course, and a course in inferential statistics.
  •  

    EDL 7165 - Quantitative Approaches in Non-Experimental Studies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course provides students the requisite skills and experiences in non-experimental research design to allow the critical examination of non-experimental studies and the design of studies like those that will be typically appropriate to educational and institutional settings. The course will provide students with an understanding of the adaptation of correlational and experimental models to research settings and data sets that do not fit experimental assumptions. A wide variety of examples from the professional literature will be reviewed and students will engage in the design of studies.
    Prerequisites: EDL 7110  and completion of the EDL Doctoral Program statistical prerequisite.
  •  

    EDL 7170 - Program Evaluation and Policy Analysis (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides a broad survey of educational evaluation theory and practice, and the relationship of evaluation to educational policy analysis, along with practical experience in designing educational evaluations and policy studies. The course begins with an examination of the historical underpinnings of educational evaluation and policy analysis, their role in improving education, their points of distinction from other forms of systematic inquiry, and the origins of the variety of alternative conceptions of evaluation and policy analysis in practice today. This examination is followed by an in-depth study of a variety of evaluation and policy analysis models.
  •  

    EDL 7180 - Advanced Qualitative Research in Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course provides students with advanced knowledge (i.e., the theoretical bases) and skills in qualitative research. Advanced-level analysis and interpretation, linked with the theoretical underpinnings of both general qualitative research and the doctoral student’s particular preferred method, will be a central focus of this course. Individual attention will be given to the students, to the extent possible. Honing of the student’s writing (i.e., presentation/ representation of a qualitative study) will also be a prominent aspect of this course. Students will undertake a small-scale qualitative study in this course in order to concretize and apply the concepts and practice the skills learned.
  •  

    EDL 7190 - Research Design in Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to provide doctoral students with an in-depth analysis of the methods and procedures of research in education. Topics will include conceptualizing educational research, writing research proposals, constructing measurement instruments, collecting and analyzing qualitative and quantitative data, and drawing inferences. Students who successfully complete the course will be able to make proper decisions regarding appropriate designs and methods for investigating different research questions, and will be able to plan and implement a research project for their dissertations.
  •  

    EDL 7500 - Independent Study (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    EDL 7530-7549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    EDL 7900 - Internship (3-6)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The internship is a full-year experience under the co-sponsorship of an appropriate educational agency and Appalachian State University. The student will engage in activities designed to bring the relationship of theory and practice into clear focus. Attendance at seminars on campus will be required.
  •  

    EDL 7989 - Doctoral Research (1-9)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing doctoral research.
  •  

    EDL 7999 - Dissertation (1-9)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Students must complete a minimum of 6 s.h. to satisfy the Ed.D. degree requirements. Students are advised to register for 3 s.h. for two consecutive semesters to complete requirements. If requirements are not complete at this time, students will continue to register for a minimum of 1 s.h. until the dissertation is complete.

Department of Family and Child Studies

fcs.appstate.edu

Denise Brewer, Interim Chair
brewerdm@appstate.edu

Programs

Graduate Minor

Courses

Family & Child Studies

  •  

    FCS 5001 - Orientation to Research in Family and Consumer Sciences (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Orientation to and examination of research methodologies, collection and analyses of data, and preparation of reports.
    Prerequisites: any undergraduate statistics course including ECO 2100 (Business and Economic Statistics I), STT 2810 (Introduction to Statistics) or STT 3820 (Statistical Methods I), or RES 4600/RES 5600 , or equivalent.
  •  

    FCS 5002 - Family and Consumer Sciences Perspectives and Integrative Frameworks (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An examination of professional roles and behaviors, issues and trends, professional practice and ethics, and philosophical base of family and consumer sciences.
  •  

    FCS 5010 - Evidence-Based Practice in Early Childhood Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    This course will examine the meaning of evidence-based practice as it applies in early childhood education and intervention, with the goal of preparing students to become critical consumers of research. Students will review current literature concerning evidence-based practices for early childhood settings and explore ways to apply research findings in their professional practice across a variety of settings (e.g., school, home, intervention agency).
    (Same as C I 5010 /SPE 5010 .)
  •  

    FCS 5020 - Early Intervention (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Odd-numbered years
    This course will acquaint students with federal legislation pertaining to early intervention (EI) and examine multiple ways that early intervention (EI) professionals provide services in a variety of settings (e.g., home, child care facilities, schools, agencies, and community settings such as parks and grocery stores). Characteristics and needs associated with specific disabilities will be addressed as well as strategies to individualize services for children and their families.
    (Same as C I 5020 /SPE 5020 .)
  •  

    FCS 5100 - Application and Theories of Child Development (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    Consideration of selected meanings, definitions, and functions of theories of child development as related to practical application of these theories to program planning and implementation for preschool children in home and group settings.
  •  

    FCS 5111 - Advanced Developmental Assessment and Program Evaluation for Children (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Odd-numbered years
    This course is designed to provide students with skills and knowledge in assessing the development of children, and the interests, concerns, and priorities of families. Students will collect data for the purpose of monitoring children’s progress, family outcomes, and program effectiveness.
    (Same as CI 5111/SPE 5111.)
  •  

    FCS 5112 - Advanced Developmental Curriculum and Instruction for Young Children (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    This course is designed to provide students with advanced skills and knowledge in application of a research base to design, adapt and evaluate curriculum and environments suitable for the integration of infants, toddlers, preschool and kindergarten children of various developmental levels and abilities in inclusive settings.
    (Same as C I 5112 /SPE 5112 .)
  •  

    FCS 5113 - Seminar: Issues in Birth through Kindergarten Education (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Even-numbered years
    This seminar is designed to build leadership skills to enable the student to consult and collaborate with other professionals. It will permit the development of depth and breadth in professional growth as well, and provide the foundation for life-long learning for the advancement of knowledge in the field of early childhood education and early intervention.
    (Same as C I 5113 /SPE 5113 .)
  •  

    FCS 5140 - Family-Professional Partnerships in Birth Through Kindergarten Education (3)


    When Offered: F.Even-numbered years.
    This course is designed to focus on major issues in the field of family studies and to understand the unique role of professionals who will be working in collaborative partnerships with families to promote positive outcomes for young children and their families. Students will incorporate existing research and current technology to develop a plan to assist families and children to reach their educational goals through family advocacy. Students will use this material to work directly with a family and develop a research-based presentation for class.
  •  

    FCS 5305 - Recent Issues in Housing and Interiors (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of recent issues in housing and interiors.
    Prerequisite: FCS 1300 (Housing Environments) or equivalent.
  •  

    FCS 5310 - Historic Housing and Renovation (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of historical houses and their renovation for contemporary living.
  •  

    FCS 5315 - Housing for the Elderly (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An overview of housing for the elderly including housing needs, available housing, accommodations, housing dissatisfactions, attitudes toward living arrangements, housing standards and design, congregate housing, housing disruption and site/location criteria.
    Prerequisite: FCS 4315 (Habitats and Public Policy)or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours.
  •  

    FCS 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graduate students may broaden or intensify their program through individual research and involvement in a given area of family and consumer sciences.
  •  

    FCS 5525 - Product of Learning (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    FCS 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An opportunity to study a special topic or combination of topics not otherwise provided for the Family and Consumer Sciences curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.
  •  

    FCS 5551 - Families in Later Life (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    In-depth study of factors influencing interrelationships in family development in the later years.
    Prerequisite: FCS 2103 (Family Development Over the Life Cycle) or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with FCS 4551.]
  •  

    FCS 5600 - Families, Economics and Demographic Change (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of the economic pressures on families and how these pressures have helped to produce demographic change in families. This process will involve the identification of major demographic changes, discussion of key elementary economic concepts, and the application of these concepts to the family setting.
    Prerequisite: FCS 2600 (Family Economics) or ECO 2030 (Principles of Economics - Price Theory) or equivalent.
  •  

    FCS 5609 - Seminar in Vocational Education (1)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the historical, legislative, and philosophical bases of vocational education; organization of vocational education in North Carolina; and contemporary issues in vocational education.
    Prerequisites: Approval of the instructor.
    [Dual-listed with FCS 4609.]
  •  

    FCS 5610 - Administration of Early Childhood Programs (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the role of the program administrator in a variety of early childhood settings, both public, private, and non-profit. This study will involve program planning, staff administration, assessment of facility and equipment needs, appropriate program and financial management using computer management software and studying the state regulations that govern programs for young children.
    Prerequisite: : FCS 4556 (Infant/Toddler Curriculum) or FCS 4602 (Preschool Curriculum and Instruction) or FCS 3110 (Enriching Experiences and Programming for School-Age Children) or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture three hours. [Dual-listed with FCS 4610.]
  •  

    FCS 5611 - Psychosocial Care of Families and Children in the Hospital (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    This course is designed to prepare students to work in non-medical professions with families and children in a hospital setting. The course includes an understanding of procedures, illnesses, and stress along with theory and practice to better serve families. This course is taught by a Certified Child Life Specialist and meets the requirements for the Child Life Council.
    [Dual-listed with FCS 4611.]
  •  

    FCS 5700 - Advanced Curriculum in Family and Consumer Sciences (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Applying curriculum theory for updating and reorganizing secondary and postsecondary family and consumer sciences curriculum including the integration of FHA.
    Prerequisite: licensed family and consumer sciences teacher or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    FCS 5705 - Evaluation in Family and Consumer Sciences (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Evaluation theory, process, and skill in relation to assessing student achievement and program effectiveness. Application of knowledge will be made through the development of test item banks.
    Prerequisite: eligible for teaching license or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    FCS 5710 - Family and Consumer Sciences Communication Strategies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Selection, organization, and use of strategies and materials for presenting family and consumer sciences related concepts.
    Prerequisite: eligible for teaching licensure or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours.
  •  

    FCS 5900 - Internship (3-12)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A structured field experience, paid or unpaid, in an area related to the program and supervised by department faculty. A proposal is to be submitted to the graduate committee and be approved for participation the semester previous to beginning the experience. No credit will be given for experience not previously approved.
    Prerequisite: 15 s.h. graduate courses toward degree program and proposal approved.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    FCS 5901 - Research Project (1-3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Implementation of an approved research proposal: collection and analysis of data, preparation of report(s) and presentation of project. FCS 5901 may be repeated for a total credit of three semester hours.
    Prerequisite: FCS 5001  and proficiency in statistics.
  •  

    FCS 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. FCS 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  •  

    FCS 5999 - Thesis (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.

Department of Human Development and Psychological Counseling

Catherine Clark, Interim Chair

hpc.appstate.edu

All courses are taught from a multicultural perspective, which emphasizes the differing experiences, cultures, histories, and perspectives of people from a variety of ethnic, gender, racial, and social class backgrounds.

The department also provides group methods, human relations, and other human development courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels for the Reich College of Education and the University. These courses are valuable for majors in other departments. A course in life and career planning and courses in leadership development are offered for undergraduate students. The department offers a variety of summer institutes to enhance the learning of both graduate students and practitioners seeking continuing education opportunities in human service fields.

Clinical Mental Health Counseling, MA and Addictions Counseling Graduate Certificate and Expressive Arts Therapy Graduate Certificate

Mark Schwarze, Graduate Program Director, Coordinator for Addiction Counseling Certificate
asucmhc@appstate.edu

Melia Snyder, Coordinator for Expressive Arts Therapy Certificate
snyderma@appstate.edu

The Master of Arts degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is designed to meet the need for advanced preparation of counselors and other helping professionals who work in a wide variety of human service agencies (including mental health centers, social service agencies, business and industry and others). In addition to the core curriculum, students can select, in cooperation with their departmental advisor, from a variety of elective courses, which will help meet their individual career objectives. Specialized concentrations are available as listed below including a general concentration for students who choose to design, along with their advisor, their own emphasis.

Accreditation: The master’s degree program in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a specialized accrediting body. Graduates are immediately eligible to take the examination of the National Board for Certified Counselors, Inc., to become National Certified Counselors.

Master Of Arts Program Requirements/Options: The basic requirements for the program are listed below. In addition to the curriculum listed under each program, the following items apply:

  • A master’s degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling requires completion of a minimum of 60 semester hours of approved courses.
  • Students may choose to include a thesis as a component of their program of study.
  • Students in CACREP approved programs in the department must meet for a minimum of 10 clock hours in a planned group activity intended to provide direct experiences as a participant in a small group. This requirement is met during HPC 5790 and/or HPC 6720.
  • On an individual basis, it may be suggested students receive professional counseling to aid them in their personal growth.
  • The Handbook of Policies and Procedures available in the HPC office provides information on liability insurance, academic appeals, retention policy, personal endorsement policy, admissions policies, and placement services.
  • Permission forms to take practica and internships are available in the HPC office and must be completed prior to registration.
  • The program in Clinical Mental Health Counseling requires the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).

College Student Development

Catherine Clark, Graduate Program Director
clarkcr@appstate.edu

The College Student Development program is designed to prepare student development specialists to work in a variety of areas (residence life, career development, student activities, leadership, academic advising, etc.) within colleges and universities.

Students majoring in College Student Development will take the courses listed in this section. Students must select one of the following concentrations: College Outdoor Program Administration (496D) or Student Affairs Practice (496C). In addition to the core and the required concentration courses, students will select, in cooperation with and approved by the student’s advisor and program committee, from a variety of elective courses which will help meet their individual career objectives. Each student should see her/his advisor prior to registering. All electives must be approved by each student’s program committee.

Accreditation: The program in College Student Development (Student Affairs Practice concentration) is designed to meet the curriculum guidelines of the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS).

Master of Arts Program Requirements/Options: The basic requirements for the program are listed below. In addition to the curriculum listed under each program, the following items apply:

  • A first master’s degree in College Student Development requires completion of 48 semester hours of approved courses.
  • A second master’s degree requires meeting all program course requirements with a minimum of 36 semester hours.
  • On an individual basis, students may be required to receive professional counseling to aid them in their personal growth.
  • The Handbook of Policies and Procedures available in the HPC office provides information on liability insurance, academic appeals, retention policy, personal endorsement policy, admissions policies, and placement services.
  • Permission forms to take practica and internships are available in the HPC office and must be completed prior to registration.
  • Applicants for programs in College Student Development are required to take the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) and have an interview, which can be conducted by telephone if the applicant cannot visit campus.

Marriage and Family Therapy and Systemic Multicultural Counseling Graduate Certificate

mft.appstate.edu

Jon Winek, Graduate Degree Program Director
winekjl@appstate.edu

Laura Gambrel, Coordinator for Systemic Multicultural Counseling Certificate
gambrell@appstate.edu

The Marriage & Family Therapy program is designed to prepare counselors to work specifically with families in a wide variety of work settings. The program meets the educational requirements for clinical membership in the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT), and North Carolina licensure.

Students who meet the general graduate school requirements are considered for admission into the Marriage and Family Therapy Program by the Admissions Committee. The committee is comprised of the MFT faculty. In reaching admissions decisions, the committee considers GPA, GPA in major, GPA in related courses, GRE scores, response to the departmental questionnaire, letters of reference and performance in an interview conducted by faculty and current students. There are circumstances in which exceptions may be made.

Accreditation: The Marriage and Family Therapy program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, 1133 Fifteenth Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20005-2710, (202) 452-0109.

Master of Arts Program Requirements/Options: The basic requirements for the program are listed below. In addition to the curriculum listed under each program, the following items apply:

  • A first master’s degree in Marriage and Family Therapy requires completion of a minimum of 48 semester hours of approved courses. The thesis option for Marriage and Family Therapy requires a minimum of 48 semester hours of approved course work plus thesis hours (4 s.h.) = 52 total hours.
  • A second master’s degree requires meeting all program course requirements with a minimum of 36 semester hours.
  • Students in CACREP approved programs in the department must meet for a minimum of 10 clock hours in a planned group activity intended to provide direct experiences as a participant in a small group. This requirement is met during HPC 5790  and/or HPC 6720 .
  • On an individual basis, students may be required to receive professional counseling to aid them in their personal growth.
  • The Handbook of Policies and Procedures available in the HPC office provides information on liability insurance, academic appeals, retention policy, personal endorsement policy, admissions policies, and placement services.
  • Permission forms to take practica and internships are available in the HPC office and must be completed prior to registration.
  • Applicants for Marriage and Family Therapy are required to take the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) and have an interview.

Professional School Counseling

Jill Van Horne, Graduate Program Director
vanhornejw@appstate.edu

The Professional School Counseling program is designed to meet North Carolina licensure requirements and to prepare counselors for elementary, middle, and secondary schools.

Accreditation: The master’s degree program in Professional School Counseling is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a specialized accrediting body. Graduates are immediately eligible to take the examination of the National Board for Certified Counselors, Inc., to become National Certified Counselors (NCC). The Professional School Counseling program is also accredited/approved by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI).

Master of Arts Program Requirements/Options: The basic requirements for the program are listed below. In addition to the curriculum listed under each program, the following items apply:

  • A first master’s degree in Professional School Counseling requires completion of a minimum of 60 semester hours of approved courses.
  • A second master’s degree requires meeting all program course requirements with a minimum of 39 semester hours.
  • Students in CACREP approved programs in the department must meet for a minimum of 10 clock hours in a planned group activity intended to provide direct experiences as a participant in a small group. This requirement is met during HPC 5790  and/or HPC 6720 .
  • On an individual basis, students may be required to receive professional counseling to aid them in their personal growth.
  • The Handbook of Policies and Procedures available in the HPC office provides information on liability insurance, academic appeals, retention policy, personal endorsement policy, admissions policies, and placement services.
  • Permission forms to take practica and internships are available in the HPC office and must be completed prior to registration.
  • Applicants for Professional School Counseling are required to take the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) and have an interview.

Programs

Master of Arts

Graduate Certificate

Courses

Human Development & Psychological Counseling

  •  

    HPC 5000 - Internship in Public Schools (1-9)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Designed for school counselor graduate students who do not possess an “A” teaching license and who must have an extended internship in a public school setting prior to obtaining an “M” license. Each internship is arranged and coordinated on an individual basis consistent with state policies. This course will be limited to students accepted into the school counselor program and the course credit will not count toward the graduate degree.
    [Dual-listed with HPC 4900.)
  •  

    HPC 5100 - Counseling Techniques for Teachers of Young Adolescents (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Acquaint teachers of early adolescents with appropriate counseling techniques, interactional processes, and resource materials.
  •  

    HPC 5110 - Multicultural Counseling (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer Session
    An exploration of counseling issues related to a culturally diverse client population.
  •  

    HPC 5120 - Introduction to Clinical Mental Health Counseling (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An introduction to the issues, functions and scope of the work being done in various human service agencies. Helping approaches with selected client populations and related professional concerns will be examined.
    Prerequisite: registration is restricted to Clinical Mental Health Counseling majors.
  •  

    HPC 5130 - Women’s Issues in Counseling (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Even-numbered years
    Based on study of historical, social, multicultural, and familial influences on the development of women, this course addresses counseling issues related to women’s identity, self-esteem and relationships.
  •  

    HPC 5140 - Psychological and Educational Testing (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A study of representative psychological and educational tests/inventories including the rationale which underlies testing.
  •  

    HPC 5190 - Helping Skills in Student Affairs Practice (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An introduction and overview to the role of the student affairs educator as a facilitator of individual and group development. Methods of helping, group facilitation skills, and leading and managing groups appropriate to student affairs functions will be developed.
  •  

    HPC 5210 - Life and Career Planning (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Assists counselors and others in various work settings to attain knowledge and skills essential in helping individuals to consider possible careers and life style options. Approaches to career development, sources of informational materials, and the life planning needs of particular clientele are emphasized.
  •  

    HPC 5220 - Counseling Theory and Techniques (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Several selected theories of counseling will be studied in depth, emphasizing primary sources. Other theories will be studied, giving breadth to this area of knowledge. Interrelationships of personality development, learning and “problems” will be stressed.
  •  

    HPC 5225 - The Helping Relationship (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer Session
    This course examines the philosophy of the therapeutic relationship, basic counseling skills and the developmental process of the counseling relationship. Through experiential activity, this course will develop in students the effective counseling skills necessary to sustain the counseling relationship from the initial interview to the termination of the relationship with individuals, family/couples, and in group modalities. The focus of this course is on developing students’ presence, awareness, and use of effective counseling skills and basic active listening skills. Students will learn, observe, evaluate, and demonstrate effective counseling behaviors through the use of counseling skills practice (with other students), presentation of video/audiotaped sessions, and the evaluation of practice sessions/skills of classmates under the supervision of the instructor and other advanced students.
    Prerequisite for HPC 5900  and HPC 6900 .
  •  

    HPC 5270 - Theories of Marriage and Family Therapy I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study from the systemic perspective of the historical development, theoretical and empirical foundations, and current issues in marriage and family therapy. Major models of marriage, couple and family therapy are surveyed.
  •  

    HPC 5271 - Theories of Marriage and Family Therapy II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of a selected number of theories concerning marriage and family therapy. Class will involve role play, group discussion, and demonstration of marriage and family therapy.
    Prerequisite: HPC 5270 .
  •  

    HPC 5272 - Individual and Family Development (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer Session
    An introduction to theories of individual and family development across the lifespan. Emphasis will be given to clinical issues impacting individual and family development including behavioral crises, theories of personality, cultural implications, situational and environmental factors, wellness, and addictive behaviors.
  •  

    HPC 5273 - Mediation and Divorce Therapy (3)


    When Offered: Fall. Even-numbered years
    Recognizing divorce as a frequent phenomenon in families, this course is designed to study the history, effects, and re-growth as a result of divorce. In addition to a review of current literature, there will be a concentration on pertinent, long-term studies of divorces, and the results and effects on children, as well as viewing proposed models of mediation and therapy for persons who choose to pursue such assistance.
  •  

    HPC 5274 - Substance Abuse in Family Systems (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An examination of the range of substance abuse issues impacting the family system. Topics will include etiology of substance abuse and addiction within the family, impact upon members of the system and its dynamics, intervention and treatment approaches, and long-term recovery issues. Special attention will be given to the topics of co-dependency and core issues of adult children of dysfunctional families.
    Prerequisites: HPC 5270 , HPC 5560 , or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HPC 5275 - Systemic Family Therapy Institute (3-9)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course and earn up to a total of nine semester hours. This annual summer institute is designed to provide graduate students and working professionals with an opportunity for in-depth exploration of cutting-edge topics within the marriage and family therapy field.
  •  

    HPC 5310 - Introduction to Professional School Counseling (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The study of comprehensive, developmental school counseling programs; appropriate counselor roles (counseling, coordination, and consultation); and methods of providing services to students, families, and school personnel within a collaborative framework.
  •  

    HPC 5315 - Elementary/Middle Grades School Counseling (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Designed primarily for counselors who plan to work or are currently working in elementary or middle grades settings. Emphasis is given to philosophy and organization; the role and functions of elementary and middle grades counselors; components of comprehensive elementary and middle grades school counseling programs; and special issues related to theory and practice of working with children and adolescents.
  •  

    HPC 5340 - Research in College Student Development and Student Affairs Practice (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This introductory research course is designed to provide opportunities to review, evaluate, conduct and disseminate educational research related to the practice of Student Affairs. This course is a prerequisite for HPC 6330 .
  •  

    HPC 5380 - College Students and Their Environments (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of characteristics, needs, and goals of college students, including selected populations; appraisal and effect of college environments and other socio-cultural factors on students; and implications for Student Affairs Practice.
  •  

    HPC 5410 - Introduction to Student Affairs (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An introduction and overview of student affairs functions within institutions of higher education emphasizing the history, student affairs programming models, professional standards and ethics in professional conduct, professional associations, organizational models and staffing patterns, and issues and trends in student affairs practice.
  •  

    HPC 5440 - Student Affairs and the Great Outdoors (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Even-numbered years
    The purpose of this course is to explore the connections between student affairs and outdoor education/experiential education. This course is required for the concentration in College Outdoor Program Administration under the Master of Arts degree in College Student Development. Students will have the opportunity to experience hands on training in theoretical approaches to integrating outdoor experiences into their work in student affairs.
  •  

    HPC 5441 - Historical Perspectives on College Student Support Services (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is a semester-long study of comparative educational systems that culminates in a two week learning abroad experience to the United Kingdom. Participants will learn about the history of higher education in the UK and current program offerings at campuses in each of these cities while taking time to participate in local culture and attractions.
  •  

    HPC 5450 - Learning Communities (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the concepts on Learning Communities. This will be accomplished through an understanding of the history and models of learning communities, constituents, and the institutional priorities. The academic and student affairs contexts and cultures will be explored. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to work on a project designing a learning community.
  •  

    HPC 5460 - Professional Practice in College Student Development (3-9)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    The purpose of this course is for students to gain full-time experience in a Student affairs office prior to their internship. The practical experience is geared towards increasing their skills, introducing them to new cultures and environments and allowing them to explore various aspects of Student Affairs. Sites must be approved by the instructor. May be repeated for a total credit of nine semester hours upon the approval of the department chair.
  •  

    HPC 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    HPC 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Subject matter may vary from term to term depending on student interest and need. A student may enroll more than once in a selected topics course provided that the content does not duplicate that of the previous course.
  •  

    HPC 5560 - The Addictive Process (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An examination of sociological and psychological contributions to alcohol and drug addiction and abuse in our society. The addictive process and its impact on the individual and society are described, as well as treatment and preventive program efforts. Students will also examine their own feelings and attitudes about alcohol and drug use and abuse.
    [Dual-listed with HPC 4570.]
  •  

    HPC 5570 - Counseling the Addicted Person (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An in-depth study of the various intervention and therapeutic models utilized with addicted clients, including individual, group, and family counseling approaches. Unique aspects, demands, and imperatives of the addiction vis-à-vis the helping relationship are discussed.
    Prerequisite: HPC 5560 .
  •  

    HPC 5680 - Counseling the Aging (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to aid graduate students interested in gerontology to understand and appreciate aging as a lifelong process. Emphasis is also given to various effects of aging-physiological, psychological, financial, etc. Counseling strategies and understanding family dynamics pertaining to aging will also be studied.
  •  

    HPC 5700 - Teaching Sex Education Within a Family Context (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to help health educators learn and develop strategies for teaching family living and sexuality to different age groups such as elementary, middle grades, secondary and adults. Topics to be included are reproductive anatomy, physiology, STD and AIDS, varying cultural differences, and gaining community support. Each student will be responsible for developing appropriate curricula materials for the age group she/he will be teaching.
  •  

    HPC 5710 - Helping the Troubled Employee (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An introduction to employee assistance programming in a wide variety of settings. Historical development, current issues and trends, program structure, implementation, administration and evaluation are stressed. Visiting practitioners, student projects, and field trips will emphasize practical skills development in this helping model based in the work setting.
  •  

    HPC 5751 - Ethics and Law in Professional Practice (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of current legal and ethical issues confronting the college student development specialist or counselor in practice. Topics include authority and environment of ethics and law, ethical decision analysis, and topical issues such as student safety, liability, confidentiality, privacy, libel and slander, due process, and other related ethical and legal concepts. The course goal is to provide future practitioners with a working knowledge of ethical and legal issues so as to inform good practice.
  •  

    HPC 5752 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of legal and ethical issues confronting community agency, mental health and rehabilitation counselors. Topics include moral reasoning; tort liability; confidentiality; privacy; libel; slander; due process; federal and state rules, regulations, and statutes; and other important concepts and actions resulting in legal and ethical questions.
    Prerequisites: HPC 5120  and registration is restricted to Clinical Mental Health Counseling majors.
  •  

    HPC 5753 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Marriage and Family Therapy (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A contextual study of legal and ethical issues related to the profession of marriage and family therapy. Topics include professional identity, scope of practice, professional organizations, licensure, ethical codes, confidentiality, legal responsibility and liabilities of clinical practice and research, family law, record keeping, reimbursement, and the business aspects of practice.
  •  

    HPC 5754 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Professional School Counseling (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An exploration of ethical and legal standards, and applications specific to professional school counseling. General topics will include the ethical decision-making process, confidentiality, privileged communication, informed consent, duty to warn, dual relationships, record keeping, parental rights, the rights of minors, testifying in court, and testing. Special topics and the needs of special populations will be examined.
  •  

    HPC 5790 - Group Methods and Processes (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer Session
    A study of group dynamics, experimentation in groups, leadership roles, and applicability to other settings.
    [Dual-listed with HPC 4790.]
  •  

    HPC 5820 - College Student Development Theories I (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides an overview of the cognitive theories of student development. Particular emphasis will be placed on utilizing theory to understand and describe student learning, human behavior and development over the life span. The course includes cognitive and moral development theories. A multicultural focus will be included in the study of these theories. This course is a prerequisite for HPC 5821 .
  •  

    HPC 5821 - College Student Development Theories II (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course provides an overview of the psychosocial theories of student development. Particular emphasis will be placed on utilizing theory to understand and describe student learning, human behavior and development over the life span. The course includes psychosocial and identity theories. A multicultural focus will be included in the study of these theories.
    Prerequisite: HPC 5820 .
  •  

    HPC 5840 - Human Relations and Interaction (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Examines the key elements in effective interpersonal communication. Students will be exposed to one or more human relations models that are designed to improve their communication skills. Emphasis will be given to applying constructive methods of human relations in a variety of settings including business, schools, and social service agencies.
    [Dual-listed with HPC 4840.]
  •  

    HPC 5850 - Theory and Practice of Reality Therapy (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A basic course introducing the theory and practice of Reality Therapy in a variety of therapeutic settings. Emphasis will be placed on the principles and implications of control theory, including the fundamentals of the practice of Reality Therapy, and its relationship to the cycle of counseling.
  •  

    HPC 5860 - Dreamwork: Clinical Methods (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Odd-numbered years
    An in-depth study of dreamwork as a clinical method, including theoretical approaches to dreams, clinical issues and current trends, and cross-cultural perspectives on the role of dreams, myths, and symbols in psychological healing.
  •  

    HPC 5870 - Creative Process, Movement, and Therapy (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    An examination of body awareness, creative expression, and movement in therapy. Particular attention will be paid to the concept of creative process and how it relates to human development, personality integration, and healing.
    [Dual-listed with DAN 4870.]
  •  

    HPC 5900 - Practicum (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Practica are available in the areas given below according to the chosen curriculum. Some practicums may be repeated for additional credit when there is space and upon approval of the advisor and the departmental chair. Practicum in Counseling: Professional practice provides for the application of theory and the development of counseling skills under supervision. These experiences will provide opportunities for students to counsel clients who represent the ethnic and demographic diversity of their community. Prerequisites CMHC: HPC 5120 , HPC 5220 , HPC 5225 , HPC 5752 , HPC 5790 , and approval of department chairperson. Prerequisites PSC: HPC 5310 , HPC 5790 , HPC 5220 , and approval of department chairperson. Practicum in College Student Development: An opportunity for on-the-job observation and limited practice in at least two student development functions/offices either on the ASU campus or in another area post-secondary institution. Open only to student development majors. Prior approval of the departmental chair. Practicum in Group Leadership: Supervised practice in group leadership.
    Prerequisites: HPC 5790 , HPC 6720 , and prior approval of the departmental chair.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    HPC 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. HPC 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  •  

    HPC 5999 - Thesis (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    HPC 6120 - Developmental Assessment and Diagnosis in Counseling (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An in-depth and critical examination of developmental assessment and diagnosis in a variety of counseling settings. Specific attention will be given to the interface of the assessment and diagnostic process, the sociocultural context of individuals, and an understanding of basic psychopharmacology within a developmental and humanistic framework.
    Prerequisites: HPC 5120  or HPC 5310  and registration is restricted to Clinical Mental Health and Professional School Counseling majors.
  •  

    HPC 6160 - Gestalt Therapy (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An examination of the Gestalt Therapy model. The course combines experiential and conceptual approaches. Emphasis is placed on developing personal and unique styles of interventions within the framework of Gestalt Therapy.
  •  

    HPC 6162 - Systemic Gestalt Therapy (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An advanced course which focuses on the application of gestalt concepts within a systemic model.
    Prerequisite: HPC 6160  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HPC 6270 - Marriage and Family Counseling: Clinical Issues (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An examination of basic issues and special problems in the therapeutic intervention in families.
    Prerequisite: HPC 5270 .
  •  

    HPC 6271 - Theories of Marriage and Family Therapy III (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    A comprehensive survey of major models of marriage and family therapy with emphasis on the relationship of theory to practice.
  •  

    HPC 6272 - Marital and Couples Therapy (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    This seminar examines key issues associated with effective marital and couples therapy. Emphasis is given to an overview of fundamental theoretical models of intimate relationships and models for effecting healing and growth in such relationships.
  •  

    HPC 6280 - Assessment and Diagnosis in Marriage and Family Therapy (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A seminar designed to provide a background in diagnosis and assessment including skills necessary to conduct a relational assessment interview, as well as the development of assessment skills through the use of family sculpture, family genogram, role play, and exercises.
    Prerequisite: HPC 5271  or permission of the instructor.
  •  

    HPC 6290 - Child and Adolescent Therapy (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    The application of child development and counseling theories to the practice of counseling children and adolescents. Focus will be on clinical practice, diagnostic skills, play and art therapy, family systems interventions, parent training programs, and behavioral interventions.
  •  

    HPC 6330 - Assessment and Program Evaluation in Student Affairs (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The focus will be on assessing outcomes of enrollment in post-secondary institutions, assessment methodologies used for exploring student outcomes, systematic program evaluation, and the application of student development theory to practice.
    Prerequisite: HPC 5340 .
  •  

    HPC 6340 - Ecotherapy (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will examine emerging paradigms in psychology and counseling in systems theory, the nature of consciousness, and ecopsychology.
  •  

    HPC 6350 - Body/Mind (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Even-numbered years
    A study of the interrelationship of physical and mental functioning as it pertains to counseling, including the mind/body problem as a systematic issue in psychology, exploration of the current resurgence of interest in mind/body functioning relative to total well-being, and an overview of current uses of mind/body experiences as therapeutic techniques.
  •  

    HPC 6355 - Mindfulness Based Counseling (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course will introduce students to mindfulness based counseling modeled on the program developed at the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s Stress Reduction Clinic. Within the context of educational and health care services, mindfulness is aimed at assisting individuals to develop an array of self-regulatory, selfcare skills. The effectiveness of mindfulness based interventions is predicated on providers who are substantively grounded in mindfulness meditation practice, hence the strong experiential component to the course.
  •  

    HPC 6360 - Therapy and the Expressive Arts (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An examination of the relationship between artistic expression and individual mental health. Theories and techniques of various arts therapies will be studied relative to diagnosis and treatment as well as to personality integration and personal growth.
  •  

    HPC 6365 - Expressive Arts Summer Institute (3-9)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    Variable content. Barring duplication a student may repeat the course and earn up to a total of nine semester hours. This intensive institute provides practicing therapists, counselors, graduate students, and artists opportunities to explore cutting edge practices in the integration of expressive arts in counseling. The Appalachian approach to Expressive Arts Therapy emphasizes the power of the arts to build community and support a space of temenos, where the arts can help us to access our individual and collective resources for living. This course will include theoretical background in Expressive Arts Therapy, as well as a variety of experiential large group, small group, and individual art making activities.
  •  

    HPC 6366 - EXA Child/Adolescents (3-6)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    Variable content. Barring duplication a student may repeat the course and earn up to a total of six semester hours. This annual summer institute is designed to present a comprehensive and developmentally oriented approach for the application of play theories, techniques, and the creative/expressive arts to the process of counseling children and adolescents. The course will consist of class discussions, presentations, cooperative and group experiential learning activities, and “hands on” type of activities/projects which students will prepare and present. Students will learn techniques of play therapy, art, music, movement, creative dramatics, imagery, writing, and poetry for use in both the school and agency setting.
  •  

    HPC 6370 - Intermodal Expressive Arts (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An examination of theories, techniques, and functions of psychotherapeutic approaches using intermodal expressive arts, emphasizing cross-cultural contexts of creative expression and human development.
    Prerequisite: HPC 6360 .
  •  

    HPC 6380 - Therapeutic Writing (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Even-numbered years
    An exploration of writing and the therapeutic process. Students will experience a variety of methods in using the written word to enhance client change as well as for self-care for the therapist.
  •  

    HPC 6390 - Current Issues in Expressive Arts Therapy (3)


    When Offered: Spring.Even-numbered years
    An examination of current issues in expressive arts therapy, emphasizing cross-cultural contexts of creative expression and human development.
    Prerequisite: HPC 6360 .
  •  

    HPC 6410 - Student Development Administration (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    An overview of organizational theories, management, and administration in student development practice, including budget and finance, governance and policy making, organizational change processes, process consultation, administrative uses of computers, and human resource development.
    Prerequisite: HPC 5410 .
  •  

    HPC 6451 - Clinical Mental Health Counseling Seminar (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An examination of current issues and trends in mental health counseling, agency counseling, and rehabilitation counseling, focusing on the transition from clinical trainee to entry level practitioner in areas such as psychosocial assessment, prevention/education/intervention techniques, administration of programs, and supervision.
    Prerequisites: HPC 5120 , HPC 5220 , HPC 5752 , HPC 5790 ; and registration is restricted to Clinical Mental Health Counseling majors.
    Prerequisite or corequisite: HPC 5900  (Practicum in Counseling).
  •  

    HPC 6452 - Seminar in Professional School Counseling (3)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    This course is designed to provide opportunities for students to further develop knowledge and skills in order to deliver a comprehensive and developmental school counseling program. A wide variety of topics currently addressed in professional school counseling literature will be studied.
    Prerequisite: HPC 5310 .
  •  

    HPC 6500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    HPC 6525 - Advanced Systemic Multicultural Counseling (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An exploration of counseling issues related to a culturally diverse client population.
    Prerequisite: HPC 5110 
  •  

    HPC 6530-6549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    HPC 6570 - The Appalachian Addictions Institute (3-9)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course and earn up to a total of nine semester hours. This annual summer institute is designed to provide graduate students and working professionals with an opportunity for in-depth exploration of cutting-edge, clinical issues and topics within the addictions field.
  •  

    HPC 6620 - School-Based Consultation (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    For school psychologists, counselors and other human service personnel in various fields who deal with parents and/or teachers in a consultative and educational capacity. The course will include a review of consultation models and theories of both a group and triadic nature. It will also provide an opportunity for role play which reflects actual consulting situations. Emphasis will be placed on concerns related to academic deficit, behavioral problems in the school and home, and family stress.
    (Same as PSY 6620 .)
  •  

    HPC 6710 - Human Sexuality (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Classical and contemporary theories of sexual identity and behavior, family planning, reproduction, emotionality, intimacy, and values are studied. Special attention is given to the work of Kinsey, Hooker, and Masters and Johnson, and most recent researchers. Attention is given to futurity, especially as it pertains to current practices and values regarding family planning, general health, sexuality and one’s self-esteem. Counseling strategies will be considered pertaining to many currently reported sexual dysfunctions such as impotence, premature ejaculation and lack of sexual response.
  •  

    HPC 6720 - Group Counseling/Therapy (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Theory and practice of group counseling/therapy, including group process, leadership style, and outcome.
    Prerequisite: HPC 5790  or equivalent.
  •  

    HPC 6730 - Sexual Abuse Counseling (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An in-depth examination of the subject of sexual abuse counseling. The course provides an overview of the issues involved in sexual abuse and relates these to the assessment and treatment processes used by counselors and other helping professionals.
  •  

    HPC 6750 - College Student Development Institute (3-9)


    When Offered: Summer Session
    This annual summer institute is designed to allow college administrators, counselors, instructors, other student development personnel, and graduate students to consider a variety of issues facing students and student development specialists. There is variable content each summer with the theme and topics reflecting current issues and needs. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course and earn up to a total of nine semester hours.
  •  

    HPC 6770 - Current Issues and Special Populations in Addictions Counseling (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Current issues in the addictions field as they impact both counselors and their clients are addressed. Both practical and theoretical orientations of working with addicted clients are discussed. An emphasis is placed in the course on working with rural and minority clients.
  •  

    HPC 6900 - Internship (1-18)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer Session
    Advanced students in counselor education will have supervised experiences in specific functions of the counselor education field in a public school system, post-secondary institution, or other appropriate agency. In addition to those listed below, other specific experiences will be developed and approved by the student and the student’s advisory committee. May be taken up to a total of eighteen semester hours with permission of the departmental chair. Graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisite: prior approval of the departmental chair.

    Internship in Professional School Counseling: Practice in the application of skills used in counseling elementary/middle/secondary school youth. Setting to be decided upon in consultation with the internship supervisor. A minimum of 600 clock hours of work (full-time) as a counselor in the school will be required. Graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisites: HPC 5140 , HPC 5210 , HPC 5220 , HPC 5225 , HPC 5310 , HPC 5754 , HPC 5790 , HPC 5900 , HPC 6620 /PSY 6620 , admission to candidacy, and approval of the departmental chair.

    Internship in Clinical Mental Health Counseling: On-the-job experience will be emphasized through placement of students in appropriate human service agencies. Includes practice in the counseling and other helping skills used in various agencies. Available primarily for Clinical Mental Health Counseling majors. Graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisites: HPC 5120 , HPC 5220 , HPC 5225 , HPC 5752 , HPC 5790 , HPC 5900 , HPC 6451  and approval of departmental chairperson.

    Internship in College Student Development: On-the-job experience will be emphasized through placement of students in specific student development functions/offices either on the ASU campus or in another area post-secondary institution. Available primarily for college student development majors. Graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisites: HPC 5410 , HPC 5900  (Practicum in College Student Development) and/or HPC 5900  (Practicum in Counseling), and prior approval of the departmental chair.

    Internship in Marriage and Family Therapy (3+3+6).F;S;SS.: Supervised practice in the application of skills used in systemic individual, couple and family therapy. Open only to marriage and family therapy majors. Graded on an S/U basis. Prior approval of the departmental chair.
    Prerequisite: prior approval of the departmental chair.

Department of Leadership and Educational Studies

Terry McClannon, Chair

les.appstate.edu

The Department of Leadership and Educational Studies serves the education community and the public through:

  • foundations of education courses for teacher education majors
  • research courses to help students develop skills and knowledge needed to understand the design, implementation, and evaluation of educational research
  • graduate programs in public school administration; community college and higher education administration, teaching, developmental education and adult education; library science; and educational media/instructional technology

Educational Media, MA
Instructional Technology Facilitation Graduate Certificate
Instructional Technology Leadership Graduate Certificate
New Media Literacies and Global Perspectives Graduate Certificate
Online Learning and Professional Development Graduate Certificate

Herb Brown, Graduate Program Co-Director
brownhf@appstate.edu

Amy Cheney, Graduate Program Co-Director
cheneyal@appstate.edu

The Master of Arts in Educational Media provides an innovative blending of learning opportunities in the design, production, application, and evaluation of a broad range of media and technology. Students are encouraged to pursue work in both traditional and emerging technologies related to all aspects of educational media. Graduates of the program will be prepared to assume leadership roles in various fields of media and technology. The range of possibilities for students in the four concentrations includes the study of digital technologies in education, multimedia systems and website production, as well as media literacy, instructional design, and telecommunications systems.

The Online Learning and Professional Development concentration and certificate offer students the opportunity to gain technical, aesthetic, and intellectual skills and perspectives to analyze and develop online learning and professional development pedagogies and environments. The program of study engages the learner in constructivist learning environments and local and global learning communities. Particular emphasis is placed on instructional design, technological tools for the creation, hosting, and delivery of online content, and the assessment of online learning and professional development solutions. The ethical and social issues involved in distance learning will also be examined. This concentration does not lead to North Carolina Licensure.

The New Media Literacies and Global Perspectives concentration and certificate develop the intellectual, technical, and aesthetic skills to successfully create, utilize and critique traditional, emerging, and converging new media, technologies, and literacies as they relate to individuals, societies, and cultures. Emphasis is placed on an investigation of the production, form, language, and dissemination of a variety of texts, including print, non-print, and evolving media forms (e.g., web-based media, augmented reality, etc.). Emphasis is also placed upon the analysis of new media in light of educational, cultural and social forces from both local and global perspectives. This concentration does not lead to North Carolina Licensure.

The K-12 concentration is designed for education professionals and others who wish to enhance their use of digital technologies for teaching and learning. This concentration is designed to prepare traditional and nontraditional students to assume educational leadership roles in the use of instructional technology in public schools, public libraries and related educational settings through active scholarship, reflection, professional discourse and interdisciplinary programs of study based on the integration of theory and practice. This concentration leads to 077 ‘M’ level licensure for Instructional Technology Specialists.

The General concentration is tailored for students with a focus in the integration of Computer/Information Systems and/or Computer Science in educational environments.

The Graduate Certificate in Instructional Technology Facilitation leads to the Special Endorsement in Computer Education (18079) or 077 “M’ level licensure for Instructional Technology Specialists. The Endorsement is designed for school computer teachers or computer resource teachers for one or more schools, and is the recommended certification for the school level Technology Facilitator. 077 Licensure may be added for individuals who already hold a Master’s degree in an educational field. The certificate program promotes an in-depth understanding of the applications of and considerations for the integration of digital technologies in schools.

General Information for all Students: A student working toward a degree and/or licensure in the Department of Leadership and Educational must develop her/his Program of Study in consultation with an approved advisor. Degree students taking courses without being officially assigned an advisor and receiving the advisor’s approval do so at the risk of not having the courses approved as part of the degree program.

All electives must be approved by the student’s advisor in all programs. Students pursuing or holding graduate degrees in other departments, and also seeking administration and supervision licensure, must take the necessary courses and internship prescribed by the Department of Leadership and Educational Studies.

Higher Education

Vachel Miller, Graduate Program Director
millervw@appstate.edu

The Higher Education graduate program was founded in 1968 in response to the growing need for community college and university instructors and administrators in North Carolina postsecondary institutions. Although the program continues its original role, it now serves a national and international population of students and professionals concerned with postsecondary education. The program’s purposes include:

  • preparing individuals for teaching and leadership roles in community college and university settings.
  • advancing the skills and knowledge of current two-year and four-year college and university professionals.
  • preparing students to design, deliver, and evaluate educational programs for adults in community colleges and universities, allied health programs, industry, the community, and other agencies and organizations offering adult education.
  • preparing students for doctoral-level studies.

Higher Education (M.A.)- prepares students who wish to work in postsecondary institutional settings. Students must select one of the following concentrations: Adult and Developmental Education, Community College and University Leadership, or Teaching. The teaching concentration is designed to prepare students to teach in two-year community colleges and four-year institutions. The degree in Higher Education does not lead to North Carolina public school administration and supervision licensure.

Higher Education (Ed.S.)- provides an advanced graduate degree beyond the M.A. for professionals in the area of postsecondary education. This degree is for individuals with a master’s degree who are interested in advancing their careers, preparing for a doctoral program, or enhancing their practice in the areas of higher education leadership, teaching or developmental education in two- and four-year colleges or in adult education programming in an institution and organization. Students must select one of the following concentrations: Adult and Developmental Education, Community College and University Leadership, or Teaching. The Ed.S. in Higher Education meets the prerequisite of an Ed.S. from Appalachian to enter an off-campus cohort for the doctoral program at Appalachian. The Ed.S. in Higher Education is a non-licensure program and does not lead to North Carolina teaching, administration, or supervision licensure.

General Information for All Students: A student working toward a degree and/or licensure in the Department of Leadership and Educational Studies must develop her/his Program of Study in consultation with an approved advisor. Candidacy forms must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies and Research before the student has completed 12 semester hours of course work. Degree students taking courses without being officially assigned an advisor and receiving the advisor’s approval do so at the risk of not having the courses approved as part of the degree program.

All electives must be approved by the student’s advisor in all programs. Students pursuing or holding graduate degrees in other departments, and also seeking administration and supervision licensure, must take the necessary courses and internship prescribed by the Department of Leadership and Educational Studies.

Location of Program: The Higher Education programs are offered on campus in Boone in the format described in this Bulletin. Off-campus cohorts are started periodically, and follow a part-time extended program format. For information on upcoming off-campus cohorts, please contact the Office of Distance Education: distance.appstate.edu.

Community College Teaching (Non-Licensure) Professional Education Requirements in Programs Outside of Higher Education: In addition to the Teaching concentration in Higher Education, there are other programs that focus on college teaching. Majors available to students are: English, French, Mathematics, and Spanish. For required courses in the academic field, see the appropriate section. It is highly recommended that 6-12 s.h. of graduate professional higher education (HE) courses should be chosen with the advice and approval of the graduate advisor. Refer to specific information in the major department or contact the Department of Leadership and Educational Studies.

Library Science

mls.appstate.edu

Kim Becnel, Program Director
becnelke@appstate.edu

The Master of Library Science (MLS) is nationally recognized by the American Association of School Librarians (AASL), nationally accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and approved by the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction. The program reflects Media Coordinator (School Librarian) competencies required by the state as well as Public Librarian Certification competencies of the North Carolina Public Librarian Certification Commission. Completion of the program of study entitles the graduate to apply for licensure (076 Media Coordinator) from the State of North Carolina and to apply for Public Librarian Certification from the North Carolina Public Librarian Certification Commission.

Using a combination of off-campus teaching methodologies, the Library Science program mission is to make a positive impact on K-12 students and public library patrons by providing the State of North Carolina with appropriately educated school and public librarians who take leadership roles in the state, nation, and world. High quality faculty, who create authentic learning experiences that blend theory with practice and consistently engage in relevant research, creative, and service activities, help to accomplish this mission. The Library Science program shares a commitment with the Reich College.

The Department of Leadership and Educational Studies serves the education community and the public through:

  • foundations of education courses for teacher education majors
  • research courses to help students develop skills and knowledge needed to understand the design, implementation, and evaluation of educational research
  • graduate programs in public school administration; community college and higher education administration, teaching, developmental education and adult education; library science; and educational media/instructional technology

General Information for All Students: A student working toward a degree and/or licensure in the Department of Leadership and Educational Studies must develop her/his Program of Study in consultation with an approved advisor. Degree students taking courses without being officially assigned an advisor and receiving the advisor’s approval do so at the risk of not having the courses approved as part of the degree program.

Students pursuing or holding graduate degrees in other departments, and also seeking administration and supervision licensure, must take the necessary courses and internship prescribed by the Department of Leadership and Educational Studies.

Courses in the dual degree program are offered online. The method of instruction depends on the course and instructor. Students need access to a computer with Broadband Internet access, a head set, and a microphone. Minimum requirements are Intel Dual Core or Core Duo (PC) 1.6GHz (XP) or 2.0GHz or Intel Mac 1.6GHz (OS 10.6 or Higher), minimum 2 GB memory, 4 GB preferable, and have a video graphics card that supports DirectX 9.0+ and OpenGL 1.3+. Computers less than 2 years old are generally adequate. Additional software may be required.

Educational Administration, EdS
School Administration, MSA
School Leadership Graduate Certificate

Barbara Howard, Graduate Program Director 
howardbb@appstate.edu

The Department of Leadership and Educational Studies serves the education community and the public through:

  • foundations of education courses for teacher education majors.
  • research courses to help students develop skills and knowledge needed to understand the design, implementation, and evaluation of educational research.
  • graduate programs in public school administration; community college and higher education administration, teaching,
  • developmental education and adult education; library science; and educational media/instructional technology.

The Master of School Administration degree prepares candidates for the challenges and rigor of the principalship in pk-12 schools. It will result in a North Carolina Principal’s License, which is considered an entry-level administrative license. The focus of this program is the development of the skills and knowledge required by the North Carolina Standards for School Executives, revised and adopted by the North Carolina State Board of Education in 2011.

The Educational Administration (Ed.S.) degree provides advanced graduate work in school administration at the Central Office or Superintendent’s level. This degree leads to the sixth-year administrator license. The goal of this program is to prepare candidates for higher levels of educational administrative responsibility, typically in specialized positions in central office administration such as director, Associate/Assistant Superintendent or Superintendent. The focus of this program is the development of the knowledge and skills required by the North Carolina Standards for School Superintendents, adopted by the North Carolina State Board of Education (2007). Applicants must hold a valid North Carolina Principal’s license.

General Information for All Students: A student working toward a degree and/or licensure in the Department of Leadership and Educational Studies must develop her/his Program of Study in consultation with an approved advisor. Candidacy forms must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies and Research before the student has completed 12 semester hours of course work. Degree students taking courses without being officially assigned an advisor and receiving the advisor’s approval do so at the risk of not having the courses approved as part of the degree program.

All electives must be approved by the student’s advisor in all programs. Students pursuing or holding graduate degrees in other departments, and also seeking administration and supervision licensure, must take the necessary courses and internship prescribed by the Department of Leadership and Educational Studies.

Students wishing to pursue any of the above degree programs should apply to the graduate school for admission. The Graduate School will provide the necessary information as to what is expected with the completed application. When the application is complete in all details, it will be sent to the department for action by the faculty in the program area. A number of the degree programs require a student to possess teacher licensure. Students should check for this in the specific degree program requirements.

Location of Instruction: Online

Programs

Education Specialist

Dual Degree Programs

Master of Arts

Master of Library Science

Master of School Administration

Graduate Certificate

Courses

Foundations of Education

  •  

    FDN 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    FDN 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Subject matter may vary from term to term depending on student interest and need. A student may enroll more than once in a selected topics course provided that the content does not duplicate that of the previous course. Limit of six hours credit.
  •  

    FDN 5800 - History of American Education (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A study of the historical development of education in the United States. Special emphasis is given to educational concepts and practices as they relate to political, social, and cultural development in the growth of a system of public education.
  •  

    FDN 5801 - Education of the Culturally Diverse (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A general survey of situations encountered by the teacher in a culturally diverse society. An emphasis on the development of the empathetic teacher and the creation of teacher strategies and materials.
    [Dual-listed with FDN 4800.]
  •  

    FDN 5810 - Education in Appalachian America (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    A course designed to assist the teacher of mountain children in understanding the pupil and school in the Appalachian culture. Various Appalachian cultural descriptors and their effect on schooling will be discussed with attention to the creation of teaching strategies and materials.
    [Dual-listed with FDN 4810.]
  •  

    FDN 5840 - Social and Philosophical Foundations of Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An examination of the philosophical assumptions which appear to influence education policy decisions and an examination of social forces which impact on education - particularly the process we call schooling. Inquiry into significant social and philosophical issues in education is a major component.
  •  

    FDN 5861 - History of Postsecondary Education in America (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    The study of the development of colleges and universities, community, junior, and technical colleges; and the adult and community education movements. The impact of movement in education, internationally on the development of postsecondary education in America are explored. The study of current issues and problems in postsecondary education is included.
  •  

    FDN 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. FDN 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  •  

    FDN 5999 - Thesis (3-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    For (077) Instructional Technology Specialist only. Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.
  •  

    FDN 6500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    FDN 6530-6549. - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    FDN 6600 - Historical Survey of Reading Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Provides student with breadth and depth in the evolution of the field of reading. History of the field will be studied along the following subdivisions: 1) sociology of reading, 2) physiology and psychology of reading, and 3) pedagogy of reading.

Higher Education

  •  

    H E 5050 - Designing Adult Learning Experiences Using Technology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides a guided study and practice in the integration of technology into the design of adult learning experiences. It includes the basic principles and theories of instructional design and adult learning and an overview of instructional technologies currently used to deliver, support, manage, and facilitate teaching and learning experiences. Emphasis is placed on the students’ reflective exploration, planning, and implementation of various learning technologies in authentic instructional settings.
  •  

    H E 5090 - Adult and Developmental Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course introduces students to the foundations of adult and developmental education. It provides a framework for advanced study of the field by addressing its history, development, delivery methods, and models and techniques for providing adult and developmental education.
  •  

    H E 5420 - The Community College (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An analysis of two-year colleges in the United States. Emphases include historical development, mission, student characteristics, teaching and learning, curriculum planning, governance, finance, and current trends. Attention is also given to the role of the community college in serving its community and the values that guide this endeavor.
  •  

    H E 5430 - Organization and Governance in Higher Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is a study of the concepts of organization and governance as applied to postsecondary institutions in the United States. Emphasis is placed on structure and the functions of leadership and management as well as the varied ways both public and private institutions are governed.
  •  

    H E 5440 - College and University Teaching (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is a study of instructional theory with an emphasis on the merger of theory with practice in the development of learning strategies at the university and community college levels of education. Emphasis will be given to adult learning styles, teaching styles and the process of course development.
  •  

    H E 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Subject matter may vary depending on student interest and need. A student may enroll more than once provided the content does not duplicate that of the previous course.
  •  

    H E 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    H E 5630 - The Adult Learner (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    A study of the characteristics of adults as learners. Special attention is given to review of research on adult learning and to the role of the adult educator as a facilitator in the learning process.
  •  

    H E 5635 - Adult Development and Learning Theories (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is a study of major theories of adult learning and adult development and their implications for educational practice and public policy in postsecondary education.
  •  

    H E 5640 - College Access and Student Success (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course addresses the political, social, economic, and historical context of college access and student success. It also explores ways to foster greater access and success, including policy actions, institutional conditions, and programmatic interventions.
  •  

    H E 5650 - Curriculum in Higher Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines the history, purpose, and philosophies of curriculum in universities and community colleges. There will be an analysis of selected curriculum theories and how they relate to major components of the curriculum including general education, the major, career programs, developmental education, and continuing education.
  •  

    H E 5700 - Leadership in Higher Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is a study of leadership praxis with activities designed to improve skills in planning, decision-making, organizing, communication, and evaluation in higher education.
  •  

    H E 5710 - Teaching and Learning in Adult and Developmental Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course addresses the theoretical approaches and practices employed to assist underprepared learners to succeed in postsecondary education. It describes research-based institutional characteristics and classroom strategies demonstrated to be effective in providing instruction and promoting learning for adult and developmental students.
  •  

    H E 5720 - Program Development (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines program development from a theoretical as well as a conceptual approach. It provides an overview of the major programming models and focuses on both the administrative and instructional functions related to program development.
  •  

    H E 5730 - Assessment and Evaluation (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course addresses assessment and evaluation policies and practices in U.S. higher education. It explores issues and practices in student assessment, outcomes measurement, evaluation criteria selection, course and program evaluations, and data analysis.
  •  

    H E 5740 - Learning Assistance in Higher Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides an introduction to the learning assistance movement in U.S. colleges and universities as well as in adult education. It addresses the philosophy, history, theory, delivery models, services, and practice of learning assistance.
  •  

    H E 5780 - Grantsmanship in Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A study of fiscal resources available to researchers and practitioners in professional education, involving identification of funding sources, an understanding of proposal requirements and strategies for proposal development, competence in proposal evaluation, experience in the drafting and submission of a specific proposal to an appropriate agency.
  •  

    H E 5840 - Higher Education Finance (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is a study of financial management principles relating to higher education. Consideration is given to sources of funds, budgeting, purchasing, and financial accountability in higher education.
  •  

    H E 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. HE 5989 does not count toward a degree.
  •  

    H E 5990 - Ethical and Legal Issues in Higher Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An overview of ethics and of the law as it affects the administrator and teacher in higher education. The accent is on learning about ethics and the general concepts and sources of higher education law and regulations. Additionally, each student will select an individual problem area (case) for more detailed study.
  •  

    H E 5999 - Thesis (2-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    H E 6040 - Readings in Postsecondary Education (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Emphasis is given to understanding the conceptual framework of adult education, community education, developmental education, teaching, and administration through the study of relevant literature. Each student will conduct a study of the literature in one of these areas.
  •  

    H E 6090 - Seminar in Adult and Developmental Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides opportunities for students to develop their own theoretical and philosophical frameworks for developmental education and apply these to the organization, implementation, and evaluation of developmental education and learning assistance programs.
  •  

    H E 6310 - Critical Issues in Adult and Developmental Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines social, political, ethical, and economic issues impacting adult and developmental education and helps students deepen their skills of analysis in dealing with complex problems in the field today. The course provides students with opportunities to study issues of particular interest to them at a level typically not possible in other courses.
  •  

    H E 6320 - Institutional Effectiveness (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to provide an overview of the principles of institutional effectiveness, including the processes and implications for required accreditation strategic planning, the establishment of continuing and integrated research-based planning and evaluation processes for educational programs and services that result in continuing improvement and demonstrate the effective accomplishment of mission and purpose.
  •  

    H E 6330 - Organizing for Learning and Diversity (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course explores how universities and community colleges can become learning-centered institutions in an emerging multicultural society. It pays particular attention to the shift from diversity as an isolated initiative to diversity as a catalyst for educational excellence for all students.
  •  

    H E 6340 - Policy Analysis in Higher Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to help prepare leaders in university and community college institutions to understand interest groups and respond to intended and unintended external public relations issues arising from various interest groups’ expectations and how these relations with interest groups translate into policy.
  •  

    H E 6350 - Leading Organizational Change in Higher Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course helps educators in universities and community colleges strengthen their skills in leading change at both the institutional and the departmental levels. It explores research and theory in the field, including the role of individual change to departments within the larger change process.
  •  

    H E 6360 - Organizational Analysis in Higher Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is an organizational analysis of higher education that uses various theories of systems thinking. The course explores how theory guides organizational development and behavior and informs leadership praxis in university and community college institutions. The content of the course is grounded in systems theory and thinking with a series of learning activities designed to cultivate analytical, critical, and reflective thinking regarding organizational processes.
  •  

    H E 6370 - Designing Culturally Responsive Learning Environments (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to assist educators in including adult learners’ cultural references in all aspects of learning. The course focuses on the role culture plays in how groups and individuals communicate and receive information, as well as in influencing thinking processes. It provides readings, resources, and research to prepare educators to become more culturally responsive as well as to utilize culturally responsive teaching practices.
  •  

    H E 6500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Subject matter may vary depending on student interest and need. A student may enroll more than once provided the content does not duplicate that of the previous course.
  •  

    H E 6530-6549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Topics considered may include the following: Seminar in Educational Leadership; and Seminar in College Administration, etc.
  •  

    H E 6550 - Seminar in Comparative Education (2-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A comparative study of post-compulsory institutions in other countries. Emphasis on the governance, administrative, curricular and instructional issues, concerns, and processes as they relate to the role of post-compulsory institutions. The study of an educational system is done in conjunction with seminars and visitations to educational institutions as well as travel throughout the countries under consideration, when possible.
  •  

    H E 6600 - Seminar in Legal Problems (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Current legal issues and problems related to organization and administration of public and private educational institutions.
    (Same as LSA 6600 .)
  •  

    H E 6631 - Teaching and Learning in Postsecondary Education (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An in-depth study of learning concepts with implications for instructional models. Special emphasis is given to the process of structuring learning experiences.
  •  

    H E 6650 - Seminar in Postsecondary Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    To help students integrate their personal and professional development. Particular attention is given to supporting them in developing the capacity to engage in reflective practice and to understand the connections between individual development and organizational development.
  •  

    H E 6840 - Personnel Policy and Practice in Higher Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The course’s emphasis explores a wide variety of employment issues, including the rapidly changing areas of exceptions to the employment-at-will rule, and disability discrimination in employment. Further, the course includes a very broad range of employment law topics, such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Also, a detailed study will be made of all aspects of personnel administration such as recruitment and selection, job evaluation, compensation and benefits, and discipline and discharge. Finally, selected sections of the ASU Faculty Handbook will be studied.
  •  

    H E 6861 - American Higher Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is specifically designed to give students a broad knowledge-base of the purpose, function, and governance of higher education in the United States. This course will explore the dynamics of American higher education through an examination of political movements, governmental processes, public administration, and socioeconomic and philosophical issues that impact university and community institutions.
  •  

    H E 6900 - Higher Education Internship/Field Study (2-8)


    When Offered: On Demand.
    Supervised experiences of teaching and/or administration under the direction of competent personnel, or the study of problems in postsecondary educational institutions or other appropriate agencies.
  •  

    H E 6999 - Education Specialist Thesis (2-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring

Instructional Technology/Computers

  •  

    ITC 5220 - Digital Technologies in Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Exploration of the various roles of digital technologies in instructional, service and clinical settings.
  •  

    ITC 5240 - Designing Instruction for Digital-Age Learners (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The exploration of a variety of issues related to designing authentic and engaging instruction for today’s digital learners. The coursework will focus on identifying the characteristics and dispositions of digital learners within the context of 21st century skills in order to develop effective instruction. Topics will include: examining the theoretical and pedagogical research base that informs the design of authentic learning contexts, identifying relevant instructional strategies and best practices, and utilizing the appropriate digital tools to develop innovative instructional environments.
  •  

    ITC 5260 - Promoting 21st Century Literacies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will focus on an understanding of 21st century skills and themes and it will engage students in discussions, activities, and projects related to issues of information, media, multicultural, and visual literacies. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the ethical and legal issues surrounding the access and use of information, evaluating social and cultural differences in order to collaborate effectively with others from a range of social and cultural backgrounds, examining how media can influence beliefs and behaviors, and utilizing appropriate visual media creation tools.
  •  

    ITC 5330 - Utilizing Networking and Communications Technologies for Learning (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The exploration of telecommunications and social networking in the learning environment. Includes attributes and implementation of learning activities that take advantage of telecommunications/social networking facilities and tools, types of technologies and networks available, setting up connections, and maintaining telecommunications facilities.
  •  

    ITC 5350 - Technology Policy and Law (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An exploration of existing policies and laws relating to instructional technology. Discussion of the processes involved with policy development, practice in writing, advocating for new policies, and policy changes.
  •  

    ITC 5440 - Digital Learning Environments in a Changing Society (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will focus on the issues surrounding the utilization of various technologies designed to create digital learning environments, including, but not limited to, Massive Multiplayer Online (MMO) games, Virtual Worlds and Augmented Reality. Special focus will be placed on the current technologies that are available to integrate within educational environments, methodologies for properly integrating those tools, and elements for designing or tailoring these tools for specific instructional needs.
  •  

    ITC 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Subject matter may vary depending on student interest and need. A student may enroll more than once provided the content does not duplicate that of the previous course.
  •  

    ITC 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Subject matter may vary from term to term depending on student interest and need. A student may enroll more than once in a selected topics course provided that the content does not duplicate that of the previous course. Limit of six hours credit.
  •  

    ITC 5550 - Professional Development, Innovation, and Systemic Change (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An exploration of the change process as it relates to innovations as well as the research, issues and design of professional development programs for change within professional institutions such as schools. The application of differing instructional strategies designed for innovative changes will be examined within the context of dealing with organizational barriers.
  •  

    ITC 5620 - Vision and Strategies for Integration of Digital Technologies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The study of processes that facilitate the incorporation of computer capabilities into the K-12 school curriculum, including the identification of appropriate instructional settings for computer use and the means to support teachers as they introduce the use of computers into the curriculum. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of the use of the computer as a tool that enables learning.
  •  

    ITC 5642 - Design and Development of Digital Media (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course introduces the student to a range of digital tools for the design and production of web based education and information design. Topics include web page development and design, design of digital graphics, video, visual design, animation, and issues concerning information design, service, site management and a review of current research on effective instructional design for web based learning environments.
  •  

    ITC 5720 - Planning for Instructional Technology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The development of technology plans for existing and future schools that incorporate current levels of technology and allow for the growth into new technologies. Included will be the evaluation of hardware and software and the development of networking systems.
  •  

    ITC 5730 - Advanced Web Design, Development and Systems (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course will provide students with an advanced exploration into web design, development and the systems required to deliver web-based solutions. This class will include web programming, database integration, scripting, and the selection/installation/ management of web hosting solutions. Students will research trends and issues in advanced web technologies.
    Prerequisite: ITC 5642  or permission of instructor.
  •  

    ITC 5800 - Designing 3D Immersive Environments for Instruction (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will provide the theoretical and pedagogical frameworks for the design and implementation of immersive environments for instruction. Students will explore models of and research about effective planning and building of these environments to promote meaningful interactions among participants. Students will begin to design activities and artifacts for inclusion in immersive spaces.
  •  

    ITC 5820 - Creating and Sustaining 3D Immersive Environments for Learning (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides students the opportunity to incorporate the knowledge and experiences learned to date by working individually and in teams to develop, deploy and evaluate immersive learning communities to meet the needs of educational, community or other organizations. In doing so, students will gain practical experience while taking the initiative for independent and authentic learning.
    Prerequisite: ITC 5800  or equivalent.
  •  

    ITC 5825 - Advanced Instructional Design Concepts and Applications (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course will allow learners to engage with a variety of concepts and issues related to designing effective and engaging online learning. Topics such as Universal Design for Learning, authentic assessment, scaffolding learning needs, facilitating community and presence, and evaluating effectiveness will all be explored as learners design and develop learning materials and relevant instructional modules. Emphasis will be placed on applying theories and strategies to authentic online learning settings.
    Prerequisite: C I 5921  or permission of instructor.
  •  

    ITC 5900 - Internship in Educational Computing (2-6)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Supervised experiences of leadership and management under the direction of competent personnel or study of problems in a public school, public school system, or other appropriate agency/institution.
  •  

    ITC 5910 - Applications of Digital Technologies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This capstone course provides students the opportunity to incorporate their knowledge and experiences to date by working individually and in teams to develop, deploy and evaluate applications of digital technologies in educational organizations. In doing so, students will gain practical experience while taking the initiative for independent and authentic learning.
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or program director.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    ITC 6010 - Learning, Design, and Technology (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course will address the many areas related to promoting instructional innovation and effective technology integration in schools. Areas of focus will include developing a broader understanding of the emerging literature base that informs instructional innovation and emerging contexts for learning, identifying mechanisms and strategies for professional development and systemic change, and identifying local and global communities of practice that promote effective instruction and technological integration across disciplines. Focus will be on designing programs and processes at the school level to promote effective technology integration.
  •  

    ITC 6020 - Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Utilizing Digital Technologies (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This advanced seminar in instructional technology focuses on trends and emerging technologies that are currently transforming society, and which have the potential to profoundly impact our lives in the future. Advances in robotics, artificial intelligence, genetic engineering, and data analytics have and will continue to result in innovations in healthcare, productivity, and economic advantages for some, however, it is important to examine how these emerging technologies may influence social systems in developing regions, and impact issues related to human rights and equality. This course, then, takes a critical look at the relationship between technology and society, with consideration given to globalizations’ advancement of technology, and the impact this has on issues of social justice, such as human rights, gender equality, wealth equity, and sustainable development.
  •  

    ITC 6030 - Planning for Instructional Technology Initiatives (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course includes a detailed investigation of the leadership expertise needed to develop and support a variety of instructional technology integration initiatives. Students will explore and assess the necessary infrastructure components, support models, connectivity considerations, policy development and security protections related to technology systems and device integration in educational environments. Students will develop a deep understanding of the importance of aligning organizational vision and mission goals with the planning and implementation of technology-related systems, facilities, infrastructure, policy development and security to support instructional initiatives. Students will assess, design and develop plans to implement technological initiatives into existing educational environments, new construction and renovation, and explore RFPs and other funding considerations for instructional systems and devices. Maintenance considerations,Total Cost of Ownership and Return on Investment will also be explored.
  •  

    ITC 6040 - Technology Leadership and Management for Systemic Improvement (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to help individuals provide digital age leadership and management to continuously improve organizations through the effective use of information and technology resources. Participants will explore management strategies for technology organizations, effective tools and strategies for change management, and plans for advocacy for instructional technology procedures and initiatives.
  •  

    ITC 6550 - Information Technology Systems in Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is intended to help senior level school leaders at the district level understand the functional uses of major district-level information systems technology. These information systems form a data-based foundation for many of the critical decisions that public school districts are required to make as central to district level administration. While the technological backbones of these systems are not a necessary part of the knowledge base for senior level school leaders, understanding how to query these systems, understanding the scope and limitations of these systems, and understanding how to apply information from these systems to the problems and practices of a contemporary 21st century public school district is a critical part of connecting information to systems thinking and strategic decision-making.
  •  

    ITC 6910 - Research and Applications in Instructional Technology Leadership (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This capstone course provides students the opportunity to incorporate their knowledge and experiences to date by working individually to develop, deploy and evaluate applications of digital technologies in educational organizations. Candidates will employ needs assessments, develop a research basis for the project chosen, and participate in action research and/or program evaluation to determine the success of the selected initiative. In doing so, students will gain practical experience while taking the initiative for independent and authentic learning.
    Prerequisite: Permission of advisor or instructor required.
    Graded on an S/U basis.

Leadership in School Administration

  •  

    LSA 5010 - Public School Administration (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An introductory study of basic structure, organization, and philosophical theories and administration of public schools of the U.S.
  •  

    LSA 5030 - The Principalship (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    The purpose of this course is to help students develop a conceptual framework for the leadership role and functions of the principalship. Leadership theory, principles and practice applicable to the organizational components of schools will be emphasized. Research on leadership and the processes of leading change will be analyzed.
  •  

    LSA 5400 - Developing and Managing Resources in Schools (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to prepare entry-level school leaders and executives to provide the necessary leadership in key areas of resources management, including the management of dollars (fiscal), space (building operations), people (personnel management), community resources (engagement) and time. All candidates will be expected to engage in significant electronic exploration, solving various problems in managing resources and sharing their solutions with other candidates.
  •  

    LSA 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Subject matter may vary depending on student interest and need. A student may enroll more than once provided the content does not duplicate that of the previous course.
  •  

    LSA 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Subject matter may vary from term to term depending on student interest and need. A student may enroll more than once in a selected topics course provided that the content does not duplicate that of the previous course. Limit of six hours credit.
  •  

    LSA 5585 - Teacher Leadership and School Improvement (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to help teachers develop an understanding of and skill in assuming leadership roles and responsibilities in their schools. Those aspects of school leadership seen as most appropriate and potentially beneficial for teacher involvement will be emphasized. Particular attention is paid to the relationships among teacher leadership, school improvement, and site- based accountability. Students will have the opportunity to acquire knowledge and skills and formulate their own approaches through both university-based classroom and site-based clinical activities. Activities such as participant- observations, shadow-studies classroom-action research, problem-based learning, case studies, survey research, and qualitative research studies can be included. Students will be expected to present tangible evidence that represents, authentically, their professional growth.
    (Same as C I 5585 .)
  •  

    LSA 5600 - School Law (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the fundamental principles underlying the relationship of the state to education and the laws which are applicable to practical problems of school organization and administration.
  •  

    LSA 5650 - Ethical and Humane Dimensions of Educational Leadership (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course addresses the broad range of humane and ethical issues, perspectives, and obligations (legal, moral, and aspirational) that collectively relate to individual and organizational purposes. Students will consider aims and values that should guide such things as academic mission and objectives, educational policies and practices, school culture, and human relations and supervision; all related to ethical dimensions of leadership. Students are expected to think critically about a broad and difficult range of issues and dilemmas, requiring the use and development of effective analytical skills, dialog, and processes.
  •  

    LSA 5800 - Critical Inquiry and Thought in Educational Leadership (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed as a culminating course for the Master of School Administration program. The course examines current issues and problems that impact school administration. Emphasis is focused on administrative tasks, roles, and functions of educational leaders in schools. The course includes an in-depth review of contemporary trends that change or influence educational administration and governance.
  •  

    LSA 5820 - Theory and Development in Educational Organizations (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The purpose of this course is to inform students in educational leadership of the nature of organizations and ways in which educational organizations maintain themselves. During the course, it will be emphasized that organizational theory and development are eventually about how people grow and develop relationships. The course is designed to bring educational leadership and organizational thinking into a common framework. Students will have the opportunity to examine their own assumptions about organizations, to engage in the study of organizational culture, and to study how organizations form as they do.
  •  

    LSA 5850 - Politics and Public Policy Analysis for Educational Leadership (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Designed to give students a comprehensive view of the transformation of educational problems into policy and the bureaucratic duties of public education administrators. Equip educational leaders with knowledge of policy theory, development, implementation and analysis necessary in the management of public educational institutions and agencies.
  •  

    LSA 5900 - School Administration and Supervision Internship/Practicum (3-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide students with supervised experiences of leadership and management or a supervised project-based learning experience in a school setting under the direction of competent personnel.
  •  

    LSA 5910 - Building-Level Action Research Leadership Evidences (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course requires completion of supervised site-based research projects resulting in evidences emanating from national and state executive leadership standards. Intensive research is conducted relative to building-level leadership and supporting specific topics addressing current issues of building-level leadership practice through specific experiences, readings and seminar participation.
  •  

    LSA 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  •  

    LSA 5999 - Thesis (3-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    LSA 6020 - Organization and Systems Theory for District Leaders (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course integrates research in organization and systems theory with the goal of developing an essential understanding of how and why groups organize for educational purposes. Specific traditional and cutting edge organizational theories and frameworks are explored with respect to leading change resulting in healthy, sustainable education organizations. Specific district level organizational analysis projects and case studies are fundamental aspects of the course.
  •  

    LSA 6030 - School District Leadership (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to review the major aspects of public school leadership. Candidates will be expected to review best practice as identified by literature of the discipline, while maintaining a practitioner’s perspective. Students will be expected to build upon previous coursework and experience in school administration as well as current research in acquiring an understanding of the various positions of district level leadership in our public schools.
  •  

    LSA 6080 - District Leadership: Data-Informed Strategic Planning (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides prospective school district executive high-level working knowledge of data systems-their structure, use, and analysis. The course provides content designed for district-level leaders of teams charged with developing and interpreting education data for school district executive decision-making. The course is presented in three modules: (1) Evaluating the Quality of Tests, Assessments and Other Measurement Data, (2) Databases and Data Warehousing (How to build a database or data warehouse and how to use it), and (3) A Look to the Future: Learning Analytics (How to make sense out of large sets of data).
  •  

    LSA 6180 - School Finance (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the principles which contribute to an understanding of public school finance. Emphasis is placed on budget making, fiscal management, and business operations.
  •  

    LSA 6190 - Developing and Managing District Resources (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides an opportunity for students to reflect critically on resource development and management. Emphasis is given to problems of practice, while considering the roles school personnel play within the operation of a school district. Students will learn about the human and managerial complexities related to the development and management of resources necessary for promoting effective educational organizations. The course will develop district office administrators, who are able to acquire the knowledge and develop the capacity to create high performing human relations (HR) teams, as well as to understand the HR function and its roles in organizational and individual development. Candidates will learn to apply theory to authentic problems and practices in school districts through research–‐based solutions. The course will employ a variety of pedagogical strategies including lectures, guest lectures from practicing administrators, individual and group assignments, various forms of Educational technology, case studies, simulations, authentic assessment, and class discussions.
  •  

    LSA 6250 - School District Organizational Communications (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course explores the topic of organizational communications by examining the different models and metaphors through which scholars and practitioners have attempted to understand organizations, from the mechanistic perspective of “scientific management” to the organizational view of systems theory. This course explores the implications of these models in terms of what they imply about the nature of human behavior and motivation, the role or function of organizations within society, and the role of communication within organizations.
  •  

    LSA 6300 - Human Resources Organization and Development (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to help senior level school leaders and administrators at the district office level develop knowledge and capacity to create high performing Human Relations (HR) teams. The focus of the course is on the HR function and its roles in organizational and individual development. Particular emphasis is given to the theory and application of knowledge to authentic problems and practices in school districts through research-based solutions to organizational and individual development issues.
  •  

    LSA 6400 - Leading Change in Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is designed to assist school leaders in the process of leading and managing change in educational organizations. The content is appropriate for any practicing or aspiring educational leader who faces the dynamics of changing educational settings. The course provides both conceptual and practical models for managing the change process. A primary focus is placed on educational and instructional leadership.
  •  

    LSA 6491 - Educational Facilities (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Planning the modern school plant, design and nature of functional educational facilities, personnel involvement, maintenance, determining the needs of the community, factors in the selection of sites, architectural and contractual services.
Page: 1 | 2

Department of Reading Education and Special Education

rese.appstate.edu

Woodrow Trathen, Chair
trathenwr@appstate.edu

Reading Education

Woodrow Trathen, Graduate Certificate Program Director
trathenwr@appstate.edu

Beth Frye, Graduate Degree Program Director
fryeem@appstate.edu

The Master of Arts degree in Reading Education, General has two concentrations: Adult Literacy and Classroom/Clinical. Each concentration provides a well-balanced program of academic and practicum experiences designed to produce graduates capable of providing quality services to the region, state, and nation. The Adult Literacy concentration prepares instructors and administrators to deliver and coordinate literacy services for adults seeking to improve their reading and writing skills. The Classroom/Clinical concentration is intended for classroom teachers and reading specialists. Students with this concentration are prepared to teach all aspects of reading and language arts to K-12 students. Upon completion, graduates are eligible for Master (M) level teaching licensure.

Location of Program: The MA and certificate programs are offered on campus in Boone in the format described in this Bulletin. The programs are also offered off campus in a part-time format, and applications are accepted on a rolling basis. For information on upcoming off-campus locations, please contact the Office of Distance Education: distance.appstate.edu.

Special Education, MA and Autism Spectrum Disorders Graduate Certificate

Woodrow Trathen, Graduate Certificate Program Director
trathenwr@appstate.edu

Rebecca Shankland, Graduate Degree Program Director
shanklandrk@appstate.edu

The Master of Arts degree in Special Education prepares teachers and others to work with students with Intellectual Disabilities (Mental Retardation), Learning Disabilities, Emotional/Behavioral Disorders, and Autism Spectrum Disorders. Persons graduating from the program will have fulfilled the competencies required for the advanced competencies licensure from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (as long as the hold an A-level license that the M-level license can be added onto) and be eligible for employment in a variety of special education settings to include public and private schools with the necessary license as well as community settings. Students will be expected to complete products of learning to demonstrate skills of a master teacher. Students complete a portfolio and action research project for the degree.

The Graduate Certificate in Autism Spectrum Disorders is an interdisciplinary certificate program designed for professionals working in the field of autism spectrum disorders including teachers, related service providers, human service agency personnel, families, and community supports. Students currently enrolled in graduate degree programs may elect to complete the graduate minor in Austism Spectrum Disorders.

Location of Instruction: The Special Education and Autism Spectrum Disorders programs are offered on campus in Boone in the format described in this Bulletin. Off-campus cohorts are started periodically, and follow a part-time extended program format. For information on upcoming off-campus cohorts, please contact the Office of Distance Education: distance.appstate.edu.

Programs

Master of Arts

Graduate Certificate

Graduate Minor

Courses

Reading

  •  

    R E 5010 - Literacy Instruction and Assessment for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course will address issues, strategies, technologies, materials and methods of successful literacy instruction and assessment of students with autism spectrum disorders. Inclusive and self-contained settings will be addressed through examples and experiences with students on the autism spectrum.
  •  

    R E 5040 - Teacher as Researcher (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course provides an opportunity for practitioners to explore, using systematic observations and reflection, an area of interest in their professional practice. Teachers will research and solve specific problems in educational settings. The ultimate goal is that the inquiry conducted by the student should lead to an improvement in practice and to an increased understanding of the issues, both theoretical and practical, that arise in the course of conducting research.
    (Same as C I 5040 /RES 5040 /SPE 5040 .)
  •  

    R E 5100 - Teaching Beginning Readers and Writers (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    Various approaches to teaching beginning readers and writers are introduced (K-3). There is an emphasis on teaching methods that capitalize on the language competence students bring with them to school. Word recognition, comprehension, and writing instruction are considered within the framework of a meaningful, integrated reading/language arts program.
  •  

    R E 5111 - Issues, Trends, and Practices in Reading (2-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Provides students with an in-depth study of significant issues, trends, and practices in reading at all educational levels. The course is designed to deal with questions and problems of the type facing key teachers, supervisors, and administrators. Because the course is concerned with current trends and issues, it is assumed that the course will undergo periodic changes in terms of what is current.
  •  

    R E 5120 - Psychological Bases of Reading (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The thrust of this course is toward providing advanced reading majors with a comprehensive over-view of contemporary theories of psychology and instruction as they can be applied to explicating the complex processes underlying reading behavior. Basically, the course deals with the following areas: (1) definitions of reading; (2) reading as verbal behavior; (3) perception and sensation in reading; (4) reading and cognition; (5) learning and reading; (6) growth and development and reading; (7) attention, motivation, and reading; (8) personality and reading; (9) learning from written materials; and, (10) individual differences and reading.
  •  

    R E 5130 - Teaching the Language Arts (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A study of the latest research, practices, interpretation, methods, materials and strategies in teaching the language arts.
  •  

    R E 5140 - Advanced Study of Children’s Literature (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Provides an opportunity for students to extend their knowledge of children’s books. Emphasis will be placed on an examination of the history of major publishers of children’s literature, multicultural perspectives in reading and writing, and the theories of response to literature. Consideration will be given to how literature contributes to learning and language development.
  •  

    R E 5200 - The Politics of Literacy (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines literacy from political, historical and theoretical perspectives. The role of special interest groups and federal and state agencies on literacy instruction will be examined. A strong emphasis throughout the course will be on the development of students as thinkers, researchers, writers, and advocates for effective literacy policy.
  •  

    R E 5210 - Educating Students with Reading Disabilities (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines the federal policy and school-level practices that affect the education of students with reading disabilities. Changes in federal policy will be examined across a historical context. Students will be challenged to think critically about these changes and evaluate the degree to which federal policy facilitates the education of students with reading disabilities.
  •  

    R E 5220 - Teaching Intermediate Struggling Readers (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course acquaints teachers with issues involved in providing effective reading instruction to struggling readers in grades fourth through eighth. Among these issues are assessment, materials selection, grouping and management concerns, and instruction (including comprehension, word recognition, fluency, and vocabulary). Participating teachers should leave the course with a better conceptual understanding of the specific challenges they face and strategies and tools for meeting these challenges.
  •  

    R E 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    R E 5510 - Field Experience in Teaching Reading (1-6)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Students register only by permission of the advisor.
  •  

    R E 5525 - Product of Learning (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Cross-listed: SPE 5525  
  •  

    R E 5530-5549 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    R E 5570 - Reading Curriculum: Organization, Supervision and Assessment (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Studies are made of reading curriculum designs, and the implementation, supervision and evaluation of reading programs.
    Prerequisite: 18 hours in reading or permission of the advisor.
  •  

    R E 5671 - Research in Current Literature in Reading (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Research and critical analyses are made in current periodicals, journals, and recent books on critical areas of reading.
    Prerequisite: 18 hours in reading or permission of the advisor.
  •  

    R E 5710 - Seminar in Reading and Language Arts Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Current theory and research in reading and the language arts are examined. Students select a topic in which to pursue in-depth study and then their newly-acquired knowledge is applied to classroom teaching. Emphasis is placed on assisting teachers to be leaders in school settings. This course should be taken at the end of the Master of Arts program.
  •  

    R E 5715 - Reading Assessment and Correction (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An in-depth examination of informal reading assessment practices and remedial teaching techniques. This course includes practicum experiences in administering and interpreting informal word recognition, contextual reading, and spelling instruments.
  •  

    R E 5725 - Practicum in the Clinical Teaching of Reading (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Provides students with a closely supervised practicum experience in which they assess and teach children/adults who are experiencing reading difficulties.
    Prerequisite: R E 5715 
    Corequisite: R E 5740 .
  •  

    R E 5730 - Reading and Writing Instruction for Intermediate and Advanced Learners (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    Strategies for helping students use reading and writing as tools for comprehension of texts and for learning in content-area disciplines are explored. A broad cultural view of literacy forms the context for reviewing the research on strategic teaching and learning. The general focus is on third-grade through adult learners.
  •  

    R E 5735 - Practicum in Teaching Severely Disabled Readers (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides a supervised clinical teaching experience with severely disabled readers. Students are guided in the use of systematic multisensory reading instruction. The topic of reading disability will be investigated throughout the semester.
  •  

    R E 5740 - Seminar in the Clinical Teaching of Reading (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Provides students with experiences designed to enable application to general education settings of insights gained through assessing and teaching children/adults who are experiencing reading difficulties.
    Prerequisite: R E 5715 .
    Corequistie: R E 5725 .
  •  

    R E 5760 - Adult Literacy Instruction (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An in-depth review of assessing and teaching literacy skills in Adult Basic Education programs.
  •  

    R E 5900 - Internship (3-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    An internship in the area of reading education.
    Prerequisite: permission of the advisor.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    R E 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels. RE 5989 does not count toward a degree.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    R E 5999 - Thesis (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.
  •  

    R E 6120 - Psychological Processes in Reading (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines current theories of reading processes, supporting research, and implications for teaching reading. The course is approached from a cognitive psychological perspective, where the nature of mature reading is considered first, followed by consideration of developmental issues in reading. Course topics will include research on eye movements, comprehension, phonemic awareness and decoding, beginning reading, and fluency, as well as other current theoretical issues.
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    R E 6568 - Language and Linguistics in Reading (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines language acquisition and language structure from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Students will have the opportunity to learn about cognitive, social, and cultural aspects of language. Emphasis will be placed on understanding psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic perspectives; language acquisition; and components of language, including pragmatics, semantics, syntax, morphology, and phonology. Concepts of oral and written language will be explored within the context of community and classroom discourse and literacy practice.
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    R E 6575 - Technology and Literacy (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides students an opportunity to critically examine the central issues and theoretical perspectives in research on technology and literacy, with an emphasis on critically examining the educational function of communication technology, assisted technology, digital and multimedia text, and educational software. Students will study the nature of technology and literacy, related classroom implementation issues, and specialized use of technology for students with disabilities.
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    R E 6700 - Historical Trends in Reading Theory and Research (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course examines significant trends and developments in reading theory and research from the early 1900s up to the present. Emphasis will be placed on three time periods: 1910-1930 which featured behavioral psychology, the development of basal readers and the first university-based reading clinics; 1955-1965 which featured the “Great Debate” between advocates of phonics and whole-word reading methodologies; and 1975-1995 which ushered in cognitive theories of reading and two competing psycholinguistic explanations of the reading process. Throughout the course, connections will be drawn between predominant reading theories and their effects on classroom reading materials and instructional methods.
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    R E 6731 - Advanced Issues in Literacy and Learning (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course provides opportunities for students to investigate current theory and research related to specific literacy topics. The course also engages students in analyzing current literacy programs and practices to identify the theoretical orientation, research base, historical context, and political agendas that inform them. Representative topics include: comprehension, composition, classroom discourse, vocabulary, English language learners, and evolving representations of literacy and text.
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    R E 6735 - Severe Reading Disability (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course takes an in-depth look at the topic of severe reading disability as it is currently understood. To this end, relevant research, discussion, and practices are surveyed and studied.
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    R E 7570 - Administering Reading/Language Arts Programs: The Research Base (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Provides the theoretical framework administrators need to supervise comprehensive classroom reading and language arts programs. The current research literature will be examined across several areas, including: psychological models of the reading process, reading/writing relationships, academic work, teacher effectiveness, and observation of instruction. This literature will form the basis for examining existing program approaches to teaching reading and language arts in the elementary school and for content area programs in middle and secondary schools. Next, “ideal” program models will be developed, and, finally, methods for implementing, supervising and evaluating programs will be analyzed.
  •  

    R E 7710 - Improving Reading/Language Arts Instruction in the Schools: Problem-Solving Seminar for Administrators (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This seminar will focus on real world problems that administrators face in planning, implementing, and evaluating reading/language arts programs in public school settings. Discussion of pre-selected problems (with corresponding reading lists) will form the core of the course. Students will be encouraged to focus on specific reading and writing issues and problems in their own school districts.
    Prerequisite: R E 7570 .
  •  

    R E 7989 - Doctoral Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing doctoral research.

Special Education

  •  

    SPE 5010 - Evidence-Based Practice in Early Childhood Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall.Odd-numbered years
    This course will examine the meaning of evidence-based practice as it applies in early childhood education and intervention, with the goal of preparing students to become critical consumers of research. Students will review current literature concerning evidence-based practices for early childhood settings and explore ways to apply research findings in their professional practice across a variety of settings (e.g., school, home, intervention agency).
    (Same as C I 5010 /FCS 5010 .)
  •  

    SPE 5020 - Early Intervention (3)


    When Offered: Spring. Odd-numbered years
    This course will acquaint students with federal legislation pertaining to early intervention (EI) and examine multiple ways that early intervention (EI) professionals provide services in a variety of settings (e.g., home, child care facilities, schools, agencies, and community settings such as parks and grocery stores). Characteristics and needs associated with specific disabilities will be addressed as well as strategies to individualize services for children and their families.
    (Same as C I 5020 /FCS 5020 .)
  •  

    SPE 5030 - Research Informing Practice in Special Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course introduces educational research including qualitative and quantitative research methods. Students will read and analyze relevant research on individuals with disabilities, and students will engage in the research process by collecting data, interpreting data, and considering educational implications. Through these experiences, students will develop an understanding of evidence-based interventions in their classrooms.
  •  

    SPE 5040 - Teacher as Researcher (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course provides an opportunity for practitioners to explore, using systematic observations and reflection, an area of interest in their professional practice. Teachers will research and solve specific problems in educational settings. The ultimate goal is that the inquiry conducted by the student should lead to an improvement in practice and to an increased understanding of the issues, both theoretical and practical, that arise in the course of conducting research.
    (Same as C I 5040 /RES 5040 /R E 5040 .)
  •  

    SPE 5045 - Advanced Topics in Diversity (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    A framework of theories on diversity and multicultural issues is constructed in this course. From these theories, practical applications will be derived. Research focusing on creating productive and equitable learning environments, on best practices collaboration, and on instructional accommodations and modifications will be examined.
    (Same as C I 5045 .)
  •  

    SPE 5100 - Field Training in the Teaching-Family Model (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    A field oriented course involving supervised implementation of the Teaching-Family Model treatment approach. Evaluations by both consumers and professionals in the field will be utilized as part of the training sequence.
  •  

    SPE 5101 - Advanced Field Training in the Teaching-Family Model (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This field oriented course is offered for those successfully completing the prerequisite field training course. The course is aimed at helping the student refine and modify her/his use of the Teaching-Family Model Treatment program.
    Prerequisite: SPE 5100 .
  •  

    SPE 5111 - Advanced Developmental Assessment and Program Evaluation for Children (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to provide students with skills and knowledge in assessing the development of children, and the interests, concerns, and priorities of families. Students will collect data for the purpose of monitoring children’s progress, family outcomes, and program effectiveness.
    (Same as C I 5111 /FCS 5111 .)
  •  

    SPE 5112 - Advanced Developmental Curriculum and Instruction for Young Children (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to provide students with advanced skills and knowledge in application of a research base to design, adapt and evaluate curriculum and environments suitable for the integration of infants, toddlers, preschool and kindergarten children of various developmental levels and abilities in inclusive settings.
    (Same as C I 5112 /FCS 5112 .)
  •  

    SPE 5113 - Seminar: Issues in Birth through Kindergarten Education (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This seminar is designed to build leadership skills to enable the student to consult and collaborate with other professionals. It will permit the development of depth and breadth in professional growth as well, and provide the foundation for life-long learning for the advancement of knowledge in the field of early childhood education and early intervention.
    (Same as C I 5113 /FCS 5113 .)
  •  

    SPE 5120 - Effective Educational Practices for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    In this course, current research and literature related to autism spectrum disorders and research based practices in classrooms, homes, community settings are identified, reviewed and analyzed. Other topics include use of technology and current recommended instructional practices.
  •  

    SPE 5130 - Autism Spectrum Disorders: Contemporary Issues (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    Issues concerning the prevalence, assessment, and identification of students with ASD are identified, reviewed and analyzed. Litigation and laws related to educational issues are explored.
  •  

    SPE 5140 - Social Communication in Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The purpose of this course is to develop familiarity with a variety of topics related to Autism Spectrum Disorders, including issues related to diagnosis, etiologies, intervention, theories, and characteristics of Autism across the lifespan. This course has been designed to ensure that students demonstrate required knowledge and skills acquisitions necessary to deliver effective instruction for students with ASD.
  •  

    SPE 5200 - Teaching Communication and Problem Solving Strategies Within the Teaching-Family Model (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Basic counseling strategies and problem-solving skills especially related to the Teaching-Family Model will be offered. Emphasis will be placed on working with emotionally disturbed and delinquent youths and their families in the context of residential treatment.
  •  

    SPE 5205 - Inclusion (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course examines inclusion as it relates to students with disabilities and how to integrate them into general education classrooms and K-12 schools. Current issues, collaborative relationships, and effective teaching and modification approaches for all students will be discussed.
    [Dual-listed with SPE 4205.]
  •  

    SPE 5210 - Psychoeducational Approaches to Emotional/Behavioral Disorders (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course covers theories of working with children and youth with behavioral disorders. Psychodynamic, humanistic, and behavioral strategies are examined and applied through readings, small and large group discussions, and analysis of articles and media. A theoretical foundation is built through a review of contrasting perspectives.
  •  

    SPE 5220 - Characteristics, Assessment, and Identification of Individuals with Specific Learning Disabilities (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course provides advanced knowledge about the causes, definitions and identification of students with learning disabilities. Students receive in-depth instruction in the administration of both standardized and informal assessments and their modifications.
  •  

    SPE 5230 - Assessment and Instruction of Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course identifies, reviews, and analyzes current research and literature related to the study of intellectual disabilities. The course also provides in-depth study inecological assessment and individualized curriculum development for individuals with intellectual disabilities, and it also provides indepth study and examination of the social construction of intellectual disabilities in society.
  •  

    SPE 5400 - Advanced Readings in Organization and Administration of Community-Based Treatment Programs (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    To expand the student’s knowledge of the organization and administration of community based programs. Emphasis will be placed on the process of organizing, administering, and implementing treatment programs for troubled youths.
  •  

    SPE 5500 - Independent Study (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    SPE 5525 - Product of Learning (1-3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Cross-listed: R E 5525  
  •  

    SPE 5530-5539 - Selected Topics (1-4)


    When Offered: On Demand
  •  

    SPE 5562 - Methods for Educating the Severely Handicapped (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    Principles and procedures used to program instruction for the severely handicapped are presented and evaluated as to their effectiveness. Students are required to design and implement an instructional program with a severely handicapped person.
    Corequisite: SPE 5564 .
  •  

    SPE 5564 - Curriculum for the Severely Handicapped (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The selection of instructional programs appropriate for use with the severely handicapped is emphasized. The student identifies strengths and weaknesses of educational programs and makes recommendations for their use with severely handicapped persons.
    Corequisite: SPE 5562 .
  •  

    SPE 5584 - Special Education Law and Leadership (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course introduces the student to educational leadership and examines various leadership and organizational styles. Students will articulate their personal leadership philosophy and vision. The course also examines current research and literature on leadership in schools, educational reform initiatives, and legal issues. The process of IEP writing from both a legal and leadership perspective will be included.
  •  

    SPE 5592 - Advanced Medical Aspects of Disability (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    What constitutes severe disability, its effect on the individual and multidisciplinary approaches to amelioration. Disabilities will include epilepsy, spinal cord and brain injuries, degenerative diseases, and their sequelae.
  •  

    SPE 5595 - Individual Differences (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course will provide an overview of the field of special education with emphasis on mental retardation, learning disabilities, and emotional disabilities.
  •  

    SPE 5600 - Seminar in Special Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course explores the current research in issues and controversies in the field of special education.
  •  

    SPE 5610 - Classroom Management for Effective Instruction (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course is an exploration of the literature and practices that are concerned with managing a classroom so that effective teaching can occur. This course discusses the theories developed for classroom control, then translates these theories into practical intervention techniques, both for individual students and classroom groups.
  •  

    SPE 5620 - Managing Curriculum for Mentally Retarded Students in Special and Regular Settings (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The in-depth study of curriculum design and management for mildly and moderately mentally retarded students in special and regular classroom settings, from preschool through secondary levels.
  •  

    SPE 5626 - Advanced Studies in Intellectual Disabilities (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to identify, review and analyze current research and literature related to the study of intellectual disabilities. The course also provides in-depth study in assessment, curriculum, and the planning, implementation, and evaluation of instruction for students with intellectual disabilities.
  •  

    SPE 5630 - Collaboration and Advocacy (3)


    When Offered: Fall
    This course is designed to examine issues and effective practices of collaboration, consultation, and advocacy among families, community service representatives, and professionals.
  •  

    SPE 5636 - Advanced Studies in Specific Learning Disabilities (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    This course is designed to identify, review and analyze current research and literature related to the study of learning disabilities. This course provides indepth study in assessment, curriculum, and the planning, implementation, and evaluation of instruction for students with learning disabilities.
  •  

    SPE 5640 - Educational and Career Planning (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    In this course, current research and literature related to secondary special education and transition issues are identified, reviewed and analyzed. Longitudinal planning is explored through topics including drop-out prevention, career development theory, person-centered transition planning, assessment, and best practices.
  •  

    SPE 5646 - Advanced Studies in Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (3)


    When Offered: Spring
    An advanced course designed to examine critically educational literature concerning teaching students with emotional and behavioral disorders. Relationships between theory, philosophy, research findings, and current practice are analyzed.
  •  

    SPE 5648 - Psychoeducational Approaches in the Study of Emotional Disturbance (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An investigation of psychoeducational explanations of behavior and the ways these explanations find expression in interventions with children. Emphasis placed on operational models and techniques to be utilized in a variety of settings with emotionally disturbed children.
  •  

    SPE 5700 - Introduction to the Teaching-Family Model (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    An introduction to the philosophy and implementation of the Teaching-Family Model treatment approach. Emphasis will be placed on meeting the needs and remediating problems of emotionally disturbed and delinquent youth.
    [Dual-listed with SPE 4700.]
  •  

    SPE 5901 - Internship (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    This course offers graduate students the opportunity to design, implement, and evaluate a research project with individuals with special needs.
    Prerequisite: application and permission of the advisor.
    Graded on an S/U basis.
  •  

    SPE 5989 - Graduate Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master’s and specialist’s levels.
  •  

    SPE 5999 - Thesis (1-4)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  •  

    SPE 6110 - Literacy Instruction for Students with Challenging Behaviors (3)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to help students learn and think about effective methods of meeting the literacy (reading and writing) needs of students with challenging behaviors, a population with low academic achievement. The focus will be on tier-2 (small group) and tier-3 (one-on-one) literacy instruction and strategy instruction for students in grades K-8. Critical analysis of select methods and strategies as evidence-based practices for specific student populations will also be undertaken.
  •  

    SPE 7120 - Issues and Trends in Special Education (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The examination of issues and trends in special education, with emphasis on categories and classifications; medical, psychological, technological, and socio-cultural factors; and, promising research and practices.
  •  

    SPE 7121 - Organizational Design and Implementation of Special Education Programs (3)


    When Offered: On Demand
    The critical study of the design and implementation of public school special education programs, with emphasis on present and emerging program models, instructional leadership, legislation, and professionalism.
  •  

    SPE 7989 - Doctoral Research (1-9)


    When Offered: Fall, Spring
    This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing doctoral research.


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